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Old Feb 4, 2005, 8:44 AM   #1
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Hello- And Thank you in advance for any help they may be offered. This is my problem. I have been searching for about 3mo for the right camera for me and I have decided its not out there or I can't find it. So maybe someone here can help. What I want is really quite simple :

1) EASY TO USE- I don'twant to have to adjust the settings. I just like to point and shoot.

2)MUST TAKE GOOD INDOOR SHOTS- Most of the pictures I take are of my children, a lot of them are taken indoors.

Basically that is it.Not to much to ask? As for the price I would like to stay underor around$500.00 so that should give me plenty of choices.Megapixels no less than 5.As for the size I would like to have a more smaller compact camera (so its easy to take places) but I have looked a the Kodak dx750 (because of the larger lens, thinking it would let more light in for better indoor shots) and that size would be OK. Now I did purchase the Sony dsc p150 thinking it would be great. Only had it about 3 days when they announced the p200 so I took it back and decided to see what came of that before I made my final choice. As for the p150 while I had it I don't think I took 1 good picture. So I probably want be looking a the p200, I don't think? I really liked the p150, I liked everything about it other than the picture quality. Like I said I take a lot of pictures indoors and all of them came out dark. I don't want to have to play with the settings (just point and shot in auto mode) so I don't think this is the camera for me. What about the Kodak dx750 or one of the new z cameras that are out? They have a larger lens so would that help with the dark indoor picture problem? I don't know which camera I should be looking at all I know is this quest for a camera is about to drain all my engery! This is so hard!! PLEASE ANYBODY HELP!! Oh I have also been looking at the Canon and Olympus line too, but you can not stamp the date on photos like you can with Sony and Kodak. Thats kind of an important feature too!

THANK YOU to anyone who has taken the time to read this. I know it is a lot! Jvan:?
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Old Feb 4, 2005, 11:29 AM   #2
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Maybeif Imake this shorter someone will respond. PLEASE help me find the best camera for me. Qualifications:

1) Easy to use - I want to just point and shoot, not have to make manual adjustments

2)Takes good indoor shots - Most of my pictures are of my children a lot are indoors. I don't want the pictures to come out dark.

Size, I would like it to be more compact, but I have looked at the Kodak dx750 and it would be OK. Price, under or around $500.00. Megapixels, no less than 5. Finally brand, does not really matter, I have looked at Sony, Nikon, Kodak, Olympus and Canon. Canon and Olympus doesn't imprint the date like the other ones and I do really like that feature. One more thing, Am I right when I am thinking the larger the lens the more light that comes into the camera (such as the Kodak dx750 vs. Sony p150) which will not make the indoor shots so dark?

Ok maybe this is alittle shorter (not much) but I'm trying. Thanks for any help! jvan:?
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Old Feb 4, 2005, 5:57 PM   #3
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I would suggest the Canon A95

jvan wrote:
Quote:
1) Easy to use - I want to just point and shoot, not have to make manual adjustments.
Quote:
Fully automatic, but with plenty of manual features. Please don't discount a camera for having manual settings, once you've got into it you will welcome the option to play and learn.
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2)Takes good indoor shots - Most of my pictures are of my children a lot are indoors. I don't want the pictures to come out dark.
Quote:
Very good in low light conditions with focus assist lamp.
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Price, under or around $500.00. Megapixels, no less than 5.
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Within price range at approx $300.00/$350.00. Will allow funds for extra battery and cf cards.
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Canon and Olympus doesn't imprint the date like the other ones and I do really like that feature.
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Imprinting the date onto your images can quite often spoil the picture. You can always write the date and other info on the back of the print when it is fully dry.
Quote:
One more thing, Am I right when I am thinking the larger the lens the more light that comes into the camera (such as the Kodak dx750 vs. Sony p150) which will not make the indoor shots so dark?
Quote:
Larger aperture, signified by the lower value, eg f/2.8 on the A95. (good), allows more light in.
Recommend you read Steve's review here, http://www.steves-digicams.com/2004_...s/a95_pg7.html


Hope this helps,

Stevekin.
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Old Feb 4, 2005, 6:01 PM   #4
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All consumer and prosumer digicams, as opposed to DSLRs, have problems indoors (ie. low-light). Even high-end prosumers (not DSLR) that cost $1000 have problems in low-light. Your performance with the P150 will be similar to other cameras. Some will be better but not by much.

If you are a newbie and if you want indoor pics, shoot with flash. Flash will overcome all the indoor light problems. As long as you stay within flash range (usually around 2 to 3 meters), you'll be ok.... However, using the flash is not the same thing as taking a non-flash pic. Non-flash pics capture the ambience better, whereas flash produces a "lighted" bright background.... In any case, if you use flash then any camera with decent flash is good indoors.

jvan wrote:
Quote:
1) Easy to use - I want to just point and shoot, not have to make manual adjustments
All cameras have easy-to-use automatic features and modes. Some of them might be a bit easier to use (eg. Kodaks) but it is pretty minor. If a camera has manual modes, it'll be on top of the newbie-friendly-auto modes. So you are not losing anything (except paying more in money or size by getting one with more manual controls).

Furthermore, nearly all cameras come with USB (or Firewire) ports so connecting to a computer is easy too.

Quote:
2)Takes good indoor shots - Most of my pictures are of my children a lot are indoors. I don't want the pictures to come out dark.
This is tough if you don't use flash. I think other cameras will behave similarly to the Sony P150 (which is actually a good camera). Don't expect anything...


Quote:
Size, I would like it to be more compact, but I have looked at the Kodak dx750 and it would be OK.
Smaller cameras (i.e. ultra-compacts) tend to be more expensive for a given feature and have less manual controls. If size is not a concern then you should get one of hte bigger ones. That is, avoid ultra-compacts and go for compacts and SLR-like cameras. In any case, this is a personal preference...

Quote:
Price, under or around $500.00.
You can get low-end to mid-end consumers and prosumers for roughly that much.

Quote:
Megapixels, no less than 5.
Why do you want no less than 5? How about 4?

Quote:
Canon and Olympus doesn't imprint the date like the other ones and I do really like that feature.
If you have a computer, you can get simple, free, utilities that imprint the date. But if you don't have a computer and if you like this feature, then you'll be happier getting a camera with it...

Quote:
One more thing, Am I right when I am thinking the larger the lens the more light that comes into the camera (such as the Kodak dx750 vs. Sony p150) which will not make the indoor shots so dark?
Not really... What you should look at is the "F value" that is imprinted on the lens/camera. For example, you would see something like F2.8 or F2.0 or whatever. The smaller the number, the more light it lets in and better it is. Usually the F number will be given with a range eg. F2.8-3.1 on my Canon S1 IS. F2.8 is at wide angle (no zoom) and F3.1 is at telephoto (maximum zoom). You basically want a camera with very low F-stop and hopefully very low also at maximum zoom. You'll find that cheaper cameras' F numbers increase like crazy when you zoom whereas the good ones have low F numbers and/or increase slowly as you zoom.

If size doesn't matter then I think you should get one of the larger ones. THe Sony P150 is definitely on the smaller end (although not as small as the ultra-compacts like Canon SD300 or Sony T1). If you can use flash, then use it indoors and everything will be ok; but if you can't use flash, you'll have difficulties taking indoor pics with any camera.
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Old Feb 4, 2005, 10:44 PM   #5
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GREAT ADVICE! Thank you both so much. I am a newbie that is why I wanted to keep it simple. And I had no idea about that F value, I will start looking at that.

Thanks again!!
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Old Feb 4, 2005, 10:56 PM   #6
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Minolta G400....
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Old Feb 12, 2005, 2:36 AM   #7
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I have the Canon S1 IS and I like everything except the redeye reduction since it doesn't work.



It has alot of settings but also has an auto function which is real easy. Also I like having AA batteries instead of a proprietary battery pack.
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