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Old Feb 26, 2005, 11:24 PM   #31
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sw2cam wrote:
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"Bad Run" who else is going to repeat that phraze used first by Lady. Assemble your own phrases, don't repest what other say.
:?: :|

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Old Feb 26, 2005, 11:26 PM   #32
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sw2cam wrote:
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No I'll not wait for another CANON cam to be released. It's kinda like baseball three strikes and your out. CANON your out.
Since when is buying a camera the same as baseball?
Looks like you're the one who is OUT.

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Old Feb 26, 2005, 11:30 PM   #33
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No one expects you to go out and buy a Canon after your luck, however it does not mean that all canons will be the same. From what I have seen of all brands, they can all have what I call "lemons" just like cars, some people never have a problem with fords yet some people have no end of problems but it does not make all Fords bad cars, do you see what Im getting at? Seems like you got the lemons,:roll: Ive never been unlucky with Canon or know of anyone who has had a serious problem with the their products, I often wonder about what happens in transport though, Im a courier and i see how fast shipments have to be moved of all manner of products, I also see a number of things damaged in transport.



PS my Canon G3 is a trooper of a camera, I keep it in the van I drive for work (its my second digital after an A10) now that I have a rebel as my main camera. The G3 rolls around on the floor under the drivers seat, takes numerous knocks and bumps and still produces wonderful shots.
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Old Feb 26, 2005, 11:31 PM   #34
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sw2cam wrote:
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"Bad Run" who else is going to repeat that phraze used first by ALadyForty. Assemble your own.
"Bad run" is a common phraSe used in English. I will use that phrase as often as I wish.:blah:

What country are you originally from?
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Old Feb 26, 2005, 11:42 PM   #35
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aladyforty wrote:
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No one expects you to go out and buy a Canon after your luck, however it does not mean that all canons will be the same. From what I have seen of all brands, they can all have what I call "lemons" just like cars, some people never have a problem with fords yet some people have no end of problems but it does not make all Fords bad cars, do you see what Im getting at?
Precisely, very good point.
Further to the Ford example, companies can have largescale call-backs for safety issues, much like what happened with Ford recently. Though, this does not mean the company is bad, I would still drive a Ford, may not prefer one, but wouldn't mind. This is largely contrasted with 'lemons' (also a common North American term), in which case, small numbers of products may become defective. I stress small. Sometimes these items may be errors due to the manufacturer or not. Mishandling by shopkeepers (dropping the box), stockers, transit, temperature shock, electric shock, static shock (from warehouses), can all be possible culprits for the creation of lemons. I have used the A75 and the A95 and they have both been wonderful cameras. I went for the G3 and never looked back since. Sure, Olympus and Fujifilm are good companies, but I trust Canon more. All the professionals I have worked with all choose Canon for its fine optics, and high quality.







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Old Feb 26, 2005, 11:52 PM   #36
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Ponin wrote:
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I went for the G3 and never looked back since. Sure, Olympus and Fujifilm are good companies, but I trust Canon more. All the professionals I have worked with all choose Canon for its fine optics, and high quality.

Im not really sure about which is best, My local camera dealer is also a photographer, he prefers his Nikon's (probably after years of collecting the lenses that eventually fit his digitalSLRs) yet he sells heaps more Canon cameras, I think Fuji is also one of his best sellers too. When i purchased my digital rebel I did a lot of research online and he really wanted to sell me the Nikon counterpart but did concede that both cameras had good and bad points and that both cameras were a worthwhile investment. I was happy that he acted unbiased even though he is a Nikon fan, for this reason I now buy follow up products from him for my camera and may well purchase any other camera in the future from him.

For the Original poster in this thread, I hope you get a great camera with no problems whatever your choice:-)


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Old Feb 27, 2005, 12:02 AM   #37
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Sure, Nikon is a good company. Some people I know use some Nikon equipment. They take pictures of celebrities and use great big lenses. They take good enough photos sometimes to sell for a few thousand dollars.

Again, my sample size is small, not large enough to make generalizations about the quality of a company. Many professional photographers I work with use Canon. But this is not enough to generalize about all professionals. Although, a larger sample size is the past Olympics where 70% (or more) of the photographers present used Canon cameras.

I prefer Canon and will probably never use anything else, but for whoever is reading this, you can't go wrong with either Canon or Nikon.
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Old Feb 28, 2005, 9:17 AM   #38
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Ponin,

I think you're having an effect on me. After posting recently that I don't think I can take a chance on the Rebel XT, I think I may just do it. The D70 or XT? - it's a win-win situation, really. Both cameras will be excellent, and after having some time to reflect(and hearing your 'voice' in my head about image quality), I'm leaning towards the XT.

Like I said, it's win-win. I'll let you know how it goes.
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Old Feb 28, 2005, 10:29 AM   #39
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You need to anser two important questions before you buy. First, how big am I likely to print these pictures (or, alternatively, how big of a file size do you need) and second, how much am I willing to spend on a body, and or a body+lenses/other accessories.

Lots of people expound on the benefits of more megapixels, but generally unless you are pinting really large prints (for ex. 20x30) you don't really need a camera with more than 6.0 megapixel camera.

The most important thing you can do is go to a camera store and play with the cameras. Would you buy a new car based on nothing but the reviews you had read? Or would you test drive the car as well?

Next, it is important to remember that just like there are luxury car makers other than BMW and Merceded, there are other camera manufacturers other than Canon and Nikon. This is not to say that Canon, Nikon, BMW etc.. don't make spectacular products (and I have used both Nikon and Canon equipment), but it is important to remember that other camera makers may make cameras more suited to your needs and/or budget.

If low cost is especially, important, in addition to the digital rebel and D70, the Pentax *ist D is also an option. You may like its feel better. You may not. Just try it.

If you have a problem with camera shake, or shoot off tripod a lot, chances are you will want either a lens based anti-shake system or a body based system. Addressing shake on a lens by lens basis can get expensive (Canon and NIkon add about $500 for such an option compared to other similar lenses they make). The Minolta 7D offers such a system in its body, meaning that EVERY lens is suddenly VR/IS. If you have multiple lenses, the savings add up quickly. Moreover, a lot of people like the feel of the Minolta 7D - calling it a camera made by photographers for other photographers. Maybe that set-up will appeal to you - it did to me.

Maybe you will not like the compromises that Canon, Nikon et al have made in adjusting legacy film systems to a digital world. Maybe then the Olympus E-1 and its unique sensor cleaning system will appeal to you. Maybe you will like the ergonomics of it best of all. Go and try it.

Most of all, don't wait for the perfect camera. There is always a new better version of something approaching. If the time comes where you need the new better version, upgrade. But in the meantime measure your needs and resources, go try the available options, and choose. You cannot really make a poor choice anymore. But the choice has to be correct for you.
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Old Feb 28, 2005, 2:58 PM   #40
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Ponin/jcharding,

You asked for some details about the use of the camera last week.

In the beginning, I was thinking digitalSLR all the way, then considered prosumer 8MP megazoomers, but dropped that line of thinking. For a few hundred more, I'll get a much better camera that handles the conditions I'm most often shooting in.

Anyway, I'll be shooting mainly social events, speakers at a lecturn and portraits. Much of it is indoor work and sadly, not very visually exciting. (Someone can/will suggest to me that it's up to the photographer to make the pix exciting but I'm not that good, so I digress...). So much of the work is in decent, but not exceptional light - hence one of the reasons toI moved away from prosumers.

Other things toconsider:
- There is no money in the budget, either now or in the future, for additional lenses.
- I'm printing pixs at 300 dpi so 6MP vs. 8MP matters
- I need to get a camera before the end of March
- total cost for ext. Flash, CF card, extra battery for the Rebel XT (I can get all that for about $2,000

Any dSLR I eventually end up with will be more camera than I need, but as I said, for a prosumer that gives me most of what I need/want, it's only a few hundred cheaper, but not worth the savings. I've briefly tried out the *ist and the Olympus E300, but wasn't impressed. My choice is between the D70 and the Canon Rebel XT.

I'm waiting for the Rebel to come out, see some reviews and try it out. If it's XT, I'll order it before the end of March - I don't care if I won't get it for a while, as long as I know it's coming - and the budget won't be a concern.

So, I've got a couple of questions about the Canon.What's a decent external flash for it? Any ideahow much the 17-85 lens you mentioned costs (your advice is great, Ponin, as I wasn't sold on the 18-55 lens sold with the Rebel)?Idid a quick searchof a local dealer's site but saw no such lens...

If I can get the Canon with all the goodies for about $2,000, I'll probably go that way.

Sorry for the rambling.
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