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Old Feb 10, 2005, 11:28 PM   #1
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I am taking a vacation trip to China, and would like a digital camera to replace my 35 mm manul focus SLR for this trip. After having studied ultra-zooms (Olympus C-770, Panasonic FZ-20, Minolta Z3), I now realize that I might want more wide angle, and some zoom, but not ultra zoom. I don't care about the video function. Suggestions?

Thanks!
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Old Feb 10, 2005, 11:31 PM   #2
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olympus c-5060 or the new c-7070 (if its on the shelves).. solid as a rock.. good manual controls.. excellent pictures and features.. can't go wrong...
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Old Feb 10, 2005, 11:34 PM   #3
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Konica Minolta DiMAGE A200. . .awesome camera with a 28-200 zoom.
great manual controls, everything you could want. . .EVEN Anti Shake
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Old Feb 10, 2005, 11:46 PM   #4
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I keep reading about image stablization, and that the Olympus cams don't have. If I'm used to shooting a manual slr, that has no image stablizer, should I be concerned? What about for low light, meaning indoors, like homes?
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Old Feb 11, 2005, 12:11 AM   #5
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i wouldnt let that be the sole determinent of your camera selection... they can be helpful in low light situations when the subject is not moving.. but it is no substitute for a fast lens, as even if you do get a sharp picture due to image stabilization, if the subject is moving, you will still get motion blur.. so how helpful it is really depends on your subject matter.. if you shoot mostly action or in daylight, you will see no difference.. why i suggested the olympus 7070 and 5060 is their durability, coming from an all magnesium frame, their picture quality which is sharp and vibrant indoors and out, a great built in flash more powerful than most plus a hotshoe, and manual controls that are not unfamiliar to those using slrs, it is also a frequent choice of professionals for a compact "street camera".. and they have a constant f2.8 lens.. which is FAST....

that said, if you look into the matter and decide you need anti shake.. you will not be disapointed in the aforementioned minolta a200..


hope that this helps answer more questions than it raises...

enjoy, Dustin

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Old Feb 11, 2005, 8:44 PM   #6
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How much are you willing to spend?

If you can't afford the high-end prosumers then the mid-end ones like Canon G6 or Sony V3 are best... but these don't have 28mm wide-angle (they are somewhere in the low 30's so it's not THAT great but oh well)...

If you can afford the high-end prosumers, the benchmark seems to be the Olympus 8080 (although it has flaws like all the high-end prosumers)... Nikon 8800 is also worth considering since it has image stabilization but I'm not sure how good it is...
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Old Feb 11, 2005, 9:09 PM   #7
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Hards80 wrote:
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if you shoot mostly action or in daylight, you will see no difference.. why i suggested the olympus 7070 and 5060
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[snip]
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and they have a constant f2.8 lens.. which is FAST
Neither one of these models (Olympus C-5060WZ, C-7070WZ) have a constant f/2.8 aperture.

They are only f/2.8 at their wide angle lens setting, and have alargest available aperture of f/4.8 at full zoom. So, almost 3 times as much light can reach the sensor through the lens at the wide angle lens setting, using the largest available aperture compared to full zoom.

This is typical for a compact digital camera (smaller available aperture, represented by a larger f/stop number,as more zoom is used).


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Old Feb 11, 2005, 9:59 PM   #8
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poppop wrote:
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I keep reading about image stablization, and that the Olympus cams don't have. If I'm used to shooting a manual slr, that has no image stablizer, should I be concerned? What about for low light, meaning indoors, like homes?
You often have a faster lens with a SLR than you can get with a prosumer level digital camera. You can also usually get better results with higher ISO films than you can with small sensor digitals with the ISO cranked up. The upshot is that stabilization is a necessity for indoor shots without a flash or tripod. Even with stabilization it is difficult.

The A200 drops off only to f3.5 at full zoom, which isn't bad. Coming from SLR you will appreciate the large manual zoom ring and all of the physical controls.

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