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Old Aug 26, 2005, 8:33 AM   #1
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With the spouse gone this week, I have had much time alone to think without distraction (:evil...have been looking to upgrade from Oly C-770 UZ, and posting many posts on this and other sites...considering dSLRs, prosumers, etc...had narrowed it down to Coolpix 8800 and Oly C-8080, but changed my mind (for now)...have considered Nikon D70s, Canon, Pentax, KM 7D/5D, and others...numerous posts note a truckload of new releases in Aug-Sep, probably in time for Xmas...

I have compared megapixels, shutter lag, focus lag, weight (still important), physical size, yada, yada, yada...

While I have not narrowed to a specific model, I think I have narrowed to a specific feature that I have decided is important, which will probably not show up on a "search", altho my computer skills are limited...I am asking your help to start me off on my new search, hoping not to spend hours on something I had not earlier considered...

The universe of cameras I wish to consider is those who use AA batteries or standard Li-ion batteries, either one-use or rechargeable...while a proprietary battery is OK, if it can also use standard "hardware store" batteries it can be considered...example, if my c-770 runs out of power, I am helpless...yes, I have an extra battery, but it is annoying...I would like the peace of mind to know that I can throw some one-use lithium or alkaline batts in my case, and I am covered...

I know of a few cameras that fit my specs, but just a few...the 3 Pentax *ist, Olympus C-5500 zoom...can anyone save me time and list others that use reg batts in addition to their own batt???

I finally decided what I think is the definitive feature, and that is "convenience of ongoing power source"...sure, image quality is nice, along with super zoom, image stabilization, AF illuminator, etc...but it all ain't worth a hill of beans if your batteries are dead and your charger is plugged in in your bedroom...

Thanks for any help offered...:?:idea::?
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Old Aug 26, 2005, 5:33 PM   #2
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Try this link...select AA in the 'battery type' drop down, then 'submit'. It will show all(?) of the current cameras that utilize AA batteries. It seems to be pretty much up to date, since it even has the three new Fuji's (at least one of which you might want to consider).

http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/cameraList.php

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Old Aug 26, 2005, 9:57 PM   #3
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Hun: One Million Thanks...never dreamed that there was a site like that...just what the doctor ordered...:-):-)
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Old Aug 26, 2005, 10:33 PM   #4
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Number one on my camera selection criterion was the battery. Next was image quality. Third was features.Forth was price. I ended up with the Fuji S5100 and haven't looked back since.
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Old Aug 27, 2005, 4:50 AM   #5
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Hello!
I had Fuji S602 which used standard AA cells and I had two sets of batterys for it. Now I have Olympus E 300 which uses its own battery and I am never looking back. The main difference is, that my new camera takes round 700 pictures with one battery, but Fuji took round 250 pictures. So my point is, that with so powerful battery this is no longer an issue. I have two batteries one original and one from some other manufacturer which cost 30US and I never run out of power till now.

Best Regards!
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Old Aug 27, 2005, 8:53 AM   #6
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The owners of cameras with proprietary batteries are always touting how great they are. However, if you scan through the threads in this forum, there are hundreds of posts regarding the ridiculously high prices for these batteries, and whether or not it is safe to use generic replacements to save money. Case in point, the BLM-1 battery used by the E300 retails for around $100. For less than $25, I bought a NiMH charger and eight 2400 mAh AA batteries. I get about 400 pictures per charge with 4 batteries, in my S5100. I always carry 8 fully charged AA's as backups. In case of emergency, I can always go to a store and buy alkaline or lithium AA's and carry on. When the proprietary battery craps out in the field, you don't take any more pictures. By the way, generic Li-Ion batteries have been known to have caused catastrophic failures in cameras, resulting in ruined cameras and voided manufacturer warranties.

Fuji claims a battery life of 350 shots per charge with (4) 1600 NiMH mAh AA batteries, so if you use 2500's, you should get well over 500 pics per charge with the S602. Olympus only claims 400 pics per charge with the E300, using the BLM-1 battery...I guess the actual number will vary depending on how you use it.

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Old Aug 27, 2005, 9:02 AM   #7
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These day's, a number of cameras that take AA batteries also take the CR3 (lithium) replacements that look like two AA's stuck together.

Personally, I prefer lithium batteries toAA's.

The main problem with NIMH rechargeables is that they only hold their charge for about one month. Even if you shoot every two weeks, you will feel compelled to reacharge your batteries before a day's outing.

On my Canon 20D, I recharge my lithium batteries only when they are low. Lithium will hold their charge up to one year (compared to one month for NIMH).

Consequently, I recharge my lithiums about once every one ortwo months, or after shooting a couple hundred shots, however with my older camera, I used to have to charge myrechargeable NIMH AAbatteries once every week or two weeks and after about 80to 100 shots.

You can always buy a backup lithium if you need it. Keep in mind, "down the road", any camera you buy will largely be superceded within five years.

So if you think your buying a camera to last you the next 10 or 20 years, I would say that would only be the case if you are not very avid, cash strapped or nostalgic.

Needless to say, in my humble pro opinion, LITHIUM is the way to go. However, if I really liked a camera that took AA's (preferably also CR-3 format so I could use lithium in place of them), I would consider the camera.

To me, image quality and camera responsive are the big two requirements for serious photographers. The type of battery they use is secondary.

Who wants a camera with great batteries that takes lousy pictures, or is so slow you usually miss the action?

-- Terry
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Old Aug 27, 2005, 1:57 PM   #8
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Marsha:

If you select the Camera Reviews Menu Choice from the main page at http://www.steves-digicams.com, you'll see a way to view cameras by resolution.

The tables you will see when you select one of these choices willinclude thebattery and memory type (since these two items are important to many users).

Personally, I would never buy a camera based on either memory type or battery type. Although I do have my preferences (and it can be argued that you already have an investment in one type or the other), image quality and usability of the cameraare far more important.

Batteries are relatively inexpensive (especially generics), andboth battery and memory technology continue to improve. So often, by thetime you're ready to upgrade to another model, you can get a lot more bang for the buck compared to what your investment was in the older battery or memory technology anyway.

Personally, having owned cameras using both types of batteries (proprietary lithium ion versus AA), I prefer the Lithium Ion. It's nice not to need to fumble around with multiple batteries when changing them, worrying about polarity, inserting them into the charger and camera correctly, etc.

Lithium Ions are just plain better (my opinion, that not everyone is going to share). ;-)

But, even if a camera used AA batteries(and I hate looking for those little + and - signs on a camera when trying to change them in a hurry), I'd still buy it anyway (even though I prefer Lithium Ion), if I thought it met my other needs better.



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Old Aug 28, 2005, 4:16 AM   #9
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rinniethehun:
Well, don't believe everything you read. With Fuji I could not get far past 300 pictures with 2500mAh NiMh. And I mainly used EVF and do not review images very often. The real problem is, like Terry already said, discharge of NiMh after some time.

Best Regards!
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Old Aug 29, 2005, 5:05 AM   #10
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steppenwolf,

Does that mean I shouldn't believe anything you write? When I read that a camera manufacturer claims a certain battery life based on the CIPA standard, and that manufacturer is a member of CIPA, as Fuji is, I tend to believe the published data. If you didn't achieve anywhere near the CIPA results, maybe you were doing something wrong. It's kind of like buying a new car according to the published gas mileage expectations...you may do better or worse, depending on how you drive.

http://www.cipa.jp/english/hyoujunka...f/DC-002_e.pdf

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