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Old Jul 15, 2004, 1:21 AM   #11
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http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/ni...w/DSCN0064.MOV
That's a video taken from the 3700. It looks like pretty good quality to me.

The reason why I want a high fps is because I want to take videos of myself doing my hobby (Which would require high fps because theres a lot of movement), and I would also like to take some pictures of myself doing the hobby.

I know this is going to sound dumb, but, I don't want to test drive the cameras in person because I feel it'll ruin the surprise when I actually get the camera and see it and feel it in person.
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Old Jul 15, 2004, 1:39 AM   #12
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Azure wrote:
Quote:
http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/ni...w/DSCN0064.MOV
That's a video taken from the 3700. It looks like pretty good quality to me.
Quote:
[snip]
I know this is going to sound dumb, but, I don't want to test drive the cameras in person because I feel it'll ruin the surprise when I actually get the camera and see it and feel it in person.
If you like it, great.. That's what's important.

As far as being surprised... that's up to you, too. If I might offer a suggestion: buy any camera you choose from a vendor with a no restocking fee policy. So, if you decide you don't like it (for whatever reason), you can return it for a refund.


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Old Jul 15, 2004, 4:48 AM   #13
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....know this is going to sound dumb, but, I don't want to test drive the cameras in person because I feel it'll ruin the surprise when I actually get the camera and see it and feel it in person.

Azure,

Not dumb but a strange and likely very unwise idea. The fact you've asked here about various cameras means you have an interest in the quality, features and ability. If that is so thenhaving something arrive that may be missing one of the vital ingredients could be a real downer.

I tested four cameras on 1-3 day home trial recently before I found the one I wanted. In that testing periodsome of the pre-concieved ideas I had about what I needed evolved so the camera I ended up with is one I wouldn't have chosen at the outset.

Do bear in mind there are possibly about 30 cameras in any one price bracket, and half of them will be really good, only a bias towards different abilities makes them most suited to one person or another.

Jim C was a great to me help in forum discussions when I was looking (he'd already bought his). We both had many requirements in common and an interest in getting thebest camera for our needs.

But here's the problem (in regard to you not testing yourself)...

The 4th camera I tried and found the best for me was the very one that Jim tested and returned, he just couldn't get on with it. And when, in the middle of my search, Jim linked to info on the camera he'd bought I found it was missing features that were essential to me.

I think there are two elements to this. We all can have quite different actual requirements, and we can all like/dislike a particular make or camera for personal reasons that have no logic.

Examples of this are....

Some folks find the greens to be a bit prominent on Sony cameras, I accept this and do not see it as an issue now. Most folks agree the Kodak range produce very bright colours, these are too rich for me. Fuji have nice clear images but some folks see an overall green/yellow tint in the images.

Kodak cameras, and the Fuji range with the 6MP specthat really are 3MP, often show faults due to image compression if you want to crop on the PC or view full size, but you would never see this with modest sized prints.

Personally I would never buy a camera without a powerful focus assist lamp that allows images to be taken in the dark. The Sony range has possibly the best assist lamps and after these many other makes seem very poor in low light, hunting for focus and oftenfailing.

Another absoluteessential for me is AV-out for showing images onthe TV. Many cameras have it but the odd one that otherwise seems ideal then might turn out not to have this. Want to know why this is so important to me? Take our holidays....perhaps aim to come back with 200 really nice images after a week away. What we do is shoot pretty freely, deleting any obvious mistakes in-camera while we're out. Some days we might get back to the hotel/holiday cottage with 75 images, twice as many as we really need. Well we plug the camera into the TV and look through them at a size that enables us to edit/delete as required..this is far better than doing it on an LCD. Also when we go to see elderly relatives without a PC it is great to show them a slide-show on their TV rather than printing out perhaps 200 images. Saves time and cost plus those with poor eyesight can often see the TV better than 6x4 prints.

For me movie mode "with sound" is essential also. The kids have a huge amount of fun with this. We rarely keep the movies longand of course they are nothing to rival camcorder footage. The sound quality of most Sonys is very good. If you get a Sony with a mic on the front the digital sound is striking. Just as a comparisonI found the sound on the Canon A75 terrible, indistinct and picked up more of the camera users handling noise than the actualsubject.

Speed of operation is important to me. Mine is still good by today's standards but some of the newer Sony models like the P73 are staggering, virtually instant response. If you use a P73 and then pick up a a camera with less ability in this area they feel dreadfully sluggish.

Theslight negativesI'vetraded for the excellent benefits of my camera are.....

It is a little smaller than I wanted, there is no doubt something like the A75 feels chunky andperfect to hold....but now I would struggle to use such a large(!) camera as the A75 on a daily basis. My camera is of that rectangular shape mentioned above. Now I really like this because it is the best one for slipping into pockets but I would prefer not to have the far left lens position like mine (and the Nikon 3700). I'm completely used to it but would prefer a central lens if all other things were equal. My LCD is 1.5" like the P73, smaller than I would wish but OK on a mostly auto camera. Problems do come with the more complex cameras with small LCDs where you need to see tham easily to sleect this or that setting.

You see what I'm trying to say, even after "us" telling you what's best, and you reading the reviews, there is still a long way to go in finding the actual best one for your needs. You just have to try them!

Good luck,

David

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Old Jul 17, 2004, 6:00 PM   #14
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Well, the thing is, this is just going to be a mostly general family digital camera. So, I don't think I would notice problems with the color output in picturess because this isn't going to be a serious digital camera, just a casual one.
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Old Jul 17, 2004, 6:34 PM   #15
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Azure wrote:
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Well, the thing is, this is just going to be a mostly general family digital camera. So, I don't think I would notice problems with the color output in picturess because this isn't going to be a serious digital camera, just a casual one.
Well, one way to look at it, is that your still photos were so BAD, from your video camera (because I guess they are really only frame captures), that the photos from almostany decent digital camera from a major manufacturer will be a HUGE improvement). :-)
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Old Jul 17, 2004, 6:56 PM   #16
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Yeah, so I wouldn't notice anything wrong with the picture quality from the A75, right? Since I'm only used to these pictures taken from my camcorder. So, everything will be an improvement?
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Old Jul 17, 2004, 7:27 PM   #17
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Azure wrote:
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Yeah, so I wouldn't notice anything wrong with the picture quality from the A75, right? Since I'm only used to these pictures taken from my camcorder. So, everything will be an improvement?
The A75 is a very popular camera. If you look hard enough, you can find fault in any camera's photos. However, I believe that the majority of consumers think that their digital cameras are great.

Any camera will havestrengths and limitations. Once you begin taking a lot of photos, you learn your camera's behavior, taking advantage of it's strengths and working around it's limitations.

One of the nice things about digital, is that you can take LOTS of photos (without developing and printing costs). So, if you work at it a little, you'll learn how to get the best from your camera in a short period of time.

As David (Cybershot455) pointed out, sometimes you just have to try 'em to see what fits you the best.

Because I've owned multiple digicams, I probably have a better understanding of what I really need for the types of photos I take.

However, because you have not owned one, sometimes the feature lists, etc., can be confusing. What looks like a great feature "on paper" may be something that you never use.

Photographers have been taking fantastic photos for many years -- often starting out with cameras with manual exposure only, and a fixed focal length (i.e., 50mm) lens -- using their "feet" for zoom. :-)

So, in many ways, we're just plain "spoiled".

It can be easy to get stuck in "paralysis analysis" mode, too. Sometimes it's easier to just "jump in", and starting enjoying a camera -- almost any camera.

I think the A75 would probably make a good choice for someone just getting into photography. It is a full featured model, that lets you use it in full auto mode, then using the other modes (manual exposure, aperture priority, etc.), as your skill level increases. Of course, some users never care about using other modes.

The is no one "perfect choice". Do the best you can at determining what will "do the job", in the condtions you'll use it in. Then, have fun.

An "oldie but goodie":

Writer to Photographer: Your photos are great. You must use a very nice camera!

Photographter to Writer: Your novels are great, too. You must use a very nice typewriter!

So, keep things in perspective. After all, the camera is only a tool.


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Old Jul 17, 2004, 11:53 PM   #18
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What do you think are the chances for a price drop in the A75 by Christmas?
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Old Jul 20, 2004, 8:07 PM   #19
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I might end up buying this camera a little later than I expected (Like 5-8 months from now), so, when that time comes, should I ask this question again because of all the new cameras that would come out?
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Old Jul 20, 2004, 8:33 PM   #20
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Yes. Buying a digital camera is like buying a computer. There are always new models with more features coming out, with more competitive pricing.

Of course, by waiting, you won't have a camera to enjoy in the interim.


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