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Old Sep 28, 2005, 2:00 AM   #1
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I am looking to buy a digital camera for use at work. I have a couple of engineers who run a repair service and need to take pictures of their work. Sometimes this requires good close ups. They are not experienced photographers.

We have an Olympus 5050 but now need a second camera as the 5050is used elsewhere in the company. The bright 1.8 lens was a bonus on the 5050 as I dont want to use a tripod. I've been considering the Canon S2. Can anyone share their experiences with this camera for handheld macro work or if there are better or equivilantcameras I should consider. Price is not a major issue but I dont want to go down the SLR with macro lenses/bellows/etc route. Just something relatively simple like the 5050 but current.

thanks for any advice or experiences
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Old Sep 28, 2005, 9:06 AM   #2
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Since people know and like the 5050, have you considered getting the 5060, which is an update of the 5050? It should be about as similar in operation as you're going to get, but a bit more current. FWIW.


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Old Sep 28, 2005, 9:27 AM   #3
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Dinmore wrote:
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Price is not a major issue but I dont want to go down the SLR with macro lenses/bellows/etc route. Just something relatively simple like the 5050 but current.
7070 + ring flash unit.

https://emporium.olympus.com/innards...sku=260112-410
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Old Sep 28, 2005, 2:10 PM   #4
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The 5050 doesnt really handle that well. Im sure the newer models handle better though and to be honest I hadn't considered them. The results with the 5050 are good (as I said the 1.8 lens is great for hand held shouts) but it can be a pain to use at times.

The IS is what got me thinking about the canon as there doesn't seam to be any 1.8 lenses around in this type of camera. (correct me if im wrong)


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Old Sep 28, 2005, 2:47 PM   #5
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I think the Canon A620 might be a good choice for you, you can get as close as 1cm, its just come out but already people are posting pics, check out the 2nd image in the following thread of a close up of a flower. Further in the thread the same guys shows the flower at 100% crop, very impressive

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/re...ssage=15191517

in fact here's th 100% crop
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/re...ssage=15206703


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Old Sep 28, 2005, 3:02 PM   #6
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Dinmore wrote:
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The 5050 doesnt really handle that well. Im sure the newer models handle better though and to be honest I hadn't considered them. The results with the 5050 are good (as I said the 1.8 lens is great for hand held shouts) but it can be a pain to use at times.

The IS is what got me thinking about the canon as there doesn't seam to be any 1.8 lenses around in this type of camera. (correct me if im wrong)


You're right that a max f/1.8 is unusual -- even the 5060 doesn't do that. The most common max aperture is 2.8. One camera that you might want to take a look at is the Fuji Finepix S5200. It has a max aperture of 3.2, but has up to 1600 ISO speed, which should more than compensate for the smaller aperture as far as light-gathering goes. I haven't seen any reviews of the 5200 yet, but it looks like it might be a good bet. The press releases talk about "anti-blur" technology, so this may be the first Fuji of this type camera with IS. Then again, this may be a marketer's shinola for dancing around the fact that they still don't have IS...


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Old Sep 28, 2005, 10:45 PM   #7
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Dinmore wrote:
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I have a couple of engineers who run a repair service and need to take pictures of their work.
One more thing, for technical application you don't want a shallow DOF that a 1.8 lens will give you (you'll usually have to stop down to get the DOF) - you're wanting to get the details, and notthe aesthetics of a blurred back/foreground. I'd vote again for a ring flash unit, whatever camera you get (I'm assuming indoor lighting levels). No worries about slow shutter speed, 'anti-shake', IS, tripod, etc - in fact, you'll notice that a large portion of macro+ringflash is made for the technical/medical field.
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Old Sep 28, 2005, 11:48 PM   #8
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tclune wrote:
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The press releases talk about "anti-blur" technology, so this may be the first Fuji of this type camera with IS. Then again, this may be a marketer's shinola for dancing around the fact that they still don't have IS...
Anti-Blur = Auto ISO

That's about it. :-) There is no mechanical (optical or CCD) stabilzaton mechanism in these cameras.

Look at the S9000/9500 press release and you'll see how it was described there:

"Mode dial with multiple settings, including Anti-Blur that automatically adjust the camera's ISO settings to combat camera shake and blur and Natural Light for more natural looking photos, particularly in low light"

http://www.steves-digicams.com/pr/fu..._s9000_pr.html

They weren't quite as obvious about it in the S5200 press release:

"Equipped with 5.1 MegaPixels, a 10x optical zoom and proprietary technology that suppresses camera shake and blur caused by subject movement, the FinePix S5200 offers an excellent entry point into the world of feature-rich cameras without losing its operational simplicity."

http://www.steves-digicams.com/pr/fu..._s5200_pr.html

Hmmm, how about a Fuji sensor that can go to higher ISO speeds. Their sensor is proprietary, right? How about when and how much they increase ISO speed? Wouldn't that be proprietary (like any other manufacturer's Auto ISO algorithms)?

Leave it to the marketing departments to call it Anti-Blur (which IMO is a bit misleading since camera buyers may assume that it means the same thing as Anti-Shake (Konica-Minolta's CCD Stabilization technique).

My gut feeling is that the marketing people probably deliberately tried to make it sound like Konica-Minolta's Anti-Shake by calling it Anti-Blur (speculation on my part).

Sure, higher ISO speeds reduce blur because you'll get faster shutter speeds. So, calling it Anti-Blur is perfectly valid, right? You'll see arguments on both sides of that one. You thought it meant something different (but, you were smart enough to realize that it could be marketing). :-)

All of the manufacturers do similar stuff in the marketing material though. There was a thread a while back poking fun at the manufacturers (just about all of them) based on some of the stuff they put in their marketing material.

I got a kick out of it (but I think that some forum members didn't appreciate my humour since they don't think that *their* favorite manufacturer would ever try to mislead anyone, and we were poking fun at more than one manufacturer).

My all tiime favorite so far is from Pentax, "The Official Camera of the Internet" (they trademarked it for marketing purposes).

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