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Old Aug 8, 2005, 4:24 AM   #1
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What's a good price for the Nikon D50?
I am in Asia, and I found it for:
US$ 680 body
700 kit
from camera shops (can see and test) and take home at once.

My questions:


What do you think of the above prices?? Reasonable? I do not mind warranty issues.

Not sure whether I could get a better price in the US, but for sure it's much better than in Europe!

Japan, HK or Thailand might give me an even better price I guess, but I am not sure when I am passing by there next. I've seen higher lower prices on the internet but... If I add taxes and freight and after reading the reviews of some online shops I am somewhat skeptical.

I'm new to photography & Digital photography, so I am not sure I would even tell the difference between a good lens and a bad one right now, but thinking about the future, is it worth thinking ahead and worry about the lens? Will I go safe with the kit or shall I opt for D50 body plus another lens? Which do you recommend? My budget is around US$ 900 max. altogether. I do want to keep my camera for many years to come if possible, and make the most of it in most conditions.

Sorry for the many questions.


As many out there, I'm also considering also the Canon 350D... Looks pretty good.
Best prices:
US$ 800 kit
750


Again, as many said, I tried them in my hands, and I like the Nikon much better, but I was somewhat convinced by the many arguments around about the Canon's superiority.
Correct me if I am wrong, but Canon features:

-lower ISO (isn't this useful?)
-lower overall noise (is this the case?Can one easily tell)

-higher resolution and sharpness (I read bad reports on the kit lens for the Canon, that would affect sharpenss I believe?)
-good WB tuning

Cons:
-very uncomfortable in my hands (but I guess I'd get used to it...)
-slightly more expensive
-seems to require more photoshop to improve pics...

Where does the 50D stand out?


At the same time, spending 100 bucks less and getting a good lens on the Nikon does not sound totally pointless too, also considering that at my level, either cameras would work just fine.
Can anybody help me out with things to keep in mind before jumping into this?

Thanks,
Daniel
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Old Aug 8, 2005, 6:22 AM   #2
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Iso refers to sensitivity to light. In film, lower ISO's meant lower grain. As iso's increase, low light performance improves as one can use faster shutter speeds (lessening the chance of camera shake). This also helps freeze motion in action shots. The same is true in digital cameras, except instead of grain, the tradeoff for speed is digital noise.

In the D50, one can choose from 4 ISO's 200, 400, 800, and 1600. In small digicams, ISO's above 100 typically exhibit signs of noise, and virtually become unusable at 400 or above. This is in part due to smaller sensors. In DSLR's the imaging sensor is much larger..hence performance is much better at higher ISO's.In the D50, noise is virtually absent at 200, and barely noticeable at 400. Noise is present, but image quality is still good at 800, and even pictures at 1600 are usable. This gives the d50 excellent low light performance and allows you to shoot in tough, dimly lit situations.

I can't speak for Canon (I am a Nikon/Sony user), but the higher ISO's are not a disadvantage in the D50 (at least in terms of image quality)
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Old Aug 8, 2005, 6:32 AM   #3
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Thanks. Basically you are saying, you do not need 100 ISO?

I just wondered why Canon has 100 ISO and more expensive cameras even 50 ISO, whereas with the Nikon you start at 200 ISO. Anyway, for me it's the same, I just want to understand what are the differences between the D50 and the 350D and which one is a good investment for my budget.


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Old Aug 8, 2005, 7:40 AM   #4
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The lower iso's do give you a little more flexibilty, especially when shooting outside in bright light, allowing you to shoot wide open(or at least with larger aperatures)with slower shutter speeds to control depth of field. If you're shooting portraits outside, you will appreciate having lower Iso's. An advanced shooter might find the D50 somewhat limiting with only 4 ISO's. However the average photographer probably won't notice a difference.

In terms of image quality, I don't think you'll find the lower Iso's to be significantly better.
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Old Aug 8, 2005, 10:08 AM   #5
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thanks again! I get the point. I do NOT need to worry then!!

Since you mention you are a "Nikon man", if I do decide to go for the D50, which lens would you recommend in the US$ 300 max. range ?
Are Nikon lenses the best for nikon cameras???

I need something general which allows me flexibility of use, and good and sharp quality of image...
I would be shooting mainly naturalistic and city views, some portraits, no indoors, in mainly temperate/warm climates. I would like to experiment with various types of light settings. I want a lens that I can keep in the future too.
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