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Old Oct 22, 2004, 9:43 AM   #1
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I enjoy taking pics and want to learn all I can. I
have been on various digicam websites all day and I
think I need to make this decision first as all the
information is overwhelming: DSLR or DSLR-like or
something else all together.

My experience (or lack thereof):
Only with a Canon PowerShot A60 or something like
that...I can't remember, it was 3.1MP. My husband and
I got about 1.5yrs ago. It broke last January, and
I've just been using a Fujifilm FinePix A205 2.0MP DC
we got free with a computer purchase. I have no
experience with lighting, lenses, etc.

My concerns:
I travel a ton. I take all kinds of pics; people
(mostly), action (kids playing soccer/football in
Bali), indoor, outdoor, family, etc.
I want a camera that takes the picture when I want it to...
not 2, 3 seconds later.
I don't print much...but may in the future.
I don't manipulate the photos, yet..I've only done
minor things in iPhoto.
I want the camera to turn on fast.
I'm not that concerned with price, but I don't want
to get something way above my head.
I don't want to deal with different lenses...right
now anyway.

I want a camera I can learn with, and was thinking
about the Canon Rebel, but I'm concerned that this
may be too much camera for a beginner--uh me, because
of different lenses, etc. On one of the many
sites I was on today, someone said that this is a good starter DSLR;
that the kit lens is good for basic photos, but once one is ready
to get more sophisticated, one can go on from there.

Do I really need a DSLR to capture the "moment" or
would a non DSLR or "DSLR-like" camera work just as
well?---I think that's my biggest concern. I've
done OK with pre-focusing the camera I currently have,
but it just doesn't cut it.

Also, I am an American currently in Sydney. If I
purchase a camera here, will the warranty cover me
when I return to the US? (I'm sure a warranty is
different with every camera, but does anyone have
experience with this?).

Thanks in advance







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Old Oct 22, 2004, 9:44 PM   #2
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If you have no interest in lenses, I would think you'd be better off getting a nice point-and-shoot. You can get a smaller, more compact camera at most likely a cheaper price. After researching several point-and-shoots myself, I would say there are a lot of very nice quality ones available.

Bev
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Old Oct 22, 2004, 10:07 PM   #3
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I think digital camera technology has probably come along way since your experiences. You don't have to have a dSLR to get a quick start up and fast shots. I think Sony is among the fastest. Most of Sony's newer cameras have a start up time of about one second and they take pictures with less than a half second delay (the delay can be reduced to almost nothing, 1/10 of a second, by half pressing the shutter to pre-focus). Most dSLR cameras are not doing much better than that. Picture quality is the most important issue to me. There is no question the dSLR is better in that area, but regular digital cams might be coming close. In Steve's review of the Canon G6 he states, "I was very pleased with the overall image quality, it's comparable to the output from more expensive dSLR cameras. Our samples were sharp, nicely saturated, properly exposed and the white balance was right on the money."

I was impressed with the review on the G6... I might get one. The Sony DSC-V3 will be coming out very soon which uses the same 7MP CCD as the Canon G6 and should be an excellent camera as well. Not to mention, both of these cameras are loaded with manual controls if you want to be creative or you can just go fully automatic as simple point and shoot.

Here are the reviews for the Canon G6 and the Sony DSC-V3:
http://www.steves-digicams.com/2004_reviews/g6.html
http://www.steves-digicams.com/2004_reviews/v3.html
The final conclusion (where you'll find some of the most important imformation) isn't finished for the Sony because the production model is not available yet, but it's suppose to be available to the public the end of this month.

I'm sure there are some other great non-dSLR cams out there, but I've been looking for several months now and I've just made a personal decision to narrow it down to these two (you have to narrow it down to something eventually). I would just read as many of Steve's review as you can to make your own decision. Personally I think dSLR's are great, but I think the size would keep me from taking it out and using it as often. One other thing I didn't like about dSLR cams is that you have to use the viewfinder to take pictures... the LCD is for review of pictures already taken. I don't know if that's the case with all dSLR's, but it is the case with the Rebel, and I think it might be the case with all dSLR's.

As for the warranty part of your question... I can't help you.:?:

Hope my other information will help!
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Old Oct 23, 2004, 5:36 PM   #4
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Thanks, I've really been looking at the Canon G6. It looks like it might be the one. I've decided to get my hands on the cameras before I make my final decision...between G6, Pro1, & Rebel.....leaning towards the G6.

Yes you are correct about the dSLRs, MOST LCD's are only for review of the pic you took. I learned this from 1) my experience of watching people take pics yesterday, see note below and 2) from dpreviews' glossary explanation of "viewfinder." By the by, if you haven't tried out dpreview.com's "side-by-side" page, I'd check it out. It really helped me narrow my choices. Added bonus was that if I didn't understand a feature, I could check the "?" located next the fhe feature name and it would bring me to the glossary section of the website with an explanation! I'd go back and delete the camera(s) that didn't the have features I wanted. Great!

Quick note: I feel so pathetic...I took a beautiful ferry ride around Sydney Harbor...and a lot of the time was spent looking at everyones digicams!

Thanks again!
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Old Oct 23, 2004, 5:36 PM   #5
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Sorry I'm new to this forum stuff and it looks like I accidently posted 2wice by hitting back on my browser and I don't know if I can delete this post.
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Old Oct 23, 2004, 9:33 PM   #6
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Did you take a look at the Preview of the Sony V3? It seems like people either love Sony or hate it, but heck they are manufacturing the 7MP CCD that Canon is putting into the G6 so you gotta give'm credit for that.

I don't think your pathetic. I've been a little pre-occupied with digicams for the past several months. It's kinda strange. I think I have spent more time researching cameras than I have when buying cars.

By the way, I have checked out dpreview. I like the site, but not as much as this one. It seems like Steve reviews more cameras and also gets the reviews out a little quicker. dpreview's comparison tool is nice, however.

Anyway, if you get the G6 I'd love to hear what you think. In the meantime I'll be checking this site everyday until the V3 final review comes out.
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Old Oct 24, 2004, 1:06 AM   #7
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I'm just a newbie but I've been doing a lot of research in order to buy my first camera... anyway...

I think a prosumer camera (you know, a high-end consumer-oriented camera) is best for you.
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Old Oct 24, 2004, 3:23 AM   #8
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Dagny, if money is not a concern, the only reason I can think of for not going DSLR is because you don't want to tote around a bulky camera body and multiple lenses.

I recently bought a top-end "compact" - a Canon Powershot Pro 1 - for that very reason. (I have a trip coming up.)

Although it's competent enough, the auto-focus sucks, and without an optical viewfinder, the manual focus is difficult to use. (The Powershot has an electronic TTL which doesn't have enough resolution to give you good focus feedback.)

Don't worry about the Rebel being "too much camera" - you'll rapidly grow into it and it will allow you to continue up a steep learning curve, which a lesser camera might not.
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Old Oct 24, 2004, 8:53 AM   #9
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> Dagny, if money is not a concern, the only reason I can
> think of for not going DSLR is because you don't want to
> tote around a bulky camera body and multiple lenses.

The other reason for not going DSLR is that you don't get to use the LCD as a viewfinder. For quality, you'll obviously want the optical viewfinder and this isn't a concern, but for some photography its a nice feature you can't have by design on the DSLR.

Seth
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Old Oct 24, 2004, 5:49 PM   #10
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sjburges wrote:
Quote:
The other reason for not going DSLR is that you don't get to use the LCD as a viewfinder. For quality, you'll obviously want the optical viewfinder and this isn't a concern, but for some photography its a nice feature you can't have by design on the DSLR.

I don't quite follow, Seth. With a DSLR, you don't need to use the LCD as a viewfinder. You have an optical TTL.
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