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Old Dec 19, 2004, 3:27 PM   #11
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wow, that really is a noticable difference. Looks like I can scratch the S60. Thanks for the help.
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Old Dec 19, 2004, 4:35 PM   #12
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Well, I personally wouldn't want to actually use ISO 400 on either camera unless absolutely necessary (and then I'd make sure to use noise reduction software like Neat Image or Noiseware). But, the models using the new 7MP 1/1.8" CCD do seem to be improved over models using the 5MP 1/1.8" CCD in the noise department.
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Old Dec 19, 2004, 4:50 PM   #13
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When would you need such a high ISO anyway?
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Old Dec 19, 2004, 5:00 PM   #14
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Jack B. Nimble wrote:
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When would you need such a high ISO anyway?
Higher ISO speeds are useful for increasing shutter speeds in less than optimum lighting to help prevent motion blur from camera shake or subject movement, if you are unable to use a tripod or flash.

Each time you double the ISO speed, the camera can use shutter speeds twice as fast for any given lighting condition and aperture.

For example, in typical indoor lighting, you'd probably need to use ISO 400 without a flash or tripod to keep from having a lot of motion blur (and even then, you'd probably need to keep the lens set at it's full wide angle position where the lens is at it's brightest).

But, when you use a flash indoors (making sure your subjects are within the rated flash range), then shutter speeds are not as critical (since the flash burst is very short, and has the effect of freezing the action). So, many users wouldn't need to use higher ISO speeds. When higher ISO speeds with low noise are needed (i.e., existing light photos of moving subjects without a flash or tripod), a DSLR is the recommended solution (they can shoot athigher ISO speeds with lower noise levels, thanks to their larger sensors).

But, despite the noise levels, some users do need to increase ISO speeds from time to time with the non-DSLR models when subjects are outside of the flash range in lower light, in order to get fast enough shutter speeds to minimize motion blur. So, a model with lower noise is desirable.
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Old Dec 19, 2004, 11:05 PM   #15
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Thank you very much Mr. Mod for all your input. So it looks like I'm basically looking for something with a range of ISOs and a small amount of noise. That puts the S70 at the top of the list as far as I can tell. Even so, if anyone has any info about the others that hasn't been mentioned yet, it would be much appreciated.

Thanks -Jack
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Old Dec 21, 2004, 10:27 AM   #16
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It is only the Ixus (or Elph in the USA) range that has the E18 problem. The bigger cameras like the A95 etc. don't suffer. It seems from the forum that there are more and more people suffering (like me) from blurred flash shots with the Sony P150, so until this problem has been sorted I would not recommend it, even though it is very portable and handy. I shall be in the USA in January and a Canon S70 is top of my shopping list since it is nearly half the price there than in Europe. The P150 does not have manual control, and for my money the S70 is twice the P150 in quality, features and performance.
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Old Dec 21, 2004, 1:39 PM   #17
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After extensive research, I just ordered the Fuji F810 (same as E550 with a better chassis and modes) which is identical in size and prrice with the Sony 150. The F810 takes noticably more detailed photos and has some other superior manual modes. The detail of the F810 in sample phots is incredible, probably due to it's low noise. It shows every pore and baby hair in portraits, details which most cameras process out with thier noise.

In a feature and quality comparison, I found it to be the best for the size. The Sony lens is exceptional can't be beat in regards to complete absence of purple fringing, and if placed on the F810 would make the perfect compact IMO. However, the Fuji , is better overall for CCD quality, flash, screen, modes, controls and features IMO.

I'll review it throughly once I've received it as I'm currently going off detailed reviews and sample pictures, very extensivly though.
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Old Dec 21, 2004, 1:39 PM   #18
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Actually, I went to Ritz yesterday, and ended up purchasing the S70! So far, I am extreemly happy with it, and I'd like to thank everyone in this forum for helping me decide on it. I'll get back to you guys with any comments on it once I figure everything about the little thing out (why would I possibly read the directions? I'm a guy).
:-)-Jack
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