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Old Dec 20, 2005, 11:03 PM   #11
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I don't understand the PC Mag review...just seems like unwarranted Fuji bashing. The PC Mag members apparently disagree with the Editor, based on the member's rating and the discussion board. I don't know where he came up with the performance times either...boot time of 2.7 seconds and "recycle" time (whatever that means) of 4.0 seconds. According to dpreview, the startup time for the F10 is 1.0 seconds, the shot-to-shot time is 1.7 seconds, and the lag time is less than 0.05 seconds. Why didn't Mr. PC Mag mention the lag time of the F10...because it's more than twice as fast as his beloved Canon?

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/fuji...zoom/page4.asp

If you don't like the auto ISO, you can shut it off...I guess the Editor didn't take the time to figure that one out.

Take a look at the side-by-side comparison between the F10 and the SD 500:

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/fuji...zoom/page6.asp

They're pretty close when you compare them at ISO 80 for the F10 and ISO 50 for the SD 500, but when you get up to ISO 400, look out. The Canon can't go any higher, but it's just as well, because you probably wouldn't be able to distinguish any detail at all at a higher ISO.

the Hun

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Old Dec 21, 2005, 12:40 AM   #12
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The only bashing I have to do here is against PC Mag. This is not the first time I've bashed them, as they have very often contrasted my experience with product. First of all, yes the camera does like to choose high ISO in low to mid light situations, but most people who care about the noise will take the three clicks to adjust it manually. It makes sense that in complete auto mode it ups the ISO so camera illerate people won't constantly get blurry images.

Also, the recycle time and boot up time are completely off. Even on my own tests where I count verbaly, and quicker than I should, the camera definitely takes less than 1.5seconds to boot after holding the button for .5seconds, which it does tom prevent accidental turn on. If he is pentalizing the camera for that feature, then it is appearant he does nothing with his camera but benchmark. The recycle time, even with a preview and slow syncro flash on is less than 3 seconds, and without the flash, it takes less than a second before it starts focusing for the next picture.

Also, the picture quality benchmarks with the computerized DigitalCameraInfo.com, which specializes in unbiased computerized ratings, in addition to their comments to their tests. They have some more biased tests too, but I use them primarily for the computerized standards. The Canon (SD500) has more accurate color, but the Fuji has slightly more real resolution and the Fuji's noise at 1600 is about equal to the canons at 200 according to the graph. The noise may be of different types, however.

Now the lux test was somehwhat unfair to the Fuji at this site, as they left the camera in manual mode, and did not switch to night mode. No matter what, in manual mode, the camera will not go over 1/4s shutter. Yes, the camera should, but it doesn't. The work around is using night mode, which would have easily exposed the 5 lux test, as ISO1600 3 seconds would have definitely taken care of business, and long exposure mode would allow up to 15 seconds.

Both cameras are great, but each have their benefits, and you have to take some reviews with a grain of salt due to bias or improper use of the camera. If you like the Canon's picture quality better and can live with it's noise at high ISO, or use the flash to compensate in medium light, then it is the camera for you. Neither camera has true manual capabilities, but both have different features that make them appealing.

I'd also read the dpreivew reviews of the cameras. They actually had a section regaurding to the canon's tendancy to overexpose some shots with blown out highlights, though not often. The F10 page also has mention of it being a rare occurance, and the -.3 setting is the remedy. However, dpreview found the F10 to have a more error in auto white balance tungtsten situations, but was slightly more accurate in outdoors. The F10 seemed to have less barrel distroriton, but might have slightly more color fringing.

As you can see, each camera has trade offs, and you must weight them for yourself.

For printers, any of the printers with Pict-Bridge capability or card readers can communicate with a modern digital camera to do prints independent of a computer. However, I like to use a computer anyways for slight touch ups of certain pictures. And for most pictures, I order online as the quality is better and more archival, and ends up being about the same cost.

Also, Hun pointed to a great comparison on the dpreview review page. Here is a quote from their synopsis

"Overall there's not a massive amount of difference between the Fuji F10 and Canon SD500 at their lowest ISO settings - certainly not enough to really show in a standard print. Looking more closely a few things become apparent. Firstly the F10 has a more subdued - and more natural - color palette (with none of the aggressive reds produced by the Canon), and has far better edge-to-edge consistency. It's also interesting to note how, despite the million or so extra pixels, the SD500 isn't actually capturing any more detail (and towards the edge the F10 is clearly superior - look at the battery and watch crops). The Canon image looks slightly 'crisper' thanks to Canon's more aggressive in-camera sharpening, but there's no denying the F10 has the edge here in terms of absolute image quality, producing results that are amongst the best we've seen from any compact camera, never mind a 6 megapixel 'point-and-shoot' model."
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Old Dec 21, 2005, 4:29 AM   #13
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Carskick Thanks for deep answers.

In case i get Fuji F10 i have a question:

What manual control should i set first when i get camera.

So far i know:

- Adjust exposure compensation to -1/3 Ev

- Switch to manual ISO and set it to 50 on Day and use Auto-iso on night

Since is my first digital camera it will take a bit to get used

to manual function so it would be good to know

what manual function you recomend at first carskick.
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Old Dec 21, 2005, 5:01 AM   #14
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I checked with Fuji

about the charger cradle CP-FXA10:

http://www.dealtime.com/xPC-Fuji_CP_FXA10_UNIV

Fuji said is NOT compatible with Fuji F10

is that correct?

It also seem the cradle use Nh-10 battery

and i know the Fuji F10 use Np-120 battery

so then is not compatible?


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Old Dec 21, 2005, 5:36 AM   #15
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i Got another question

I was thinking of getting a 3M screen protector

3M is kind to send me some free samples of a screen protector

that would suit for mobile phones.

Would it be a good idea to stick this on a camera

providing that it can be taken off without damaging the screen.

The reason to put on a screen protector is to avoid scratches

What is you though about using Screen protectors for digital camera.

Should i do it or should i not

Since 3m send it to me for Free it will only be timeconsuming

cutting the protector to fit the camera thats all.


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Old Dec 21, 2005, 12:17 PM   #16
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Okay, fuji's site says to use the BC-65 Rapid Travel Battery Charger to charge the battery seperately from the camera. The one you list may or may not work. Personally, I would not take the chance, I would just get a BC-65 if you need one.

I use the camera on either the manual mode, which is signified by a picture of a camera with an M after it. This setting is very versitile because you have access to almost all features, but can put them on auto as well, so you can pick and choose which settings you want to adjsut at each time. I always adjust the ISO manually. Outdoors, I use ISO80-200 depending on suject and conditions, indoors ISO200-800, and ISO1600 in the most difficult situation, like hand holding when shooting chirstmas lights. If you adjust the ISO manually, a picture won't be destroyed because the camera chose too high or low of an ISO. I put it on auto only when I hand someone else the camera, or I set it ahead of time. I rarely adjust white balance, only in bad incandecent light, where the camera produces slightly too yellow pictures. I usually leave photometry on multi, and focus on center. Spot photmetry is used when I need optimal exposure control.

However, if the cameras on a tripod and you need long exposure, you'll have to switch it to SP and choose night. This will allow the camera to automatically choose up to 3 seconds, or you can go in the setup menu, choose long exposure, and manually choose between several stops from 3-15 seconds. Night mode tends to underexpose a tad, and does this to prevent blur I guess, so you may need to plan on that in this mode.

For screen protection, I don't think it would hurt the camera to try it, but glare will be increaced in the outdoors. I use screen protectors on my Pocket PC, and it protects at the expense of usability, for example smoothness of the styless and readability.

BTW, here is a crop I did from steve's pictures using three cameras.
The softness of the Fuji is comparable to that of the SLR's.

(Sorry the text is grey, it went to black, and it can't go back to white. Weird.)

From Top to bottom
Canon Rebel XT SLR
Fuji F10
Canon SD550

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Old Dec 21, 2005, 6:36 PM   #17
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I finaly got to the shop and got Fuji F10 They only had one left so i had to take the one they had in the exhibition window ,anyway i have 15 days return just in case.

PROBLEM I HAVE:

After installing the Software I plugged the camera correctly into my Xp laptop. The first thing that happens is BLUE SCREEN (good start , this is the first blue screen i EVER had on this completly new laptop).

I reboot and try again , BLUE SCREEN again I reboot and turn off some program in tray to free up memory (but i have plenty 1024 MB ) this time Camera conect Nice and i could transfer photos to PC.

Then i turn off the Camera and take out the Usb cable from the camera (Since i had to shoot more photos)

Guess what happen, BLUE SCREEN (Nice Fuji , Nice

4 Blue screen in under 10 minuts, not bad

And is not my laptop it must be the way i conect or disconect it.

This is how i installed and conected it:

===============================

before conecting camera i installed the provided software It took a while so pacience needed.

After is installed it ask me to reboot.

After reboot i conect the triple-adaptor (the you can plug 3 cables into) into the camera, and i conect the AC to start charge the battery.

I go into menu and change the usb settings as the manual say i have to.

I then conect the usb cable from Computer to the Triple-adaptor.

Now i am supose to swich on the camera, which i did

when computer detected camera i got BLUE SCREEN

i solved this by closing more programs in the tray (even i have plenty memory)

I reboot (because of blue screen)

Again i turn on camera, and this time i got a Box saying camera is detected

and AGAIN it ask me to reboot which i did.

Then after reboot I get the Finepix icon in tray so i click on it

and get the screen to transfer photo , which i do.

Transfer is done easy and fast .

After it ask me if i want to unplug the camera i say NO since i though about something more i was going to transfer.

When i am done , i unplug the USB cable that is atached to the camera

and i get BLUE SCREEN.

Is it normal to get a blue screen everytime you unplug the camera?

either i am doing something wrong disconecting it or there some incompatibilites between my new laptop and this camera, which is the first thing ever i found give me a blue screen on my brand new laptop.

I am guessing that i possible have to shut down some usb drivers in tray

before i plug it out, if i can figure out what i have to do to proper uncouple the camera from the pc maybe i wont get the blue screen, but I cant understand Why Fuji do thing so complicated for people.

I hope i dont have to change the camera for another brand just because it crashes my new laptop

Here is my first photos ever with the camera taken in Auto and most in Iso 800, reduced to 1024X768 for easy viewing.







I Then try to zoom in on the christmas light but battery was out (was only little charged from the shop) but i found out i could Zoom in on photos already taken Problem is i only got 800X600 resolution , do i loose resolution by zooming in on photos that already has been taken?

se photo below this photo is the same as above but i zoomed in adjusting it

in the menu :


The last i Got very blurry because bus was moving?



Please anyone help me fix the Blue screen problem i get when disconecting the camera.



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Old Dec 21, 2005, 8:31 PM   #18
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John,

Blue screens are not a normal occurence. You said you never had a blue screen before on your new laptop. Let me ask you this...did you ever plug a device with a USB cable into your new laptop before this camera? If you have another device with a USB cable, plug it in and see if you get a blue screen. If you do, then it's your computer and not the camera. If you don't, then uninstall your Fuji software. Reboot your computer and plug the camera directly into the USB port and see if your computer recognizes it. No blue screen? Reinstall the Fuji software and try again. I bet it will work.

Let us know if that helps.

Good luck.

the Hun

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Old Dec 21, 2005, 9:26 PM   #19
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rinniethehun wrote:
Quote:
John,

Blue screens are not a normal occurence. You said you never had a blue screen before on your new laptop. Let me ask you this...did you ever plug a device with a USB cable into your new laptop before this camera? If you have another device with a USB cable, plug it in and see if you get a blue screen. If you do, then it's your computer and not the camera. If you don't, then uninstall your Fuji software. Reboot your computer and plug the camera directly into the USB port and see if your computer recognizes it. No blue screen? Reinstall the Fuji software and try again. I bet it will work.

Let us know if that helps.

Good luck.

the Hun
Yes i have plugged Usb cable before into laptop, for example i daily use a Net-mindisc Sony player and even Sony which is known having one of the buggiest software dont give me blue screen.

The problem seem to be releated to when pc identify and uncouple camera Something happen and it gives a blue screen.

This something could be that The fuji software Realy use lot of memory (even with my 1024MB) In tray i have running : Zonealarm, Nod32 antivirus, konfabulator,avedesk and windowsblinds. i though it was related to a conflict with the antivirus but i switched Nod32 off and found out it had nothing to do with that.

I managed to disconect the camera from pc 1 of 10 times , 1 time it was sucessfull the other 9 it gave me blue screen.

Tomorow i will talk with Fuji Suport if they are unable to solve it i have 2 solution:

1. Live with it, get a blue screen each time i have disconect camera from pc

2. Or better change the camera for another camera brand (Canon?)

I have Never ever seen such a sensible Software as the one Fuji provided

and i though the Sony was the worst.

It could just be that my Hp laptop dont like the Fuji software at all

but Fuji should be able to provide a solution (i hope they do)

i have installed and uninstalled the software hundred of times with no difference.

Problem is my laptop dont have Xd card reader either and i trusted i could use the Fuji transfer cable provided.

I didnt expect to find my first problem in the software.

Could it be that not having Spoolsv.exe service active cause this problem

i mean with it off you cant use Scanner and Printer, but i am unaware if this can afect transfer of photos to the computer, i doubt is that since i managed avoid blue screen

1 of 9 times.

I will try plug in the other usb cables i have , but i doubt is that .

I already tried installing/uninstalling a lot of time

and EACH time i install the software , as soon i plug usb cable in

and Switch on camera , i get a BLUE SCREEN when pc is trying to identify the Fuji-usb

then after resetting upon next atemt , and after switching off all tray-icons

i manage to avoid blue screen conecting.

but now i keep getting blue screen each time i unplug the camera

is quite frustating.


















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Old Dec 21, 2005, 9:31 PM   #20
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I tried with other usb device i dont get blue screen with that Only with the Fuji sofware
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