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Old Jan 12, 2005, 5:14 PM   #1
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OK, I know the Rebel is more expensive (around $1000)... and is an SLR... but what are the real advantages?



I own a canon powershot a80 and love it, but want to get more seriously into photography without breaking the bank.



Any suggestions or info is greatly appreciated!
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Old Jan 13, 2005, 8:19 AM   #2
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1. Optical through-the-lens viewfinder

2. Interchangeable lenses

3. Perservation of investment in lenses as you advance bodies

4. Larger image sensor -> better quality& lower noise

5. High ISO capability (with noise)

6. Lower shutter lag (probably)

I hope that the 300D replacement, which is speculated to be announced in February, will add further improvements, in speed, focusing, and flash performance.

I would also say that SLR's are for people who wish to make an effort to learn the capabilities of the cameras and to take advantage of interchangeable lenses to make specific choices, and to build and maintain a collection of lenses over times.

If you want to point & shoot, get one -- don't get an SLR. If you want "full control" of the image and image making for now and the long run, then an SLR is better for you. That said, many point & shoot cameras give you close to "full control". But that's not how they're typically used and intended to be used, whereas the opposite is true with SLR's, and the better ones make manual control convenient.

One test is -- are you willing to look at the wide range of lenses available to try to make sense of what the best lens choices are for the long run, even considering third party vendors, and esp. considering the costs? If not, then you're probably better off with the Pro-1's built-in lens. It's a bit of a shame to have the capability of a DSLR for the wide range of lenses, many bad, many excellent, and to simply pick what's available in the low-end of that range. This doesn't mean that you should immediately drop $1000 or so more into a DSLR's lenses. This doesn't mean that all cheap lenses are garbage. But if you don't ever see yourself spending more than $300 let's say, then I would say that you're not really looking to take advantage of the capabilities and intent of SLR's.
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Old Jan 13, 2005, 10:03 AM   #3
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300D is quite cheap if you can use the canon's rebate. But I think if you need "full control" SLR, don't buy rebel, get something like 10D/20D or D70.
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Old Jan 13, 2005, 10:41 AM   #4
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Canon Powershot Pro1 has a bunch of "shortcomings" so I would either look at its competitors (eg. Olympus 8080, etc) or wait until a new version comes out...

The base prices between the low-end DSLRs (eg. Canon 300D Digital Rebel) and high-end prosumers (eg. Pro1) is not that different. Where the DSLRs will cost more is when you try to replicate the prosumer features. For example, if I'm not mistaken, Pro1 has 7x zoom so you would need to buy a zoom lens for your DSLR, if you wanted to replicate the features.

Jumping to DSLR is a big step and requires commitment--both in terms of money and time. The key advantage of a DSLR is that they let you change lenses to suit your interest (eg. you like landscapes, get a really wide-angle lens; you like zoom, get a good telephoto lens; etc) and let you take better pics in low-light with faster shutter speed. The key downside is that they are more expensive and bulky/large. If you are serious about photography, perhaps a DSLR is best. Decide on a lens system (Canon, Nikon, Pentax, whatever) and then pick a camera...
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Old Jan 13, 2005, 10:44 AM   #5
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Thanks for the help guys!

I really wanted something i could either have full control of (been using full manual cameras on an amature level since highschool), but can double as something the wife can use if she needs.



although the a80 becomes her cam if i get a new one, it would be nice for her to be able to use it easily too.

i bought her a nikon fm10 film camera for x-mas when she wanted a camera about 5 years ago, and she never used it and always had me take pictures, since she would just get frustrated with it.
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Old Jan 13, 2005, 4:48 PM   #6
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Quote:
300D is quite cheap if you can use the canon's rebate. But I think if you need "full control" SLR, don't buy rebel, get something like 10D/20D or D70.

Many people prefer cameras such as the 10D and the 20D. I admit that I like my 20D better. I also recommend holding off the 300D at this time, because I think that a replacement is due.

However, I disagree with the above statement. Part of the wonder of the 300D is that it was a fully capable camera at the lowest price in its day. I think it was a very reasonable choice for saving money, and also a reasonable choice for those who expect DSLR's to improve shortly, and don't wish to sink a lot of money in their early choices.

I must admit that if you wanted mirror lock up (MLU) or in-camera flash exposure compensation (FEC), you would have to get the hacked firmware. This is a choice that many people made. Moreover, many professional cameras in their day, such as the F1-n, did not have either of those features, and they're not features that everyone needs every day -- I have rarely used them in the 300D. I do like the availability of MLU though, and esp. the way that it's implemented for example in Contax cameras -- automatically enabled when you use a timer mode.
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Old Jan 13, 2005, 5:14 PM   #7
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Luxowell wrote:
Quote:
I really wanted something i could either have full control of (been using full manual cameras on an amature level since highschool), but can double as something the wife can use if she needs.


although the a80 becomes her cam if i get a new one, it would be nice for her to be able to use it easily too.

Well, if you want to let others use your camera, then perhaps a dSLR isn't the best choice. I have a Digital Rebel (300D) and I gave it to my mother, on auto mode, to take some pictures. She was overwhelmed and didn't know what to do-- even though a dSLR on auto is not that different from many point and shoots today (except for the lack of a servo zoom on the lens). To people who just want to click a shutter, they're frightening. Then again, a big prosumer digital in a "system" that someone's unfamiliar with might be overwhelming too...


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Old Jan 13, 2005, 8:37 PM   #8
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well, let me clarify...



my wife isn't a camera idiot... she just doesn't like fooling with apature and shutter speed settings.



and, come to think of it... i would love to be able to switch to "real" lenses (vs. the ones that sort of "snap on" to the a80).

Maybe I'll wait for a new rebel... although it WOULD be nice to try and get one before I take my work trip to Photoshop World.
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