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Old Aug 29, 2005, 4:51 AM   #11
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rinniethehun:
You got the point! You should or should not believe what I write. But my results base on 1.5 year of usage of camera. I took thousands of pictures so i have some experience with Fuji S602. And I am not trying to sell you this camera.
BTW, why would we need review pages like this one, if manufacturers give us so accurate and precise info?

Best regards!
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Old Aug 29, 2005, 10:07 PM   #12
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JimC: I agree with your statement, that image quality and usability are also paramount...maybe in my zeal to be brief (ha!) I was so intent on the batteries that I overlooked some additional statements...

I would never buy a AA batt (or CRV3) just for the batts, and then find the image quality is poor and I cannot figure out how to use the camera...image and usability are, to me, givens...

Maybe what I meant to say was: all other factors being equal (and they never are all equal), between two equivalent cameras, if one was proprietary and the other AA/CRV3, I may lean to the AA model because of the availability of alkaline, standard lith AA w/shelf life of 10 years, CRV3, rechargeable AA lith/NiMH, etc...

Interestingly, the new Fujis (S9000, S5200), new Olys (SP Series), and Pentax dSLR (istDS, DL, DS2...does anyone know the actual differences between those 3 models, all released within the last 12 months?)all use the batts I describe...maybe more to come, I think the fall/winter releases will be interesting...:-):G
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Old Aug 29, 2005, 11:32 PM   #13
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I would not buy a camera on the type of battery it uses either, but all other specs being similar, I would go with the AA NiMh set. It's energy density per Dollar of cost cannot be beat. If the camnera is built right (Canon S2), 5 or 6 hundred full resolution pics per charge sounds about right. In a pinch, a set of AA alkaline batteries that can be purchased in Siberia will do the job. The only excuse I can think of for Lithium batteries at this point in time is for use in a pocket cam.

Someone mentioned that NiMh batteries lose charge over time. That is true, but who really cares? They do not go "flat" in one Month, and most chargers will let you bring three or four sets of very cheap, high capacity batteries to full charge in a few hours. It's a bogus argument. Also consider that twelve new NiMh batteries, and a modern charger can be delivered to your home for less than the cost of a single Lithium ion battery alone.

One more thing. Just as in cell phones, camera manufacturers change proprietary battery designs as often as they eat. That keeps the price of a replacement very high. AA batteries of any chemistry are always the same size. They just hold more energy as time passes.

If the camera you MUST have needs expensive Lithium ion batteries, go for it. Then again, if you are not in the market for the latest pocket marvel, be happy with rechargeable AA batteries. Nothing can beat their performance, and no alternative costs so little, and is available in so many places. I have spent hundreds of Dollars on backup sets of proprietary batteries over the years, and at this point in time, a camera that uses AA batteries gets several extra points right off the bat.

Voyager
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Old Aug 31, 2005, 10:57 AM   #14
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They go flat enough that I can't take half a dozen photos of my kid if the camera has been sitting for a month. We've actually had a lot of trouble with that, and now use rechargable alkalines exclusively.

If you use your camera frequently, and like to take lots of photos in a day, then NiMh batteries are definitely the way to go. But if you tend to leave it in the closet, and want to pull it out ready to shoot 20-30 pics from time to time, alkalines rock. They get progressively weaker with each recharge, but the way we use them, they remain usable for a very long time, and the camera is always ready to go.
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Old Aug 31, 2005, 10:26 PM   #15
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Interesting. Rechargeable alkaline batteries might keep a charge longer than NiMh batteries, but they are pretty much only uesful as backup batteries when you are in the mood to take lots of pictures. God forbid you need to use your flash often too, as the alkaline batteries will leave you waiting a long time for the "flash ready" light to turn green after a couple dozen shots in rapid sequence.

I use my camera very often, and my three sets of NiMh batteries never run flat from lack of use. I charge them all every few weeks, and rotate them through the camera. On a vacation, it's tough to beat having a few sets of charged NiMh batteries in your camera case. If you are a casual picture taker, the rechargeable alkiline batteries are probably the way to go, as they are still cheap to buy, have reasonable energy density, and maintain their charge during long periods of sitting idle.


Thanks for helping to make my case for AA batteries. All AA batteries are cheap. They run the gamut from throw away single use batteries, to lithium cells in the same size format, to several types of rechargable AA batteries that juggle energy density, internal resistance, and charge shelf life to provide a good solution for most any application.

As I mentioned before, my three lithium ion battery packs for my Canon S400 cost me nearly $150 at the time I bought them. They were worth the cost, as there is no way to fit standard AA batteries in an S400 case. On the other hand, my S2 has plenty of space for four AA batteries, despite it's small size compared to an SLR, and I wouldn't have it any other way. I need the shooting reserve of 2300 MAh NiMh batteries, and they are available for close to a Dollar each. You need a battery that will sit on the shelf for a long period of time, and be ready when you need them. AA alkaline batteries also cost about a buck each, and are on the shelf everywhere in the world waiting for you to buy them.

When the lithium ion batteries for my Canon S400 reach the end of their life, I will have to hope that I can still find them on the market at all, and will no doubt pay close to $50 each for them the second time around.

I'm all for proprietary batteries and memory cards if there is a compelling reason to use them, but if the reason is just to add post sale revenue to the camera company, I'll pass.

Voyager
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