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Old Sep 26, 2005, 12:52 PM   #1
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Between the Olympus D-595 and the Olympus C-5500, which would be better to take pictures of kids indoors and kids playing sports outdoors? Thanks for any suggestions!!!
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Old Sep 26, 2005, 4:24 PM   #2
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Between these two models, I'd probably go with the C-5500 for a couple of reasons:

One is because it uses 4 versus 2 AA Batteries. I'd suggest going with High CapacityNiMH Rechargeable Batteries.

Although itlooks like they test close to the same recharge time in the review here on average (see each model's review conclusion section), keep in mind that flash recycle time is very much dependent on your distance to subject.

A camera will take longer to recharge if your subject is further away (and both of these models have a maximum flash range of 12.5 feet at the lens' widest position, with shorter ranges down to around 8.5 feet as you use more zoom). You'll get faster recharge times for closer subjects (because the flash burst is shorter as not to overexpose your closer subject).

It's been my experience that a model with 4 versus 2 AA batteries will tend to recharge faster (especially for full power flashes), if they are similar otherwise.

You'll need to use a flash indoors with a compact Digital Camera (otherwise your shutter speeds are going to be too slow, so you'll get motion blur from any movement without flash), and the C-5500 shouldrecharge the flash faster because it's got more power feeding it.

You'll need to wait between photos indoors for this recharge to finish each time you shoot (unless you are using a tripod and taking photos of a stationary subject)

The other reason is because it's got a lens with a longer reach (which could be handy for kids playing outdoors, when you may want to zoom in on them to bring them in closer). The C-5500 lens has a 35mm equivalent focal range of 38-190mm, as compared to 38-114mm for the D-595.

I'd suggest ignoring "Digital Zoom", since this is like cropping a photo (removing the outside edges, leaving the desired portion in the middle, then enlarging the image again back to it's original size).

This degrades image quality, so I make sure to keep Digital Zoom disabled on cameras I use with this feature (since you can crop a photo more precisely later using an image editor, with more control over the process). Optical Zoom is the way to go, if you want to bring your subjects in closer without degradation like you get using Digital Zoom.

There are more differences between these models. But, just because one model has a feature that another doesn't, is not a reason to chooseit, unless you're actually going to use that feature. ;-)

Make sure to read the reviews here, paying close attention to the review Conclusion Sections. That's where you'll see things like Startup Time, Autofocus Speed and Reliability, Cycle time between photos (with and without flash), flash range, viewfinder usability, image quality, etc. discussed.

Also make sure to try out any camera you consider in a store. When you get into smaller cameras like this, ergonomics can be important (some users may consider these smaller cameras to be "ergonomically challenging").

For example, Steve comments on no place to put your fingers with the flash popped up on the C-5500 (see the review conclusion section). But, I personallydon't like models designed like the D-565 (with the lens on one side of the camera), because my fingers tend to get in the way of the lens, and I prefer using 2 hands with a model like this (especially since there's not much ofa "grip" to it).

You want to make sure you're comfortable with the ergonomics, viewfinder, control layout, menus, speed of operation, etc., for a camera you buy (and you need to try them out "in person" to see if a camera is a good fit for you). Each user is going to have different preferences in ergonomics.
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Old Sep 26, 2005, 4:41 PM   #3
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Thank you so much for all that information. I'm new to the digital world, so it really is confusing to me. Do you know if either one of these cameras have the date printed on the pictures? Thanks!!!
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Old Sep 26, 2005, 5:00 PM   #4
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Well, any of these models have so many features anymore, that it's going to be confusing to almost anyone. Between these two, the C-5500 has more features that advanced photographers would appreciate. But, again, look at the features that you may want to use (versus just comparing spec sheets).

As for the date/time stamp,it doesn't look like these models have this feature.

I personally think that date stamps can ruin photos (my opinion anyway, since the date stamp can be pretty unsightly, especially if the color of the stamp happens to clash with the image you take). Everytime I see someone post a photo here with one, I cringe (but, that's probably just me). ;-)

But, you can get software to print a date/time stamp on a photo, if you really have a need for it.

The settings a camera used to take a photo are included inthe EXIF (a header that is part of your images).This header includes the date and time an image was taken. You can get free software that can read the date the photo was taken, and stamp your images with the date if desired.

One example of a free utility isExifer for Windows (it's watermark feature can read the date information, and place it on the photos in batch mode. There are more programsthat can do this, too.

Using this technique (instead of a camera's date stamp feature), insures that you always have originals without the date stamp (since it can be unsightly). Simplywork with copies of your originals so you'll have versions with and without a date stamp.

Some printing software can also place the date on a photo when printing (reading it from the header in the image file). Even the free software Canon includes with some of it's newer Pixma printers has this feature (and some third party printing software like QImage Pro can also do this, with nodate stampfeature in the camera needed).

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Old Sep 27, 2005, 8:55 AM   #5
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Thanks, again. Do you have any suggestions for a different camera that might be best to suit my needs for around the same price? I've been into Best Buy several times, and everytime I have talked to someone different, and they have always suggested the Kodak C340. I don't know how the Kodak brand holds up to the other brands. My brother suggested the Olympus brand, that's why I've been leaning more towards those two cameras. Thanks again for your help.
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Old Sep 27, 2005, 9:35 AM   #6
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There are hundreds of current camera models, and each one will have pros and cons.

We have a Best Cameras List that you may want to look through (models Steve deems to be a goodvalue).

You'll see multiple categories. In your price range (based on the models you've mentioned, the Consumer Categories would be a good place to start)..

Then, read the reviews (most importantarethe review conclusion sections, that you'll find on the page right before the sample images in each review).

That's where you'll see how a camera compares to another (startup time, AF times, cycle times between photos, image quality, etc.).

There is no one perfect choice in a camera, just like there is no one perfect choice in another product. For example, if you were shopping for a new car, you'd find many of them that would serve your needs. So, given that a camera meets your needs (speed of operation, optical zoom capability, image quality, etc.)much ofit boils down to what features you really need (and it sounds like you are looking for something relatively simple), and user preferences.

Again, try out the models you are considering in a store (versus just looking at them). You'll want to make sure you're comfortable with a camera (speed of operation, viewfinder, controls, LCD, ergonomics, etc.).

We have not reviewed the C-540. But, it's probably going to be very similar to the C-560 (which we have reviewed). From reading through the review conclusion section, it looks like it might be pretty slow writing to the memory card (which can iimpact your ability to get lots of shots in rapid succession). But, this would only bea hinderance if you're taking more than 5 photos quickly in a row (then, the camera's operation may slow down untilyou wait for around 30 seconds or so for the buffer to clear). But, otherwise, performance looks good.

Kodaks are liked by some users, because they are relatively simple to use. But, most cameras are if you leave them in Auto mode (and virtually all modern digital cameras have an Auto mode, even if they have more advanced features).

Compare thesample images here for cameras you consider, too. Then, you can see how the images compare for the same types of subjects (some of the samples use the same subjects for each review). You can see the full size images by clicking on any of the thumbnails in the sample image sections (last page in each camera's review).



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Old Sep 29, 2005, 2:09 PM   #7
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Thanks for your help. I went and looked at the cameras and I seen what the big deal was about the Olympus C-5500 flash. It sits right ontop of the left hand corner, you have to push a button to make the flash come up, and it looks like the flash could just break up. Have you heard of it breaking off??? Thanks.
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Old Sep 29, 2005, 2:57 PM   #8
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No, I haven't heard of the flash breaking off (but, I haven't looked for that problem, either). If it was a common problem, I think I would have noticed it.

This is a new model. You sometimes need to wait well into a product's lifecycle before any weak points in a products design become more well known (is a mode dial likely to have contact problems later, is a display likely to develop bad pixels, is a lens likely to have a problem locking up, etc.

Any camera can have a failure (more often than not, something like a card door breaking off, etc., is when an owner doesn't handle it with care).

For example, I'm very careful with what I consider to be delicate parts of cameras I've owned (battery door, memory card compartments, mode dials, and of course the lenses), and I've yet to break any Digital Camera.

I did recently break an old Nikon 35mm camera. I just wasn't careful enoughopening the back cover changing film (didn't have the spring loaded switch pressed far enough when I pulled the cover open versus waiting for it to "spring" open).

Ibroke off a little plastic piece that's needed to keep the cover shut. But, I can't complain too much. It was about 15 years old.


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