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Old Dec 7, 2005, 8:53 PM   #1
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I went on a cruise this past week and used my Kodak DX7630.

I took around 800 pictures, after viewing them on my computer I ended up with 625 pictures.
The others were either bad, fuzy, etc.

What I found out was, outside shots were very good but most inside shots were bad/fuzy to different extents.

I tried taking these inside shots in many different modes and with flash and no flash.

Can anyone help me or tell me of another camera that I might check into.
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Old Dec 7, 2005, 11:24 PM   #2
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Your links are screwed up. All three link to a thread on another board and none show any of your shots.

We often get posts from first time digital users who think since the indoor light looks good to their eyes it is OK for the camera. Your camera shows the shutter speed in the LCD when you half depress the shutter release. Look at the speed. If it is less than the reciprocal of the 35mm equivalent focal length you are likely to get blurred shots – especially if you are holding the camera out in front of you and shooting with the LCD. That would be 1/40 second at wide angle and 1/120 second for full telephoto. You can use a little less if you aren't blowing it up much and using the optical viewfinder. But most cameras won't generate that kind of shutter speed indoors with normal room lighting. If you are reading less than 1/20 second at wide and less than 1/60 at telephoto you will not be happy without turning on the flash.

I have no idea why the flash shots would be bad unless you aren't giving the camera time to focus or shooting outside the flash range. Some sample shots without the EXIF stripped would be helpful.

You might consider a Fuji F10 that lets you crank up the ISO for indoor shots. Or a Panasonic FX9 with stabilization. The F10 approach is better for moving subjects and the stabilization is better for still subjects.

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Old Dec 8, 2005, 6:11 PM   #3
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http://http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/budspix/album?.dir=/d124]http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/budspix/album?.dir=/d124]http://http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/budspix/album?.dir=/d124[/url]



will this work?

if not I will do something different.

just different type shots.

when taking inside shots i would take 2 to 4 with different type settings.

best I can tell is inside shots were f-2.8 & 1/60
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Old Dec 8, 2005, 6:21 PM   #4
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this is one shot in the atrim
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Old Dec 8, 2005, 6:23 PM   #5
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This is in the atrim at the bar.
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Old Dec 8, 2005, 6:31 PM   #6
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they are both pretty good shots for a hand held point and shoot camera

for brightly lit indoor scenes try iso 400, 1/125s, f4


photography is an art requiring many years of practice and experience


after shooting for 40+ years i find i 'keep' about 10-20% of my shots


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