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Old Jun 27, 2005, 10:17 AM   #1
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Decesions, decesions!

I need one pocket camera to complement my main camera panasonic FZ-20. I am a little dilly dallying between these three. Any help in this regard will be welcome.

SonyP200- 7 MP, Fast, Excellent Battery life, Good daylight shooting, not much noise.

Fuji F10- 6.3 MP, Reasonably fast, Usable upto ISO1600. N0 noise at normal ISO. Excellent low light shooting.

Panasonic Fx8- OIS, sharp lens, reasonably fast. decent battery life. not so good in low light.


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Old Jun 27, 2005, 11:50 AM   #2
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IMO, it really comes down to what features are most important to you. The only real advantage the F10 has over the P200 is low light capability. This might be a huge advantage to you though. Huge enough to choose it. The same goes for the FX8 but, between the F10 and the FX8, I would prefer getting low light performance from better ISO settings than image stabilization. Higher ISO's mean higher shutter speeds and less chance of moving subjects blurring. It's like choosing a fast lens over one with IS.

I have the P200 and have been extremely happy with it. It has features that let me compensate for most shooting conditions. It also lets me get somewhat creative. The features I most like about the P200 are: 7mp resolution; very good lens; LCD is well protected; manual focus presets; spot metering/focus ability; full manual mode; up to 30 second shutter speed; will take flash shots up to 1/1000th second shutter speed in manual mode; battery life is fantastic; live histogram; displays shutter/aperture settings etc. BEFORE picture is taken; has many lens add-on accessories; power-on time is very quick. IMO, these features make the P200 a VERY versatile camera for an ultra compact. There really aren't many situations I run into that it can't handle. I find I use it much more than our DSLR because its convenience is addictive.

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Old Jun 27, 2005, 12:43 PM   #3
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I had the same delema, and picguy is right. it really does come down to what you want. The P200 offers more manual modes, which you might appreciate. It has a viewfinder, which lots of people find to be a must have. AND takes additional lenses, if you feel like lugging them around. I needed something that was essentially a point and shoot, and I loved the idea of having the low light feature, as well as the best quality pictures I could find, so I went with the Fuji (waiting for delivery).
As far as I know they're all great cameras, although I don't know much, if anything about the Fx8. At this point, it all boils down to what elements you want.
Try doing a pro/con list for these. It really set matters into perspective for me.
I hope that helps a little bit.
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Old Jun 27, 2005, 1:28 PM   #4
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Thanks guys for your prompt responce. Ah! so it is again down to poor me to judge what is good for me. I would love to have the high ISO and NO NOISE of Fuji but P200 is so sturdy and versatile. Why cant' they just get together and design a camera which has everything(Just Joking):blah:. I think I will use the great corporate decesion maker( flip of a coin) to decide the issue.:-)

Anyways, HAPPY SHOOTING:|
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Old Jun 27, 2005, 2:02 PM   #5
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The FX8 and F10 share a couple of disadvantages I'm not particularly fond of. Both are point and shoot and have no optical finder.

Both have advantages. The FX8 will take stabilized movies at full VGA. That should make the movies a lot smoother. For static subjects in available limited light the stabilization would let you shoot at lower ISO and get good images. But the F10 higher ISO capabilities give you more versatility for subjects that aren't still. It also extends the flash to impressive ranges – albeit with some noise.

In the dpreview conclusions on the FX7 Simon said: ",,, made worse by the lack of an optical viewfinder and, ironically, the problem of camera shake, which would doubtless make the FX7 unusuable in all but the brightest conditions if it weren't for the image stabilization system." Basically he was saying that the stabilization just about made up for the poor holding position with no viewfinder. The same would hold true for the F10. I ran some tests trying to hold a movie steady using the viewfinder and LCD on my Z750. Bracing your elbows into your chest I found I couldn't see a lot of difference in the steadiness. I think maybe Simon just didn't try very hard. You can get a little more steadiness with the viewfinder but not a lot with a little camera.

But visibility in bright sunlight is a problem. Neither have transreflective LCDs. I don't know why that trend fell by the wayside, but it is the only LCD that is really good in sunlight. In the dpreview conclusions on the F10 he listed a disadvantage of the F10 of the viewfinder being hard to see in bright light. I think the FX is a tad brighter, but none of the LCDs that aren't transreflective are very good – even with anti-reflective coatings. LCD only might be OK in Ireland where the sun isn't out a lot, but not too great if you live in or plan to vacation in a sunny climate.

There was an interesting post on the Casio forum. Someone had a Z750 and was using the nice 2.5 inch LCD to frame rather than the small optical finder. He took it to his kid's baseball game and couldn't quickly capture action until he switched to the optical finder. Even at only 3X it can be hard to quickly acquire a target. The problem would be exacerbated in bright light. He might have done better with more practice, but I like an optical finder if things are dynamic.

Of the two I think the F10 offers more versatility if you aren't big into movies. I wouldn't consider the FX8 until some good reviews were out. They seem to have made some improvements, but if the LCD still doesn't gain up in low light it would be a bear to frame your flash shots. While you are waiting for the FX8 to become available and some good reviews Fuji might put that great sensor in a useable camera.

The P200 is an overall competent camera. It is the only small camera other than the P150 that isn't prone to red eye. You have good manual exposure modes and some pre-set focus distances. For flash shots in bright lighting with subject movement you might want to switch to manual shutter – some people are getting ghosts at 1/40 sec. It was a hard choice for me between the P200 and the Z750.

The Z750 has a small viewfinder with no diopter correction. I wouldn't recommend it to anyone who wears eyeglasses for distance vision. Otherwise it is a nifty little camera. The buffer in the movie mode is great. You can wait for something to happen and then push the record button. It records the previous 5 seconds and continues recording, so you don't have to grind away until the kid does the cute thing again or the chameleon finally grabs the bug. The control setup is great. You will be amazed how much easier it is to set things than with your FX20 – I have an FZ10. I also like being able to keep a large photo album in the permanent memory and have custom settings with a picture to remind you of the situation of the settings. This may be a little over-enthusiastic but he covers the features well: http://www.kenrockwell.com/casio/exz750.htm#intro

Quote:
Why cant' they just get together and design a camera which has everything
Hear Hear! I would love to have stabilization or that great Fuji sensor in my Z750. It would be a tough choice between the two. I've grown to love stabilization as you probably have, and it would be great for full VGA movies. But the high ISO capability might be more versatile if you exclude the movies.


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Old Jun 28, 2005, 11:08 AM   #6
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My grab it quick digital camera, when I don't want to pull out my dSLR ios a Fuji F-10, which is a great little camera. It is worth a loot and it has great capabilities. Here is a sample photo.

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Old Jul 3, 2005, 12:40 PM   #7
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Thanks guys for all the help. I am still torn between P200 and F-10 but slowly leaning towards F10.
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Old Jul 3, 2005, 2:21 PM   #8
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I have the same dilemma. But my choices are Casio Z750, Fuji F10 and Sony P200, in the order of preference.

I like Z750 because it is the smallest camera among all three of them. You can easily carry it in a pocket, which would be hard to do with F10 and P200 without strecthing your pocket.

I like Fuji F10 because of lower noise in high ISO settings and the longest battery life among these three cameras. But, it has a cheap plastic body and 0.2" thicker than Casio. Plus, judging by the sample photos at dcresource.com, it has way too much purple fringing for my eyes. It also lacks some of the manual controls that the other two cameras have.

I like Sony P200 because it does not have the red eye problem. But I don't like their proprietary memory stick card.If I go on the trip and need to buy more memory, I can always findCF and SD cards at a local gift shop and never memory sticks. As far as the image quality is concerned, Z750 and P200 use the same 7.2mp sensor made by Sony.

Any thoughts about the three cameras?
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Old Jul 3, 2005, 4:19 PM   #9
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It really is a tough choice. If I were buying today it would probably come down to the P200 and Z750. The F10 has the hogher ISO settings but doesn't have a view finder. While this isn't a problem for lower light shooting it can cause some problems framing shots taken in bright sunlight.

Personally, I would wait to see what the upcoming Olympus Stylus 800 has to offer. It has an 8mp sensor, high ISO settings, a great LCD display that is easily seen in bright sunlight among other interesting features. i just found out about it recently. It is supposed to be out sometime this month.
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