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Old Apr 28, 2005, 6:41 PM   #1
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I'm thinking of buying a digital camera...since the prices are falling so rapidly, should I get a 5 or 7 Meg camera...I heard a 7 will allow me to crop part of a photo and blow it up to an 8 x 10 inch picture better than a 5 Meg camera...is that a fact? Or should I just get a 5 Meg?:?
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Old Apr 28, 2005, 7:38 PM   #2
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In general, more megapixels means more possibilities to crop. However, there are many other things to consider, too: lens quality, portability, zoom range, ability to take decent pictures in low light, shutter lag, price of requisite memory cards, durability.

Since you are "the coach", I assume you may want to take some shots of some of your players. In that case,you would probably want something with a fairly short shutter lag.

How much do you want to spend? What (mainly) do you want to take pictures of? What is your experience with photography in general? If you answer these questions, I think people can give you more specific and more useful advice.

Just off the top of my head, I would say that the Olympus Sport Zoom C-5500 might be a camera to consider. 5 megapixels. 5X optical zoom. About $300 online, $350 at regular retail stores.http://www.dealtime.com/xPC-Camedia_...7896688~AT-DDn

You can read Steve's review at:

http://www.steves-digicams.com/2005_reviews/c5500.html



Good luck!
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Old Apr 29, 2005, 6:16 AM   #3
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i had the Minolta 5mp F300 camera. Just like other prosumer cameras, i got so sick of not being able to take photos indoors. Look for a good quality lens before anything else.
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Old Apr 29, 2005, 8:30 AM   #4
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The Coach wrote:
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I'm thinking of buying a digital camera...since the prices are falling so rapidly, should I get a 5 or 7 Meg camera...I heard a 7 will allow me to crop part of a photo and blow it up to an 8 x 10 inch picture better than a 5 Meg camera...is that a fact? Or should I just get a 5 Meg?:?
Well, cropping reduces the resolution more than most people realize. If you crop an image to make it look like twice as much optical zoom is used, you end up with 1/4 the original resolution (because like area, total image resolution in pixels is based on multiplying width x height).

But, there is not a lot of difference between 5 and 7 Megapixels either. A typical 2592x1944 image from a 5 megapixel model would give you approximately 243 pixels per inch after cropping for the correct aspect ratio (ratio of width to height) for an 8x10" print.

A typical 3072 x 2304 image from a 7 Megapixel model would give you approximately 288 pixels per inch after cropping for the correct aspect ratio (ratio of width to height) for an 8x10" print.

So, you're looking at an increase of less than 16% in pixels per inch representing your subject.

As a general rule, I think that 3 Megapixels is enoughfor verygood quality8x10" prints (which works out to around 192 Pixels Per Inch from a typical 3 Megapixel model at 8x10" print size after cropping).

But, if you cropped an image from a 7 Megapixel model to make it look like twice as much optical zoom was used, you'd end up with only 144 Pixels per inch representing your subject at 8x10" print size.

Now, you can interpolate an image to help prevent pixelation at larger print sizes, but this does not increase the detail captured. A lot depends on the subject type, too. Some photos will interpolate better than others (depending on the percentage of the frame occupied by the subject, how many pixels were representing your subject, subject, type, etc.). For example, a head and shoulders portrait tends to enlarge much better than a landscape containing fine detail.

Basically, you don't want to try cropping an image to simulate more optical zoom, any more than necessary.

I'd give users more information on the conditions you'll be using a camera in. For example, if you plan on using it for capturing indoor sporting events without a flash, then you probably won't get good results with any of the prosumer models (because shutter speeds would be too slow to prevent motion blur from camera and subject movement).


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Old May 1, 2005, 9:29 AM   #5
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Thankyou!
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Old May 1, 2005, 9:31 AM   #6
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Thanks a lot, it's a big help...I'll be taking pictures of scenery mostly...Europe...so I don't need one for the indoors too much.


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Old May 1, 2005, 9:34 AM   #7
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Thanks for your help, but NO, I won't be taking pictures of my players, that's not the case any more...I'll be taking pictures of scenery in Europe mainly...any comments on the Sony DSC-W5? or the Nikon 5900??
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Old May 1, 2005, 11:28 AM   #8
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In good light, the differences between camera models tends to diminish. Light is a camera's best friend. ;-)

So, for outdoor scenes, many would work fine.

I'd spend some time looking at the sample photos in the reviews here to see what you think looks best.

I'd pay attention to thiings like corner softness (which can be worse with smaller cameras), and how well things like fine detail are portrayed in an image.

Unfortunately, the models you are looking at have not been reviewed here. But, you may be able to find some user albums with photos from them at one of the photo sharing sites. Pbase has a camera database at http://www.pbase.com/camerasso you can find albums taken with many camera models. But, keep in mind that the photographer's skill and lighting has a lot to do with the images you see and images posted may have been enhanced with software by the album owners.

I'd also make sure to try out cameras you're interested in (many stores have demo models), since there can be a big difference in ergonomics, menu and control layout, etc.

The models you're looking at now don't give you the fine control you have with more advanced models (better control over the camera selectionsvia Aperture Priority mode, shutter priority mode, etc.). But, you may or may not care about these types of things.


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Old May 4, 2005, 5:37 PM   #9
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JimC,

For the qualities you've mentioned, which camera(s) would you select? I know you've been asked this a thousand times...by the way, I know the two i mentioned are NOT reviewed here yet, but you did review the Sony W1 and Nikon 5200, so...

Portability and ease of useare alsofactors for us...
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Old May 4, 2005, 9:38 PM   #10
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Nice explanation, JimC. One of the deciding factors for me is the interface. Are you compfortable with how the camera functions and making adjustments. Also, can you make your adjustments quickly once you learn the camera. These are the main reasons I chose my Fuji over my canon.
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