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Old Apr 25, 2005, 7:21 AM   #1
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Hi everyone,
i purchased a 350d 3 weeks ago..........loads of dust etc on the sensor......i got a replacement and that was worse......so ive kinda lost faith in the dslr market.Im a novice at photography but i didnt expect to spend that much money on a camera and have unclear images.
Im mostly working in studios and home interiors shooting full figure,2/3 etc.
I just want to get the clearest,best looking shots possible.
I have looked at some prosumer cameras...8800 coolpix,oly 8080 and dimage a200.....and also im looking at the oly e300.....ive totally lost faith in canon with my 350d purchase.
So can anyone please help me out...........do i really need the flexibility of a dslr.i mean if im only shooting inside and at studio do i really need the option of all the other lenses?Im itching to buy a new camera as my money is here burning a hole in my pocket...........thanks in advance for any advice.
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Old Apr 25, 2005, 8:50 AM   #2
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Hi: I don't know the prices in Europe, but I purchased a Olympus C8080 and have been very pleased with it. I still own 4 otherdigicams, but like using the Oly the best. No worry about dust, and the lens is great. Photo quality is suburb. I like it's handling, and for what you described, it should work well for you.

Good luck,

Steven R.
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Old Apr 25, 2005, 11:20 AM   #3
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I, too, have been debating whether to go the DSLR or prosumer route. For example, will a Canon G6 give picture qualityas good as the D300? I don't use long telephotos or very wide angles so I wouldn't expect to want to change lenses
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Old Apr 25, 2005, 6:04 PM   #4
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photopaque wrote:
Quote:
i purchased a 350d 3 weeks ago..........loads of dust etc on the sensor......i got a replacement and that was worse......so ive kinda lost faith in the dslr market.Im a novice at photography but i didnt expect to spend that much money on a camera and have unclear images.
It's unfortunate that you had dust onthe sensor. But,why not simply clean it (or if you're not comfortable with this, have a dealer clean it for you)?

If using Sensor Swabs and Eclipse is not appealing, there is a news release about a new product called DSLRClean™ on our March breaking news page.



I've seen Steve (the site owner here)post that he has personally used this new product and likes it.

If dust manages to get sucked into a non-DSLR model and gets on the sensor, it usually requires a trip back to the manufacturer. It doesn't happen often, but it does happen.

Ditto for brand new cameras (you sometimes see users report dust on the sensors with both newnon-DSLR and DSLR models). At least with a DSLR (where you can easily get to the sensor), you can clean it yourself if you're careful.

Quote:
Im mostly working in studios and home interiors shooting full figure,2/3 etc.
For portraiture, I'd lean towards a DSLR. With a non-DSLR model, you have dramatically greater depth of field for any given 35mm equivalent focal length, focus distance and aperture. That's because theirsmaller sensors can use a much shorter actual focal length lens, for any given angle of view/35mm equivalent focal length. If you want more depth of field, this is great. But, for portraiture, you usually want less depth of field.

So, it can be very difficult to blur backgrounds using a larger aperture tohelp subjects stand out from distracting backgrounds with a non-DSLR model. Their Depth of Field is simply too great (especially for your 3/4 length and larger portraiture examples). A DSLR model is much better for this particular use.

Also, you have higher noise levels with a non-DSLR model (becausetheir smaller sensorsrequire more amplification of their signal for equivalent ISO speed sensitivty, since their smaller photosites don't generate a strong enough signal in lower light).

This can make itdifficult to shoot non-stationary subjects via existing light indoors, without increasing ISO speeds to the pointnoise (similar to film grain) becomes noticeable, and/or where in camera noise reduction starts reducing detail.

In contrast, you can get a very bright and inexpensive 50mm f/1.8 lens for a DSLR for existing light shooting, using higher ISO speeds when needed with lower noise levels compared to the non-DSLR offerings. Make sure to take lens needs into consideration when buying a DSLR. I'd suggest visiting the manufacturer specific lens forums for tips on lens selection if you go that route.

Neither camera is perfect for all conditions, but I'd leanverystrongly towards a DSLR for portraiture.

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