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Old Mar 26, 2005, 4:37 PM   #1
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Hi,:?

I'm happy to have recently joined this forum and give great KUDO's to this website!!!!

After lengthy research, reading so many reviews etc...I think (or at least I think) I've narrowed down my purchasing decision to the Canon G6, S1 or A95. I realize there are variances in the features. My confusion comes into what seems to be the big focus on the megapixel variance, the 3 vs. the 5 etc. I like the fact that the S1 has the 10x zoom, but am I sacrificing the megapixels that the G6 and the A95 have. I'm not a expert photographer but want a little more than just point and shoot without getting too overwhelmed.

I would LOVE anyone(s) opinion on which avenue to take!! If I'm offbase with just focusing on Canon than I welcome that feedback as well!!!

Thanks much!!

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Old Mar 26, 2005, 5:45 PM   #2
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The Canon G6 is going to be the nicest camera of the bunch between the models you're considering (brightest lens, lowest noise, hotshoe for an external flash, etc.). -- unless you need more optical zoom.

Of course, it's also the most money. ;-)

As far as Megapixels, I wouldn't let that be a deciding factor unless large prints are needed. Even 3 Megapixels is plenty for prints up to about 8x10".

However, you do have a lot of differences other than Megapixels between these models... For example, the S1 IS is the only one with a stabilized zoom lens, and it's got a much longer lens (more magnification) compared to the others. However, one of it's weaknesses is that it does not have an Autofocus Assist Lamp (which can mean it has more difficulty focusing indoors).

I'd give a lot of thought to how you want to use a camera (indoor photos, outdoor photos of wildlife, etc.) to help you decide how much optical zoom you really need.

I'd also make sure to try them out in a store. You want to make sure you're comfortable with a camera's ergonomics, viewfinder, menu and control layout, speed of operation, etc.

When reading the reviews here, make sure to pay close attention to the review conclusion sections (where you'll see things like startup time, autofocus speed and reliability, cycle time between photos, etc. discussed).


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Old Mar 26, 2005, 5:52 PM   #3
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Maybe put the Panasonic FZ20 on your radar screen.

The FZ20 has a 12x zoom.

Very good camera.

Another very good quality camera with a low price is the Fuji S7000.

- Terry


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Old Mar 26, 2005, 5:52 PM   #4
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Deebee,

I'm replying to your post, not because I'm a digital camera expert, but I, like you, agonized over my camera selection. I researched it to death...reading reviews, going to stores and playing with different models, lurking in forums like this one, talking to friends and co-workers about their cameras, looking at thousands of digital pictures, and so on. By the time I was ready to buy, the new models were out, and the process started over again. I finally made a list of "must have" features, and a maximum price (not a range). The price had to include required accessories, such as a memory card, a case, and a UV filter.

I needed a mega-zoom (minimum of 10x), a minimum 4 MP, a decent video ability, great picture quality, short lag times, ability to use AA NiMh batteries, and it had to cost no more than $350.00. That eliminated a whole lot of cameras from contention! I actually was able to pare it down to just 4 cameras. The final decision was made, oddly enough, by the fact that when I picked up my camera for the first time, it seemed to jump right into my hand...perfect fit, perfect balance. I could turn it on, zoom it, and take a picture with one hand...sold!

My camera is a Fuji FinePix S5100. I've had it for a month now, and I love it. It takes awesome pictures, and has all of the features I wanted. I had to shop pretty hard to get it in under my price max, but I eventually succeeded.

Try making a list...put down all those features you must have - don't settle for less. Once you have it down, don't be swayed by another camera - stick to the list.

Good luck...let us know which one you choose.

the Hun
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Old Mar 26, 2005, 8:37 PM   #5
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I really appreciate the feedback. Who would have ever guessed picking the right camera could be so time consuming and agonizing.I find myself getting caught up in analysis paralysis!! It's worse than picking out a computer and we all know that no matter what you pick there will always be a newer more robust and for less $$ camera right about the corner. :-)

I will predominantly be using the camera for scenery photos and occasional indoors (Holiday get togethers).From the input it sounds like I don't need to get caught up in the megapixels as I don't plan on doing much beyond an 8 x 10 and very few of those at that.

I was just curious as to why so many of the reviews (including Steve's) are so very keen on the Canon A95?? I was started to feel if I chose something other than that I would be making a mistake.

Thanks again!!!

Debbie
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Old Mar 26, 2005, 9:33 PM   #6
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Debbie:

There is no perfect camera for all users and shooting conditions.

So, it can be tough trying to decide what is best for your needs (especially if this is your first Digital Camera, since you won't know what you like and dislike about the features a given model may have).

When choosing a camera, you compromise (size, weight, features, cost, etc.).

The model that works best forindoor portraits,may not be the one that works best for photographing wildlife, and vice-versa.

The reason that so many people probably like the A95, is that it's as reasonably small camera, yet has a lot of manual control (Aperture Priority, Shutter Priority, etc.) as well as the ability to use add-on lens accessories. Most smaller models don't have these features. So, it's well liked in it's class.

Again, I'd encourage you to "test drive" some of the cameras you're looking at in a store. That way, you'd get a better feel for the differences (size, weight, viewfinder, control and menu layout, optical zoom, speed of operation, etc.).

Many stores have demo cameras for this purpose.

I'd alsosuggest that you don'tget too caught upin which model has the most features, unless you see a need for them. Ditto for megapixels.

I'd be more concerned about image quality (which really has little to do with the number of megapixels if you don't need large prints), useability (viewfinder, lcd display, control layout, speed of operation), size, weight, etc. Of course, what one user likes, another may not.
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Old Mar 29, 2005, 8:14 AM   #7
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Thank you Jim....I will be taking the "test drive" this week!!
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Old Mar 29, 2005, 10:47 AM   #8
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JimC, please could you give me a little bit of advice? I've posted a message but have had no replies!



Which is the best camera for indoor shots? I'm really stuck and it's not helping as Im about to set up as a WAHM (working at home mum).....




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Old Mar 29, 2005, 11:33 AM   #9
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Leatherlite, as several posters told Debbie there is no 'perfect' camera. I've owned several and fallen in most of the pits there are to fall in.

If the majority of your pictures will be indoors look the hardest at cameras that have a 'hotshoe' mount, so that you will be able to add an external flash at some point. Most indoor photos really need that extra light to capture a 'real' photo of your subject. I use a Canon G3 for my indoor photography and the Canon S1 IS for outdoor photography. The G3 has the hotshoe where the S1 does not and the S1 has the lens power where the G3 does not.

But after that it's what camera fits your budget and feels the best in your hand that counts. Good Hunting.


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Old Mar 29, 2005, 3:28 PM   #10
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Hi deebee,

Even I was confused in selecting the Digital Camera like you... Still caught with the Megapixel mania... Would appreciate if you can share your views once you test drive S1 or A95... All I would like to know is the picture quality of S1 at its max resolution and the same picture with same resolution in A95... Would appreciate if you can share your inputs... Also I'm curious how the Indoor shots come in S1... Read it reviews about AF... If you had an opportunity to test that plz do share it here... It will be really helpful...

Thanks

newdc


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