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Old Jan 14, 2006, 7:34 AM   #11
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They are. But what I hear from educated sources is that the extruding lens systems (which most cameras have) could be too fragile and non-durable. Hence, the Sony T9 could be the best bet (internal lens system) ?

Comments on this issue (durability/fragility) are appreciated...and Im still open for good suggestions. Also, does anyone know about a good weatherproof case that could be fastened to the upper arm while running ?

Tor




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Old Jan 14, 2006, 8:20 AM   #12
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Yep, isn't it lovely how some makers (Canon,Fuji) use different model names on different sides of "pond".


For more weather proof cameras Olympus Stylus "peace of soap" design cameras should be rainproof, but they are thicker (near 3cm thick) than these ultracompacts. (and again use proprietary memory)

Torr wrote:
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If it rains like h***, the camera sleeps at home
And no point in taking rain photos when everyone have seen more than enough rain?



Here's some comparison, especially size differences are easy to look when those datas are next to each other.
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/comp...dsct7&show=all
You can add more cameras to comparison to going to "Buying guide" > "Side-by-Side" and adding cameras to list.

Generally all of these are very similar, not much differences in features, similar zomm ranges, everyone has enough megapixels... WB as only manual setting. (except z750)

On the other hand internal zoom mechanism could be handy if your going to visit very dusty conditions, friend was year in UNMEE troops and zoom of Canon Ixus started to keep some noise because there was dust in between parts... but in ordinary conditions that shouldn't be problem.


As side note Casio Z750 uses MPEG4 video compression which can fit considerably more good quality video to same space so if you're intending to use same camera longer time and for vacations and such that might be nice feature. (but that camera requires little tweaking settings because otherwise shots are "Disneyland"-overprocessed)
Also Kodak V550 uses same video compression but apparently with rather tight settings.
http://www.steves-digicams.com/2005_.../v550_pg5.html


Here's other review site with reviews nicely on one page.
http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/cameraList.php


Torr wrote:
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Thanks ET, nice makeover by the way
That's from my other hobby, I was here as guide and we had little "more official" suits... Nice to have suit with "own" name in it. (so what could be my first name...)
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Old Jan 14, 2006, 12:15 PM   #13
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You don't seem to have a need for an optical viewfinder or any manual controls with the S500 and T9 on your list.

The T9 is an exceptional little camera. It has true optical stabilization combined with better than average high ISO performance. The combination of optical stabilization and good high ISO performance would give a lot of versatility in limited light. The optics are good and it seems to be an all-round capable little camera. It has a large high quality LCD. If you compare apples to apples and compare with only good quality high speed SD cards, Memory Stick Pro isn't more expensive enough to alter your selection IMO. I have found that memory cards are usually married to my cameras, even if I have other devices that take the same cards. And when the camera finally needs replacing the card is just as obsolete as the camera.

The S500 uses a Casio lens with transparent ceramics technology. The S series hasn't gotten the highest praise for image quality, and I suspect the new S600 will have the same lens. But the people rating the cameras view the images 100% where you have to scroll around the screen to see the whole image. For small prints and normal viewing I don't think you will see any difference in quality. It has good MPEG4 movies if that is of interest. The LCD is very low resolution.

I have a Z750 and like it. But if a point and shoot with no viewfinder would work just as well for you it might be overkill. It is larger than the T9 or S500 but smaller than the V530/550. It has full manual everything and a great control setup. The lens is excellent and the resolution high. I prefer having an optical viewfinder even if it is small. The Z750 viewfinder works fine for me but I don't think it would be very good for an eyeglass user.

Friends got a small digital recently and asked my advice. After a lot of discussion and looking I recommended they get a Kodak V550. The EasyShare software is ideal for them. Just put the camera on the dock, right click on the icon in the tray and have it acquire the photos. It makes a new album titled with the download date (which you can change) and puts the images from the camera into the album. It isn't the method I would use, but it is perfect for someone who can't remember how to make and name a folder, then put the photos in it. It has a much nicer LCD than my Z750 and a better optical finder. It is pure point and shoot, but you can do a lot with spot metering, EV shift etc. It is larger than any of the other cameras listed, but it is still quite compact.

If you don't need an optical viewfinder the T9 is the stand out choice IMO.



Edit: I forgot to mention the SD450. It is an excellent little camera with an optical viewfinder. I personally can't do without an optical viewfinder. You can acquire and follow moving targets better when zoomed with the optical finder and it is better in bright sunlight. The SD450 is more compact than the V550 or V530 and at least as competent. Unless you have problems making folders and putting images in them I think it is a better choice than the V550. The movies take a lot more space but are a tad better quality. It doesn't have internal memory for a permanent album like the V550 and the LCD quality isn't as good. Many people don't make permanent albums to carry in their camera and I don't find LCD quality quite as important with an optical finder.

And if you might want to expand your photography horizons to manual controls the Z750 is hard to beat now that they seem to have the lens errors solved. If you elect to go with the Z750 get one from a volume dealer so you can be sure to get one of recent manufacture. Better yet get the gunmetal version. They look great and are all new.



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Old Jan 14, 2006, 1:29 PM   #14
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Thanks Slipe, thats was really good and deep hinsights ! They bring, however, a few questions to mind:



1) Gun metal = Anthracite gray ?
2) Extruding lenses - what is your opinion - with respect to durability, moisture, dust etc. For my specific marathonrunning need, I need a robust camera.
3) Your experience with the Z750 ? Happy ? It was on top of my list before I learned about the lens problems.

I have been reading a LOT of reviews these past days, these are my findings - perhaps you could comment briefly:

1) Image quality is - overall - best at Canon.
2) Casio rules on speed and battery life, MPEG-4 movies, special functions.
3) Sony P200 and Kodak V530/V550 rules on ´no redeye´.
4) Portability is merely the same - Casio S500 and Sony T7/T9 being particular slim.

What could eventually takethe Kodaks off the listare the poor battery life. Same partly true for the Canons as well ?

I do hope I'll find time for a few comments, regards

Tor




















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Old Jan 14, 2006, 2:08 PM   #15
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I've had the Z750 for nearly a year now and really like it. It is my 5th digital camera and the best designed. I never used movies on digital cameras except to test them. But the movies on the Casio are good enough considering the alternative is no movies at all if you don't have a camcorder with you. The past movie mode is especially handy. You just aim the camera and wait for something worth filming to happen. When it does you start recording and the buffer adds the previous 5 seconds. It saves a lot of editing from grinding away waiting for something to happen. The Z750 does give red eye. I have no problem removing it, but it can be a hassle.

The resolution is better than the SD450. In resolution tests it falls between the SD500 and SD550. They are all three so close you wouldn't see any difference. The only small camera with better numbers is the Fuji F10, and then only slightly.

I like the control setup. It is easy to get to anything quickly. The permanent memory not only allows for a pretty large permanent album, but you can store custom settings with photos to remind you of the conditions. I had though the US model number initially was Z750G for gunmetal, but anthracite gray is probably a better description and is the official European designation.

I don't know about the added reliability of the folded lenses. It seems there would be less access for moisture or dust, but I really have no ides. Some of the weatherproof models like the Oly Stylus series have extending lenses, so they can be sealed. The Sony T series isn't listed as weatherproof, so I would exercise care regardless of the lens type.

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Old Jan 14, 2006, 2:57 PM   #16
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My gosh, so I have to put the Z750 back on the list.

So, I think my choices are these:

Casio Z750 or Sony T9 or Canon SD450.

Does one really stand out ? Here we go again...arrhghhh

Tor






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Old Jan 15, 2006, 11:49 PM   #17
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Tor-

I honestly and sincerely believe that the Kodak V-530 and V-550 should still remain on your priority list. You might ask why? Take a look at this photo taken just today as we drove at 75mph from California into Oregon without stopping. Think about it as if you were running.

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Old Jan 16, 2006, 5:56 AM   #18
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Hi MT,

how about battery life ? How about durability...during running, you'll expect some 'bumping around' and some sub-optimal conditions for the camera ?

I agree with you that the V530 is cheap and hence attractive.

Also: which memorycard should I buy ?

Tor








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Old Jan 16, 2006, 11:01 AM   #19
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Tor-

The battery life for the V-530 is not fantastic. It will take about 125 photos on a single charge, based on my experience. It is pretty durable, and it surely produces both the photos (as you have seen me post)and the mpeg-4 videos with ease.

MT
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Old Jan 17, 2006, 3:18 PM   #20
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You may want to consider any of the Olympus Stylus series.

They are water resistant (and therefore sweat resistant too)

They are tiny...'bout size of deck of cards.
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