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Old Jul 24, 2005, 6:12 PM   #1
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Hello,

I'm searching for the first digital camera for me, I have choosed the F10 or the EX-Z750. But I cannot decide me, what's the better camera for me. I'm looking for a compact camera, which have a good macro mode and which is good for photographing landscapes and sometimes some partypics.
Which of this 2 cameras can handle this better (especially the macro mode)?
Or you know another (better) camera for this things?
I read/hear alot of the lens error problem of the z750 and that sounds not good to me...:roll:
I hope anybody can help me in my choose and I say THX in advance...

Many Greetings,

Chris


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Old Jul 24, 2005, 7:37 PM   #2
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I would recommend the F10. I bought one for my wife and I found myself using it quite a bit. In the forum at dpreview.com, there are many macros taken with the F10 that are posted, much more than one would expect. The macros that I have seen ranges from your usual flowers, bugs, and even flying insects (though they are not flying). As for "partypics" there is no better lowlight camera than the F10 outside of dslr's. As for landscapes, the lens is your standard 35-105 zoom. The F10 takes excellent pictures but not wide-angle pictures. Quite a few owners of the F10 also have DSLR's. Can you say that about any other P&S camera? The Casio is an excellent camera though it doesn't stand out in the areas that you deemed important to you.
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Old Jul 26, 2005, 12:31 AM   #3
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The Fuji F-10 is an absolutely amazing digital camera. You cannot go wrong in choosing it.

Here is a sample macro photo from the Fuji F-10.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jul 26, 2005, 1:52 AM   #4
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my apologies, for that last post of my camera 4 sell. i did not mean to post that in the main forumn.

-jon rowe
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Old Jul 26, 2005, 12:43 PM   #5
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Macro mode on the Z750 goes only to 10cm. It is nice that you can focus from 10cm to infinity in normal shooting modes without having to select a special macro mode, but 10cm isn't as close as some cameras can focus. That distance works fine for me. I have cameras with super micro modes and have never found much use for them. But if you are into bugs and stuff the Z750 isn't the best choice.

The F10 doesn't use its flash very well at very close ranges, but few cameras do. If you can provide light it does a very good job for extreme macro shots.

Since you have the F10 as a choice I suppose you don't need a viewfinder or manual controls. I can't get by without a viewfinder but I live in a sunny climate. Neither camera has an LCD that is easy to see in bright light.

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Old Jul 27, 2005, 10:09 PM   #6
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Slipe-

Sometimes you have to think a bit outside of the box. Yes, I agree that an optical viewfinder is a nice accessory. However, is it really necessary? Many digit cameras are coming out without optical viewfinders, such as the Fuji F-10 and the Olmypus Stylus 800.

Both of the cameras noted above are setting records for their high ISO capability, the battery endurance, and their photo quality without noise. At some point, folks will truly realize that the field of consumer point and shoot digital cameras have changed dramatically.

Here is an Olympus Stylus 800 photo that makes the best use of its 8mp image.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jul 29, 2005, 4:36 PM   #7
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What was ISO for this shot. I'm trying to decide between the Stylus 800 and Fuji F-10.
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Old Jul 29, 2005, 10:37 PM   #8
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Hi Sarah Joyce - it isn't a matter of thinking outside the box for me. You have to understand that we live in different climates. I take most of my pictures out in the sun and can't get by without an optical viewfinder.

Simon at dpreview in his conclusions on the F10 listed as one of the disadvantages of the camera that the LCD is difficult to see in bright light. Steve seemed to like it OK, but I've used other cameras Steve said was easy to see in bright light and I had to shade the LCD to make settings. Steve evidently has very good eyes. I asked on several boards whatever happened to transreflective displays, but nobody seemed to know why the dropped them.

I do a lot of toddler shooting as well and it is very hard to follow them zoomed out using the LCD. There is a post at dpreview from someone who evidently used only the LCD on his Z750 until he tried to shoot his son's baseball game. He was missing most of the action trying to use the LCD. He said he understood why he needed the viewfinder.

I also like to have manual modes on a camera. You can do a lot with a good P&S though. If you have a live histogram and instant EV buttons available you can keep from blowing highlights just as well as with manual controls. Sports mode is just as good as aperture priority on most cameras for optimizing your shutter speeds. It is a little harder to blur the background on a portrait without manual focus, but you can pre-focus on your subject and then step back a little to work the DOF. There are ways around just about everything, but I prefer doing it the old fashioned way.

That ISO 1600 flower shot from the Stylus 800 looks a little rough to me even at 600 pixels display. It is pretty hard to evaluate the noise at that size. I wish all cameras gave the ability to completely disable the in-camera noise reduction. I would prefer to do it myself with a sophisticated Photoshop noise reduction plug-in.

I could think outside the box on the manual controls, but not the viewfinder. Even if they got viewfinders that were actually good in the bright sun I don't follow action very well with them. Practice might improve that though. I see no reason to get a camera without a viewfinder as long as good cameras are available with them. The trend with the Z750 and V550 to put a small viewfinder and still give you a 2.5 inch LCD on tiny cameras is a good one. I find the little viewfinder sufficient, although I wish they had been able to put a spot focusing target in it. The V550 viewfinder might actually be decent in sunlight, but it is hard to know without taking one out into the sun yourself. The reviewers have lowered their standards so much it is hard to tell when a really good one comes along. Maybe if one comes along that is actually good in sunlight they could say something like "it is really really really good in sunlight" to differentiate them from those that are good in bright sunlight that you can't see.

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Old Aug 30, 2005, 1:28 PM   #9
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Good points about the view finder, now I need one on my FinePix F-10 :?

But the F-10 is the best low light point and shoot there is out there, and yes the Stylus 800 sucks compared to the F-10. I love shooting pictures without flash esp. of my 1year old daughter and baby niece .


But you are definitely correct that you can't see anything with the sun shining right on it (Steve must have really good eyes/sunglasses). But here on the East Coast the F-10 is the best choice with a super battery life the LCD uses is not an issue there.

I'm not sure what Sarah sees in the Stylus 800, most of the scene setting and above 400ISO changes the picture into a 3.2MP piece of crap. Don't waste your money.
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Old Aug 30, 2005, 1:47 PM   #10
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slipe wrote:
Quote:
The reviewers have lowered their standards so much it is hard to tell when a really good one comes along. Maybe if one comes along that is actually good in sunlight they could say something like "it is really really really good in sunlight" to differentiate them from those that are good in bright sunlight that you can't see.
LOL

I had to chuckle at that one. It may me think of a thread I was reading recently about why only the "dogs" don't get a Recommended or Highly Recommended at certain sites (rarely do you see a "below average". Of course, some of that is because only cameras from major manufactures are usually reviewed (and there is a lot of junk on the market).

Read Phil's review of the Kodak DCS Pro 520 from 1999 when you get a chance. Check out the conclusion: "Most, Hugely, Very, Highly recommended" :lol:

It came to mind when you mentioned saying something like "it is really really really good in sunlight" ifa decent display comes along.


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