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Old Jul 16, 2004, 12:08 AM   #1
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Hey pals!

I´m are a little confused with camera models.

I wanted to boy a Nikon D70 camera but is too much $$$ for me. So I was looking for a used 35mm camera.

I went to an used camera shop (good place, with warranty) and they showed me a Canon A2e with a 35-135 lens.

I need the camera because at august 8 I´ll finoish my advertising photografer course, and I need something better than a HP c912 camera (my actual digicam).

They ask 500 us$ for the body and 300 us$ for the lens. (used body and used lens). At other place i saw same camera with vertical grip for 540 us$. (and itlooks in better conditions)

Then the confussion started... The EOS elan 7 KIT or EOS30 (690us$ New with 28-90 lens) , EOS 3, EOS A2, EOS A2e, EOS1n (675us$ for the body), EOS 100 (110us$ for the body), EOS 620 (480us$ for the body)

What are the diferences...???

I need a camero for model and product shoots. Need a lens with some nice Macro (for product) and good for Portraits.

Some have some help to me?

Remember prices are not in US, prices are in ARGENTINA.

Thanks!

Leo
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Old Jul 18, 2004, 11:56 PM   #2
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please!!! help me woth these diferences to know the best choise to my needs.

I really dont want to spendmoney in features that i will not use.
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Old Jul 19, 2004, 7:04 AM   #3
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Hmmm....

If I were in your shoes, I would hit goggle very hard. Type in each of those camera names with the word "review" behind it and read up on each. Only in this way, will you be able to make an informed decision.

The more expensive cameras you listed are professional cameras with probably better weatherproofing, faster servo shots, and more bells and whistles.

The kit lens with the Elan 7 is the basic junk kit lens that is made more for cheapness then quality.

The first lens you talked about for $300 used, probably has IS, which is image stabilization. This is a fairly good quality lens that contains some internal gyros that will help you to hand hold your camera without the shakes for about 2 F stops lower then you could without it.

Here is another point to consider. Since you were looking for the Nikon D70 originally, did they show you any used Nikon cameras? The reason is this, maybe later, you want to get a Nikon DSLR, then you will be able to use your old lenses with that digital body. Likewise, if your planing on buying a Canon 35mm, then the same goes for a Canon Digital SLR body. Before you buy, take a look at the pros and cons for both systems.

Happy hunting.
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Old Jul 19, 2004, 1:20 PM   #4
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yeap they show me 2 nikon cameras... but it only sums to the confution.

I really dont know too much abaout SLR cameras features. But some friends told me that canon are better and have better lens tnah nikon.

I thin that canon have more variety in SLR cameras and nikon in digital SLR cameras (i really dont like REBERL DIGITAL)
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Old Jul 19, 2004, 1:36 PM   #5
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Rather than spending a lot of money on a camera for a photography course, you may want to look at some less expensive options, too. That way, you could save your money to buy a Digital SLR later.

Heck, I went to a friends wedding yesterday and took photos.For the main ceremony, I used an old Nikon n4004s 35mm SLR, with an inexpensive Sigma 35-70mm lens (one of the older Sigma"Zoom Master" lenses).

You could probably buy this entire setup on the used market for under $200.00. It takes pictures just as nice as a much newer, more expensive model would.

It's not as fast, and doesn't have the "bells, whistles and buzzers", but most users don't need the performance/features of a more expensive model anyway.

My only concern with a very old model, is how much it's really been used.

When comparing 35mm SLR's, unless you really need the more advanced features, given the same lens quality and metering accuracy, one will take just as niceof a photo as another.

After all, despite all of the "bells, whistles and buzzers", the image quality really comes down to proper exposure, proper focusand lens sharpness. With a 35mmSLR, this is simply how long the shutter is open, for a given aperture setting and lighting. Of course, the film you use can make a difference, too.

In contrast, a Digital Camera has much more to deal with (Sensor Type and Quality, how the data from the image sensor is processed, how accurate the camera determines the temperature of the light source, and much, much more.

You don't have to worry about these issues with a film based SLR.

Added:

Reading my post again, I thinkI may have over simplified it a little. For example, you probably would not want to use an old Canon Rangefinder, using aseparate light meter, to determine the correct aperture and shutter speed you'll need to set (manually) for proper exposure. I've actually got one of these in a closet somewhere. :-)

Sure, they can take photos just as nice as any of the newer 35mm cameras. However, they are somewhat inconvenient to use. If you read the reviews of models you are considering, making sure it's got some basic functionality, you can probably find something less expensive that will work fine for your course. I would make sure the camera is in good working condition (with some kind of limited warranty), from a major manufacturer.

Then, I'd make sure it has more than one metering mode (center weighted, matrix and spot), aperture and shutter priority modes, and the ability to set the both the aperture and shutter speed manually. Of course, a built in flash is also desirable, as well as the ability to use an external flash, too. Autofocus is desirable, as well as having Focus Lock (usually with a half press of the shutter button) and Autoexposure Lock features.

After that, most of the rest I'd consider "optional" for most shooting situations (unless you're going to be taking sports photos, etc., where sophisticated autofocus modes (some can lock on to and track your subject), and speed come into play. For a photography course, I doubt you'd need any of these "bells, whistles and buzzers".


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Old Jul 19, 2004, 1:45 PM   #6
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JimC escribió:
Quote:
Rather than spending a lot of money on a camera for a photography course, you may want to look at some less expensive options, too. That way, you could save your money to buy a Digital SLR later.
I dont want a camera for a course... i´m going t finish the course in august... I need the camera to start to work. I need a top of the line amateur camera or a botom of the line profesional camera.

I thinkI will use slide film almost all time. I have to test different brands... somewhere between AGFA, KODAK or FUJI.

My dreamed camera is a nikon F3, but i want something with AF and motor.
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Old Jul 19, 2004, 1:59 PM   #7
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I was editing my last post whileyou were typing, so I didn't see your lastest post until I was finished.

I am not personally familiar with the current SLR offerings. The last SLR I bought was the old Nikon n4004s. I haven't needed anything more sophisticated for my shooting, and it takes photos just as nice as any newer camera would.

Hopefully, some of the other forum posters will be able to help you determine what may give you the best value in a newer 35mm SLR.

Added: Try the "comparison table" at this site, to see feature differences between models. It looks like they allow you to check the cameras you're interested in, pullingup a table showing you how they compare:

http://www.camerareview.com/







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Old Jul 19, 2004, 4:59 PM   #8
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What is your confusion?
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Old Jul 19, 2004, 5:36 PM   #9
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basically the difference between models EOS ELAN 7 and A2, and between A2 and A3.

And if someone knows models similar to that ones from Nikon.
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Old Jul 19, 2004, 6:18 PM   #10
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Ok.

Visit this web site below and type in your cameras. You will get various user opinions. Also, you can click on the highlighted camera name found at the top of the user reviews to get a small spec sheet. Its a start.

http://www.camerareview.com


EDIT: Either click on your format option, or go to the left hand list and select "camera index" from the home page.

Happy hunting.


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