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View Poll Results: My top picks are:
Olympus E-330 3 4.55%
Olympus E-500 9 13.64%
Nikon D50 15 22.73%
Nikon D70s 3 4.55%
Canon Rebel XT 9 13.64%
Canon 20D 11 16.67%
Pentax *ist DL2 5 7.58%
Waiting for Panasonic's DSLR 2 3.03%
Waiting for new announcments this month 6 9.09%
Haven't decided yet !? 3 4.55%
Voters: 66. You may not vote on this poll

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Old Feb 21, 2006, 3:28 PM   #131
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please take a look here, scroll down.. there is an image of a girl taken with 28mm and 200mm, How can it be if the photographer stands at the same distance from the subject and for both focal ranges the girl occupies the same space in both images. :?
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Old Feb 21, 2006, 3:30 PM   #132
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Idan wrote:
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My other question is: What is EISA and why did The Canon Rebel XT won this EISA award ?


EISA is the European Imaging and Sound Association.

http://www.eisa-awards.org/

You'll see information on how awards are won on the page I just posted a link to (it's based on votes, mostly from editors of popular magazines). Here are some members:

http://www.eisa-awards.org/members.html

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Are those awards have any significant meanings to you deciding which camera to buy ?
Not to me.



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Old Feb 21, 2006, 3:34 PM   #133
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Idan wrote:
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please take a look here, scroll down.. there is an image of a girl taken with 28mm and 200mm, How can it be if the photographer stands at the same distance from the subject and for both focal ranges the girl occupies the same space in both images.
You couldn't. You would need to be shooting at a distance of more than 7 times further away to achieve the same framing between a 28mm and 200mm lens.

The page didn't say they were taken with the same distance from subject (the girl). It was only demonstrating the differences you'd have in perspective shooting with different focal length lenses, while keeping the subject occuping the same percentage of the frame.

The difference in shooting distance is what causes differences in perspective (making the background elements appear to be more compressed/closer together with longer distances, and less compressed/more spread out with closer shooting distances).


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Old Feb 21, 2006, 3:37 PM   #134
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Does noise looks different when looking at the same image, one on an LCD an the other one on CRT, LCD is sharper so probably noise wil stand out more, is it right ?
So when people report and post about noise it is very subjective and depends on many other not related to noise issues.
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Old Feb 21, 2006, 3:43 PM   #135
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Do you need to calibarate your monitor to prsent the image accuratley as posibble to the same brightness and contrast that it was gotten from the camera ?
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Old Feb 21, 2006, 3:43 PM   #136
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Quote:
please take a look here, scroll down.. there is an image of a girl taken with 28mm and 200mm, How can it be if the photographer stands at the same distance from the subject and for both focal ranges the girl occupies the same space in both images.
The photographer DOES NOT stand on the same spot. He moves so that the girl is about the same size on all shots.

Check this out:
http://www.canon.co.jp/Imaging/enjoydslr/p_2_013.html

Main Page. This is a great site for SLR newbies, it helped me A LOT!:
http://www.canon.co.jp/Imaging/enjoydslr/index.html


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Old Feb 21, 2006, 3:47 PM   #137
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Does having a blinking spots on a DSLR when the shadows are closer to be black and the highlights closer to white is like having a live Histrogram ?
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Old Feb 21, 2006, 3:47 PM   #138
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Idan wrote:
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Do you need to calibarate your monitor to prsent the image accuratley as posibble to the same brightness and contrast that it was gotten from the camera ?
Monitors do require calibration to insure they are accurately reproducing the colors. Photoshop has a simple gamma calibration, or you can buy a standalone calibration device with software, ie Colorvisions Spyder.

Noise should not appear any differently whether its viewed on a CRT or LCD. Noise is also somewhat dependent on viewing distance and size. Larger images will show more noise, as will images that are viewed very closely.
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Old Feb 21, 2006, 3:51 PM   #139
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Idan wrote:
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Does having a blinking spots on a DSLR when the shadows are closer to be black and the highlights closer to white is like having a live Histrogram ?
Kind of, but not completely. A histogram will show how balanced exposure is throughout the entire image from shadow to highlights. The "blinking lights" is one way to measure correct highlight exposure. If highlights are blinking they may be overexposed. The best course is to try to dial back you exposure compensation 1/3 of a stop or so and compare the images. Often if you're shooting RAW, slight blinking highlights may not be so bad in the final image.

Also, a live histogram is just that. You are seeing the actual histogram prior to exposure thus allowing you to make adjustments before shooting. The "blinking Highlights" only appear after the shot. No current DSLRs have live histograms (i don't think).
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Old Feb 21, 2006, 3:52 PM   #140
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Idan wrote:
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Do you need to calibarate your monitor to prsent the image accuratley as posibble to the same brightness and contrast that it was gotten from the camera ?
Here are two sites with lots of information. You'll usually want to make sure you have your monitor set to the correct temperature (for example, 6500K) and then calibrate your graphics card via the manufacturer's driver controls, and/or use a utility like Adobe Gamma.

http://www.epaperpress.com/monitorcal/index.html

http://www.normankoren.com/makingfineprints1A.html

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