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Old Sep 15, 2005, 2:16 AM   #11
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i need to back up here a minute...

when itake ZOOMED inpictures (from about 10 feet away), WITH theflash in low lighting situations,my current camera takes very dark pictures set on auto.

if everything else remains constant, should only raising the ISO to 400 make pictures in these situations brighter?

or, is my issue not necessarily ISO, but rather telescopic flash range?

i've been doing so much research online that i think i'm confusing myself. i'm beginning to think the a higher ISO setting only assists pictures in low light when NOT using the flash. is this true?

thanks.




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Old Sep 15, 2005, 7:22 AM   #12
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Using more zoom decreases the amount of light getting through the lens to the sensor. That's why your flash isn't rated as far using zoom.

Using more zoom also decreases the amount of other light entering the image. I rarely use much optical zoom indoors with a compact camera (it impacts the amount of light getting through to the sensor too much).

Read myfirst postin this thread about flash range and ISO speed. Each time you double the ISO speed, you increase flash range by 1.4x.

If your camera is rated at 8.5 feet at the len's full telephoto position, then you'll get around 11.9 feet by doubling the ISO speed.

Increasing ISO speed makes your camera more sensitive to light (it's amplifying the signal from the sensor more as you increase ISO speed).

So, not only will you have more flash range from increasing ISO speed, you'll also get more ambient light in your photo (light from other sources will also contribute more).


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Old Sep 15, 2005, 11:05 AM   #13
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thanks jim. that's what i originally thought, but like i said, i've been reading so much online that i think i started to confuse myself a bit. :?

i try not to use zoom if i don't have to, but there are times when it cannot be avoided. i've played around with my kodak a bit and it does appear that the pictures are somewhat brighter at ISO 400 than the auto setting (ISO 100/200). but, my concern is the limitations with the camera itself. this is as bright as it's going to get and i don't think it's going to be enough for some situations. that's why i've been reading up on the fuji f-10. this camera appears to be very good at low light pictures in the price range i'm looking in. i think this would be a step up from the kodak dx6440 i'm using now which i believe is 3 years old?
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Old Sep 15, 2005, 11:19 AM   #14
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827-

Yes, the Fuji F-10 is a very able digital camera. I have one myself. here is an example photo from the F-10. It was taken inside handheldwithout flash using an ISO setting of 1600.

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Old Sep 15, 2005, 11:38 AM   #15
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wow. i would never get a picture that bright without a flash with my kodak. do you have this at full resolution that i could view? i'd like to see how bad the "noise" truly is at that high of an ISO setting.

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Old Sep 15, 2005, 1:01 PM   #16
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827-

You will find the noise to be very low in Fuji F-10 images. I won't get to posting a full resolution photo until this afternoon due to scheduling conflicts, but I will get it done and let you know.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 23, 2005, 3:09 PM   #17
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so i purchased the fuji f-10. i love the compact size. it seems to take good pictures based on the several test shots i've done around the house. i LOVE the ability to take natural light pictures without a flash. these come out very bright.

but my concern is that every time i turn the flash off to take a picture, the "steady the camera" icon pops up and i end up taking pictures that have a slight blur to them. i've tried it in manual mode, auto mode, using the "natural" lighting setting, etc. and i always get the steady the camera warning. this seems very odd to me.

is there anyway to take non-blurredpictures with the flash off?
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Old Sep 23, 2005, 3:45 PM   #18
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The "rule of thumb" for preventing blur from camera shake is 1/focal length.

So, if you're shooting at focal length (equivalent) of 30mm, you need shutter speeds of 1/30 second or faster. If you're shooting at 100mm, you need 1/100 second or faster.

This is only a rule of thumb, as some users don't hold a camera as steady as others.

If you're getting a camera shake warning,your shutter speeds are too slow for the lighting. Even if you're not getting a camera shake warning, you may need faster shutter speeds for moving subjects.

A well lit interior is very dark to a camera. Unless you have lots of sunshine coming in through windows, chances are, you've got an EV (Exposure Value, which is another way of expressing the amount of light) of around 5 or 6 in typical indoor lighting. That's not bright enough to try using much zoom with a model like the Fuji (even at higher ISO speeds). Otherwise, your shutter speeds are going to be too slow to prevent motion blur from camera shake.

Look at the EXIF in your photos to see what your shutter speeds are. If you don't have a way to see this information, download irfanview from http://www.irfanview.com (it's free). When you open an image, you'll see the camera settings used under Image, Information, EXIF.

See what ISO speed, aperture, and shutter speed you're using. You may need to manually set the camera to ISO 1600 to get your shutter speeds faster (I don't think Auto goes that high). But, that will mean more noise. You may also need to stay more towards the wider end of the lens (and may need a flash if conditions are too dark).

The best bet for existing light photos is a DSLR with a bright lens (larger apertures, represented by smaller f/stop numbers). A prime (non-zoom) lens is popular for existing light photos with DSLR (because you can get brighter lenses with primes than you can with zooms -- with f/2 or brighter being common).

If budget isn't a big issue, you may want to take a look at something like the Konica-Minolta Maxxum 5D. It's got the ability to shoot at up to ISO 3200, and built in anti-shake (which helps to reducemotion blur from camera shake). But, I'd still go with something brighter thanit's kit lens for existing light photos.

The lens on a compact model like the F10 is not very bright using zoom (so the more you use, the slower your shutter speeds will be from light loss).

But, since motion blur from camera shake is amplifed as more zoom is used, you're adding to the problem two ways when you use it (longer focal lengths and less light).

Again, take a look at the EXIF information in your images. That will give you an idea of what your shutter speeds are in the conditions you're having problems in. Then, either adjust the camera (higher ISO speeds) and/or adjust your shooting style (don't use as much zoom if that's causing a problem, or use a flash if the lighting won't allow you to hand hold the camera in some conditions).

You can learn a lot about camera behavior by examining the settings that were used in the EXIF.


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Old Sep 23, 2005, 3:55 PM   #19
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i've read through the manual and don't remember it saying anything about being able to adjust theaperature& shutter speed?? i can change the ISO however. the kodak i had let me adjust all three manually. there must be some way to do it on the f-10?

thanks.
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Old Sep 23, 2005, 4:01 PM   #20
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The camera will already be using the largest available aperture in low light (f/2.8 at it's full wide angle lens position, losing light as more zoom is used down to only f/5.0 at full zoom).

It will also use the appropriate shutter speed in low light (it's got to keep it open long enough to expose the image).

So, even if you had manual exposure ability, it's not going to help.

I'm suggesting looking at the EXIF to see what the camera needed to use for shutter speeds. Then, you'd know more about why your photos are blurry, and what you may need to change (probably not use as much zoom)..

For example, if you're getting 1/30 second shutter speeds, and trying to use a 100mm zoom setting, you can expect blurry photos (shutter speeds need to be much faster, unless you're able to hold a camera very steady, and have a very smooth "trigger finger". Of course, that only works for stationary subjects.


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