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View Poll Results: My top picks are:
Olympus E-330 3 4.55%
Olympus E-500 9 13.64%
Nikon D50 15 22.73%
Nikon D70s 3 4.55%
Canon Rebel XT 9 13.64%
Canon 20D 11 16.67%
Pentax *ist DL2 5 7.58%
Waiting for Panasonic's DSLR 2 3.03%
Waiting for new announcments this month 6 9.09%
Haven't decided yet !? 3 4.55%
Voters: 66. You may not vote on this poll

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Old Feb 20, 2006, 11:20 AM   #101
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The only way to gauge how two compares compare is to take photos in identical conditions with both, using similar settings, with lenses that are as close as possible in their design.

Even then, you're going to have differences that may not result in one being better compared to another in real world use. One model may work better in some conditions compared to another, and vice-versa.

You also have some lattitude in how images are processed via in camera settings. As a general rule, entry level models tend to have more "punch" straight from the camera (contrast, saturation, sharpening algorithms). To an untrained eye, this can be better. But, most models allow you to adjust these parameters to some extent.
When you try to overprocess images, you can end up with things like color bleed, halos around high contrast edges, loss of Dynamic Range when contrast is boosted too much, etc. (which is why most DSLR models have images needing a bit more post processing using their defaults, to try and preserve as much "real" detail as possible).

Shooting in raw and converting later is a way to bypass the in camera processing, so that you eliminate some of the quirks associated with how a given manufacturer processes the images in camera.


If you don't want to post process, certainly look at the differences between how JPEG images come out of a camera, as each manufacturer tends to approach it differently. Some users may prefer more saturation, higher contrast, etc., and some may want a more conservative approach to image processing.

There's no one choice that's perfect for every user. You'll have to decide. But, make sure you're comparing images taken in the same conditions that you'll use one in more often (and again, unless you're comparing models in identical conditions, with similar settings and lenses, you can't really tell how they compare).

Is it important that the camera you choose is technically better compared to another one? It may not be.

A lot of the time, camera shoppers are "splitting hairs" between images, looking at them at 100% viewing size to try and discern every fault. If you're going to be sticking with typical print and viewing sizes, then small differences probably won't be noticed anyway.

There is no one perfect choice in a camera. Get the model that you're more comfortable with. None of them are bad cameras and each will have pros and cons, depending on the user's preferences and the conditions it's used in.

For me, higher ISO performance, lens availability, etc., ruled out the Oly models. I don't want to pay >$2000 to get an Oly 35-105mm f/2 zoom, when I can find third party f/2.8 lenses for competing DSLR models for far less money (with a LOT of choices), and in my opinion, you'd need a lens that's a stop faster for the Oly models to make up for the difference in noise compared to some of the competing DSLR products.

If you're not shooting in existing light, then it's probably not an issue.

Another consideration with the Oly models is that they will have greater depth of field for any given 35mm equivalent focal length, focus distance and aperture. That's because their sensors are smaller than competing DSLR products, letting them use a shorter actual focal length lens for any given angle of view. That impacts Depth of Field.

If you want more depth of field, that's a good thing. If you don't, you'd need to use lenses with larger available apertures to match the shallower DOF you'd have with the competing DSLR models to help subjects stand out from distracting backgrounds.

There are pros and cons to any choice.

P.S.

You can get great photos out of any of these DSLR models. Your skill as a photographer is going to be more important compared to the differences between these camera models in most conditions.

Also, when looking a manufacturer's samples (as it appears you are doing, too), they are going to be designed to look good (a lot of work probably went into getting images that put the camera in a better light).

Want to see great detail, tonal range, saturation, etc., from a digital camera, producing images with lots of punch? Take a look at this image from a pocket camera (Konica Revio KD-510z). It's one of the samples that Konica posted when they started marketing it.

Because it's target market was the consumer segment, it's got more contrast, sharpening and saturation compared to many cameras. That can be a very nice thing, or a bad thing, depending on your perspective; and you can bet that a lot of images were taken before they decided on the best ones to post in order to put the camera in a better light (and they used the lowest available ISO speed, too).

http://www.pbase.com/kd510z/image/17408303/original

The camera is only a tool.


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Old Feb 20, 2006, 11:47 AM   #102
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Thanks for the intelligent reply, Camera is "not only a tool" it is the tool that we need to carry with us so Ergonomics and Size are important factors, never less there is the joy factor that one has decided to buy a digital camera that will make the action of taking photographs a pleasure.

If it wasn't like that why do we need the back LCD for, Using a Large Back LCD will give one a better flexibility (Live View) and convenient (Browsing through images and checking out of focus images, see menu option in day light and have large fonts for easier reading for people who needs it the most).

Smaller body means better maneuverability and a well built construction feels good in hand.

When you buy a digital camera instead of film, Digital cameras brings new technologies that makes taking photos a really great pleasure, of course at the end you come home and upload the photos to your computer and do what ever one wants to do with them.

High ISO performance is important factor, and for people that are used to storing pictures on there computer will enjoy the fact that the pictures that are taken from the Olympus camera are from a 4/3 sensor and printing pictures (if decided to) can be enlarge cause of the 7.5MP without any compromises on quality, most of the people that bought and used P&S cameras, are used to a maximum 400 ISO so upgrading to a DSLR that can go fairly well at 1600 ISO is a large step for them and plenty enough.

Many people pass the Rebel XT cause of the built quality, My father did, even tough that this is an amazing camera (bad lens kit) people want to feel the good construction in there handthat what you all say "Go to a store and hold it in your hand and decide what is better for you".

Live-View is a welcome option that will evolved in the future for sure, and I can't say more about comparing those entry level cameras,but people who try the Olympus felt in love with it, just because it is such a joy to take photographs with, just like when you buy a cellular phone they are all the same tools that take calls but the difference is the Joy factor and extra features that other don't have thats why people upgrade so often.


We'll wait for he reviews on this new DSLR (High ISO... etc) and then we will decide.


Thanks for your reply to my post and for sure everyone has different needs FOR SURE !







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Old Feb 20, 2006, 1:08 PM   #103
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One thing I forgot to mention is the battery's life that probably will not performs well cause of the large live-view LCD ? Does somebody has any clue ?
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Old Feb 20, 2006, 3:47 PM   #104
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More Olympus E-330, Flash introduction from Korean Olympus web site:


[align=center]TAKE A LOOK[/align]
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[align=center]Let us know and help others to decide. VOTE NOW ![/align]
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Old Feb 20, 2006, 5:32 PM   #105
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I've put some E-330 noisy images at high ISO through Neat-Image and WOW! it's really a gem, reducing the noise without compromising on detail lose, really amazing achievment.

Have you tried this software, and does it give a DSLR cameras that suffer from noisy high-iso images a good solution for reducing noise from images ??
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Old Feb 20, 2006, 8:38 PM   #106
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Evolt 500

Loved shooting with a friend's Olympus C-4040, read all of the reviews and the E-500 appeared to be the best value in its class.

So farI am very happy. Is it perfect? No. But that's why there are $10,000.00 dSLR's. You get what you pay for. The E-500 packs a LOT for what you pay for.

Cheers,

DRG
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Old Feb 21, 2006, 10:43 AM   #107
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drgcreationsDid you managed to put your E-500 through noise-ninja or neat-timage ? If so can you tell your impressions ?
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Old Feb 21, 2006, 12:08 PM   #108
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Hello!



Yes I purchased Noise Ninja a few weeks after purchasing my E-500. It definitely helps a lot at high EV steps and higher ISO levels over 400. I still try not to shoot anything over ISO 800 if I can help it.


I can send you some before and after images using Noise Ninja. I use Noise Ninja on all of my files regardless of ISO or EV step in order to ensure that all of my images are as crisp as can be. It's a great program. Well worth the $80.

If Olympus can engineer a new E-1 or E-500to handle noise as well as Canon models in the same class I think they'll have a real winner on their hands and we'll see a lot of Canon faithfuls make the leap over the Olympus.

Cheers,
DRG
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Old Feb 21, 2006, 12:13 PM   #109
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How is the high ISO preformance of the Nikon D50 Vs. the Olympus E-500 ?
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Old Feb 21, 2006, 12:46 PM   #110
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Because of the smaller sensor, the E-500 will inherently have more noise, and thus require more post processing. I've successfully made 11x14 prints from D50/D70 @ 1600 iso after using noise ninja. The D50 is actually a little better at higher ISO's than the D70.
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