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Old Dec 14, 2004, 2:55 PM   #1
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Hi all,

I have an Olympus E20 (but not the tcon-300).

Used to have an Olympus 2100uz.

I am in eternal, internal, endless debate right now re choose of 8800, FZ20 or 7590.

I have three Ultra II 512 CF cards so there is a lean to 8800.

I like the 12x plus IS of FZ20 so there is a lean there.

I have an OlympusB300 tele lens (that could be used on 7590 with adapter) so there is a nod to the 7590.

Soooooooooo...whaddya think???

Quandaries...quandaries...:-?:shock:
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Old Dec 14, 2004, 10:16 PM   #2
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I dont like the image quality of the Kodak 7590, among those three cameras you've picked out, definitively is the poorest....even if I had the Oly B300 I'd never buy that camera.
FZ20 and Nikon 8800 are the best....but the latter is quite expensive, I really dont mind the extra MP - so I'd go for the FZ20....but if you are gonna need big prints no look further and go with the 8800.
I've recentely bought the FZ20, Im not anymore an FZ10_user, I sold it, I hope my new toy arrives on thursday and works flawless.
Whatever, the Nikon 8800 is an awesome camera, even at fine mode, the pictures look great.....the FZ20 is the best long zoom camera by far currently, but within its category (long zoom with small sensor size) IMO the 8800 is in above category because of its larger sensor, its 3 extra MPs and of course the PRICE.
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Old Dec 15, 2004, 2:23 AM   #3
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The DX7590IS a good camera. I've tried Canon, Minolta, Olympus and several others. With the Kodak you can purchase a .7X wide-angle lens for under $200 and have a zoom camera that can take wide-angle pictures. The wide-angle lens for the FZ20 costs $600 CDN. Try several for yourself. Until you do, you won't know for sure.
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Old Dec 15, 2004, 9:27 AM   #4
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coyotegirl wrote:
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The DX7590IS a good camera. I've tried Canon, Minolta, Olympus and several others. With the Kodak you can purchase a .7X wide-angle lens for under $200 and have a zoom camera that can take wide-angle pictures. The wide-angle lens for the FZ20 costs $600 CDN. Try several for yourself. Until you do, you won't know for sure.
Not all the wide angles are going to cost that much for a Pana FZ. If you buy the Pana-made lens, perhaps, but one has many choices available.
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Old Dec 15, 2004, 10:06 AM   #5
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Well, I'd consider the conditions you'll be using a camera in, too. The lens on the Nikon 8800 is relatively slow at longer focal lengths (stops down to a maximum available aperture of f/5.2 at full zoom).

So, the Panasonic's lens would be about 3 times as bright, allowing shutter speeds several times as fast at longer focal lengths (for any given lighting condition and ISO speed).

The Kodak's lens is much brighter than the Nikon's (stops down to f/3.7 at full zoom). But, the Panasonic's lens is still almost twice as bright as the Kodak's at full zoom, and also has the advantage of being stabilized.

None of these models has a lens as bright as your E-20 (f/2.0 at wide angle, which is twice as bright at this focal length compared to the others which start out at f/2.8; and your E-20 only stops down to f/2.4 at full zoom. Your E-20 will also have lower noise compared to these models as ISO speeds are increased.

So, I'd make sure to take lens brightness and noise into consideration when shopping if you plan onusing one in less than optimum lighting where faster shutter speeds may be needed.


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Old Dec 16, 2004, 8:03 AM   #6
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Hello JimC, TacticalNuke, CoyoteGirl and FZ10_user,

Thanks much for all your feedback

JimC...I am especially impressed with your ability to "read" lenses and how they will perform.

After all your great feedback I am leaning towards the FZ20 for the "greater light" at full zoom though I do wish I could take all three "home for the weekend" and then make a decision. Even if I could, local stores currently do not carry any of three digital cameras.






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Old Dec 16, 2004, 8:28 AM   #7
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digcamfan wrote:
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JimC...I am especially impressed with your ability to "read" lenses and how they will perform.

Basically, all I did was "read" the specifications for them. Steve publishes the specs for lenses in his reviews so you can see how bright they are. If he doesn't have the specs listed for a given model, you can usually look at the photos of the lens and see them there.

For example, the Nikon Coolpix 8800 has a lens that is f/2.8-5.2 (meaning that the largest available aperture at wide angle is f/2.8, and the largest available aperture at full zoom is f/5.2). When in between wide angle and zoom, the available apertures will also be in between (smaller than f/2.8, but larger than f/5.2).

Some lenses (i.e., the lens on the Panasonic you're considering) have the ability tomaintain a constant aperture througout their focal range.

Determinghow well one lens will perform compared to another (faster available shutter speeds), for the same ISO speed and lighting, is simply a matter of looking at the largest available apertures at wide angle and full zoom (the way lenses arerated), keeping in mind that aperture is a ratio of the focal length and aperture iris diameter (so larger f/stop numbers are smaller apertures).

The aperture scale (in one stop increments) goes f/1.0, f/1.4, f/2.0, f/2.8, f/4.0, f/5.6, f/8.0, f/11, f/16, f/22, etc. With each one stop move to a smaller aperture (represented by larger f/stop numbers), you will need shutter speeds twice as long for proper exposure.


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