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Old Aug 18, 2005, 4:34 AM   #1
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Hello, New on this forum. :?



1- CURRENT situation, 2 cameras:

-> Canon EOS 500N (Reflex) w. Canon 28-80 & 75-300 mm
-> Canon Powershot S30 (Compact DIGITAL)


2- TARGET situation, 2 cameras:


-> Keeping Canon Powershot S30 (always practical to have a pocket digital camera)

-> Upgrading Canon EOS 500 N to digital


3- HOW to upgrade Canon EOS 500 to Digital, 2 solutions?


3.1 Canon EOS Digital accepting my EOS 500 lenses:

-> Canon EOS 350D or 20D

I know some Film LENSES CAN BE RE-USED ON A DIGITAL MODEL. Not sure how mine would do though


3.2 POWERFUL non-SLR DIGITAL:

->Fujifilm FinePix S9500

Ilike the idead of having one body with one fixed lens only without extra bulk and risk of spoiling optics when having to switch between 2 lenses, as well as extra functionalities (tilting TFT screen, video...)

To balance with

Extra manual setups or picture quality offered by adSLR (here, Canon EOS 350D or 20D)



My favorite editing software is ACDSee PowerPack 7 ( http://www.acdsystems.com/English/Pr...LAN=englishX70 )


Thanks in advance for any piece of advice, experience!

Me: :?

You: :idea:



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Old Aug 19, 2005, 6:32 AM   #2
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Gaul

I am a big fan of the Fuji S9000 but... a Canon 350D with the kit 18mm-55mm lens (which apparently has been greatly improved) along with the lenses you have now, would be a more capable package than the S9000.

To explain, the Fuji attains high ISO through its internal processing (and a new super CCD chip), the Canon gets it through the large sensor (larger individual photosites [pixels] mean they can collect more light, and therefore produce less of the random noise).

The Fuji offers 28-300mm in 35mm equivalent, the Canon with its image factor of about 1.5, would reach from 27mm to 450mm with the kit lens plus your lenses, a significant advantage on the telephoto end. If changing lenses is not an issue for you than the advantage is still Canon's. BTW, your lenses should work fine on the digital Canon bodies.

The Fuji uses AA-sized batteries and stores on both xD and CF cards, the Canon uses a Li-ion pack, but can be fitted with a power grip which includes AA compatibility and a portrait grip, and it uses CF cards. No real issues here.

The Fuji does not have image stabilization, the Canon can be equipped with an IS lens, but at a very high price. It does however have the option so advantage Canon.

The Fuji, as a closed unit, should have no serious issues with sensor dust, the Canon, as a DSLR, has some vulnerability every time you change lenses, so you must get the correct tools and learn how to properly clean the sensor. Some people rightly point out that if the Fuji does get dirt on the sensor it is an expensive repair job to fix it (and a dust particle which would show up as a small spot on the Canon's images would be a much bigger problem with the far smaller sensor of the Fuji), however remember that this is not likely to happen unless you work in environments with a lot of very fine dust.

The Fuji has a very slight advantage in resolution (12.5% from 8 MP to 9 MP) which is not really significant, even in large prints.

Price wise the two packages should be within a reasonable amount of each other. So I believe your biggest decision here is do you want to carry a camera bag with extralenses, which will need changing for some shots, or would you prefer an all-in-one camera which covers all of the focal lengths you were familiar with in 35mm? And of course there is the fact that if you carry a DSLR you are often taken more seriously by others, this DSLR "snob-factor" may sound frivolous but in some situations it can work in your favour (on the negative side, thieves are more likely to recognize the Canon name, and equate larger cameras and camera bags with higher income for them).

I used film SLRs since 1978, I now use a Fuji S7000 almost exclusively. The DSLRs are faster, offer a better viewfinder (although LCD is only for playback review), take noise free pictures at "normal" ISOs, and offermore flexibility. The Fuji has freed me from lens changing, and a heavy camera bag (plus the bonus of LCD as viewfinder and video clips). Comparing my images to the DSLRs I am familiar with (a Pentax *istDS and a Canon 20D) I do not find much difference except in low light ( although the 20D with a Sigma 70-200mm f2.8 was really good), not enough for me to go back to the big camera bag. To me the S9000 represents a faster camera startup with a real zoom ring, the biggest issues I currently have with the S7000, so it may be the camera for me, but I have been around photography for a long time and I know what I will use this camera for, if you are less certain than a camera with more growth potential (the 350D) may be more appropriate for you.

Well I guess that is as clear as mud:? I will watch this thread and answer any questions that I can.

Ira
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Old Aug 19, 2005, 6:43 AM   #3
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Ira, thanks again for your very useful knowledge :!:, which I appreciate very much because it's based not only on technical skills but also on experience of photography. I agree with you that pure performance is not everything; day-to-day practicality has to enter the contest too.
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Old Aug 19, 2005, 7:53 AM   #4
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As you say Ira, if I take the dSLR route and the cheapest one, I will finish with 3 lenses.

If I choose the popular Canon EF-S 17 - 85 mm IS USM, I would have only 2 lenses, one of which with image stabilization and superb optics quality.

But then adding this lens alone is same price as buying a camera like the Fuji S9000.




I am tempted, only tempted yet,to sell my Canon EOS 500 N with all original kit, 2 lenses, bag...

The body only is worth maybe $50 maximum...

and go for a fixed lens model.



I think I have to investigate further the choices I have regarding lenses, which could balance strongly my final choice.This 10-22 mm lens looks nice too (as the 17-85 mm):

http://www.dpreview.com/news/0408/04..._efs_flash.asp



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Old Aug 19, 2005, 8:15 AM   #5
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Gaul

I am in a similar situation. I have a Minolta Maxxum/Dynax 7000 and a 5000along with an 18-35mm Phoenix, 35-70mm Minolta, 50mm Minolta, and 70-210mm Minolta lenses. The flash units are obsolete anyway so I won't even mention those. I could get a new Konica/Minolta 7D or the new 5D and have a very complete kit. Then I lift the old camera bag and wonder how much this would sell for by the kilogram.:roll:

I really don't think I want to carry this all around anymore. I am an amateur photographer who does an occasional wedding (only when asked), and I hope to sell some prints of local sights at craft fairs. I will never be a professional photographer, but if things change in the future I will deal with them then. I can get the images I want and need nowfrom the all-in-one cameras so I am in no hurry to get a DSLR.

I will always want a film SLR on hand for the occasional very long exposures (star trails, meteor showers) which do not lend themselves well for digital unless you are into the pro level equipment. So I guess the Minolta bag will slip back into the closet and leave me with one more future option.

Ira
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Old Aug 19, 2005, 11:20 AM   #6
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I see what you mean.

Also looking for a coherent and mid-term (have you noticed how I won't say long-term... mid-term being 5 years until this full-frame body) solution there.

Now, for the mid-term,if Igo down the dSLR route, it has to be more than marginally better than a camera like the Fuji S9000, which means go for new lenses with image stabilization. I don't want to start with the 18-55 mm from Canon as too many users finished to upgrade and ditch this lens. I would at least buy theCanon EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 Image Stabilised USM lens...


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Old Aug 19, 2005, 12:22 PM   #7
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If you are referring (by full frame) to the Canon 1D? with the 35mm sized sensor, then be careful to buy lenses that are still compatible with the film camera. Canon has chosen to build lenses specific to the APS sensor sized cameras (Rebels, 10D, 20D, etc) which will not work (vignette problem) on the large sensor 1D cameras. I am not sure if that is what you are referring to but if it is then check the lenses you want to be certain that they are 35mm compatible. The kit lens with the 350D is not.

Although the S9000 is the choice I would make right now, it seems that your plan is for more involvement in photography, in which case a DSLR may be in order. Remember one more thing, if you bought just a 350D body, it would cost little more than the S9000 would and with your present lenses you would cover from 42mm up to 450mm and you could then get a lens to cover the wide angle later.

Hope I don't sound like I am trying to talk you out of the S9000, but with your present equipment this is a valid alternative.

Ira
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Old Aug 19, 2005, 12:33 PM   #8
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When I mentioned full-frame, it was not for today.



If I go with the Canon EOS 350D, I think I will also buy a Canon EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 Image Stabilised USM lens and stick with the 75-300 I got with the 500 N

In order to have no more than 2 lenses and a good optic as the basis of my main requirements, with added benefit of image stabilization.



I will wait for the S9000 release anyway and decide soon afterwards. I cannot compare all competitors from the S9000 and consider that if the S9000 disappoints, I will definitively buy a dSLR.

If I am impressed by the S9000, I will not invest in a dSLR but in a S9000 or equivalent competitor.



Thanks again
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Old Sep 7, 2005, 4:17 AM   #9
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Monza76 wrote:
Quote:
If you are referring (by full frame) to the Canon 1D? with the 35mm sized sensor, then be careful to buy lenses that are still compatible with the film camera. Canon has chosen to build lenses specific to the APS sensor sized cameras (Rebels, 10D, 20D, etc) which will not work (vignette problem) on the large sensor 1D cameras. I am not sure if that is what you are referring to but if it is then check the lenses you want to be certain that they are 35mm compatible. The kit lens with the 350D is not.


I was referring to the Canon EOS 5D:

http://www.dpreview.com/news/0508/05...canoneos5d.asp



I am therefore not sure it's wise to invest in a 350D or 20D and new lenses if Canon cannot decide on which type of lenses to use. They just kill themain advantage of a dSLR - its upgrade potential - by introducing a new camera with a "full-frame" sensor after having promoted sensors with a 1.5 factor for years.



The all-in-one approach is therefore even more compelling.

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Old Sep 7, 2005, 9:32 AM   #10
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gaul

I wouldn't make any decisions until I had seen some reviews. The comments I have read by new S9X00 owners are inconclusive since many people have been so totally hyped on this camera that it cannot possibly live up to their expectations. Honestly a good EVF camera will have about 90% of the flexibility that is achieved with a DSLR, unless you have a huge budget, in which case you can invest in a pro camera body and all of the high end lenses.

I may wait for the next generation of DSLR because I already own lenses, but I see the S9X00 as the best bet in a non SLR camera on paper. I will probably use my S7000 as my primary camera until next summer when I may actually need another camera and not just want one. Since your digital is a lower resolution camera with little zoom, you are ready for the next step, I don't think either choice is wrong as long as you get out there with it and start creating images that you enjoy.

Ira
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