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View Poll Results: My top picks are:
Olympus E-330 3 4.55%
Olympus E-500 9 13.64%
Nikon D50 15 22.73%
Nikon D70s 3 4.55%
Canon Rebel XT 9 13.64%
Canon 20D 11 16.67%
Pentax *ist DL2 5 7.58%
Waiting for Panasonic's DSLR 2 3.03%
Waiting for new announcments this month 6 9.09%
Haven't decided yet !? 3 4.55%
Voters: 66. You may not vote on this poll

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Old Feb 19, 2006, 10:02 AM   #81
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Meryl I think your wrong. The 'throw in' kits are very good indeed, substantially better than any P&S camera and you can get it for cheaper than the R1 you mention.

There are many discussions about digital vs film, but from my point of view I have much more fun and shoot alot more with my digital than I ever did with film.
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Old Feb 19, 2006, 11:45 AM   #82
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The funny thing is that the 'kit lenses' that they sell with film SLRs are not known for their quality and, in many cases, they are the same lenses they sell with digital SLRs.
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Old Feb 19, 2006, 12:23 PM   #83
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If I buy an all-around lens that as we all know has compromises in optical quality compared to other lenses that cover less focal range, will I be able to correct those optical distortions with software like DXO and there for not buying 2 or more lenses that give the same coverage of focal range and better optical qualities.

In short, Does having a software that corrects the distortions caused by All-Around cheap lens can give better results and correct the distortions, there for it's an alternative having those two (software +"all-around" lens) compared to having more lenses that cover the same focal range for a much higher price and gives better results without editing software? (NOT that short isn't it :-))

:!:software like DXO shows a great effectivenes in correcting opticalproblems caused by cheap lenses.
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Old Feb 19, 2006, 12:33 PM   #84
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C'mon now Meryl...

On the one hand, you're discussing your Zeiss lenses, letting everyone know that one of them costs more than your Sony V3.

On the other hand, we're debating the quality of kit lenses that cost virtually nothing in comparison when you get them in the DLSR kits. Ditto for a lot of the cheap kit lenses that were included with 35mm cameras.

That doesn't make them bad lenses, depending on what you plan to use them for, and you have the flexibility to change lenses with a DSLR. For example, get a sharp and bright prime if you need something better for some conditions.

An inexpensive 35-70mm zoom, or a 50mm prime is all some 35mm SLR owners ever bought, and the lenses meet their needs just fine.

Since you're using the "sweet spot" of a lens with most entry level DSLR models because of their smaller sensors compared to 35mm film, you can get pretty decent results from lenses that may be "so so" on a full frame camera. Made for Digital Only lenses will have more demanding design requirements for equivalent results, but they may be all some users ever need.

Not everyone needs a tack sharp lens at wide open apertures with no distortion, great contrast and color, little to no fringing, etc. and each users' purpose for the images is going to vary (some users may rarely print anything at larger sizes, and even if they do, they may be perfectly happy with the results). It often takes a trained eye to even notice the differences (not everyone looks for imperfections, you know).

Each solution is a compromise (size, weight, cost, focal range, optical quality, build quality, etc.), and no one choice is going to be right for everyone in all conditions.

Ditto for film versus digital. There are pros and cons to both choices and the convenience of digital (combined with nice high ISO performance in some of the newer DSLR models) is important to many users.

As a general rule, I typically encourage a buyer of a DSLR that doesn't have much experience with cameras to go with a cheaper solution (i.e., those kit lenses). LOL

Then, if they run into limitations, they'll have a better idea of what to look for to better meet their needs, without a big investment up front in lenses that they may not want/'need for their purposes.


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Old Feb 19, 2006, 1:19 PM   #85
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Idan wrote:
Quote:
If I buy an all-around lens that as we all know has compromises in optical quality compared to other lenses that cover less focal range, will I be able to correct those optical distortions with software like DXO and there for not buying 2 or more lenses that give the same coverage of focal range and better optical qualities.
You can correct most barrel and pincusion distortion relatively easy with modern tools. You can even correct some fringing, to a point.

But, you can't capture detail not captured to begin with because the lens wasn't sharp enough to resolve it (especially at wide open apertures). You can't get the same amount of contrast by PP if the lens had too much loss of contrast from flare. You can't get sharper edges because a lens design left them soft (although you may be able to give an illusion of more sharpness via software).

You can't make a lens focus better in less than optimum lighting "after the fact" if it wasn't bright enough to begin with for the Autofocus sensors, or get detail back because you had shutter speeds too slow to prevent motion blur from subject movement or camera shake, etc., etc.

Sure, software can improve images, to a point. Again, any choice is a compromise. Depending on your use for the images, one of the lenses with better than average focal range may be just fine, for you, in the condtions you'll use one in.

Each user will need to decide for themselves what they really need, and that usually comes with experience.


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Old Feb 19, 2006, 4:53 PM   #86
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Is there any advantages of having 8MP compare to 6MP regarding photo-editing software (manipulation of the image) ?
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Old Feb 19, 2006, 5:17 PM   #87
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My other question that is:

I know that the shutter in each DSLR camera has a life span of around ~150,000 shots. Is it posibble to replace the shutter with a new one or if the shutter goes bad the cameras goes away with it (making buying a second-hand not an option)?



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Old Feb 19, 2006, 8:32 PM   #88
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To try to answer your most recent questions (your up to about 100 now:G). The difference between 6 and 8 mp is not substantial. 8mp does give you a little more leeway in cropping if you have an issue getting the composition right while shooting. That being said, I've made excellent 12x17 prints with 6mp.

In terms of shutter lifespan, I guess that could be an issue. Even with film slrs, shutters had a limited lifespan, so that really hasn't changed as we've progressed to digital. 150,000 actuations will let you shoot about 40 shots a day for 10 years. So although you can never be sure how many times a used camera's shutter has been fired, I don't think you'll have to worry about a shutter failing on you if you buy used. I think this is especially true when buying an entry level DSLR...it's not likely to have experienced seriously heavy use. That being said, I don't think the price difference between new and used DSLR bodies is compelling enough to make me buy used, especially if it was going to be my primary camera. Used lenses on the other hand, are significant values, and should always be considered.
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Old Feb 19, 2006, 8:35 PM   #89
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First thanks for the reply, But can it be fixed or not ?
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Old Feb 19, 2006, 8:56 PM   #90
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Guys you have to see those photos taken with the Olympus E-330, I must say that the colors by any meaning are AWSOME the clarity of those photos are unbelievable. I am looking at photosagain and againand, dammm, those images just pop out from my screen.

It is just that goooodd !

Photo samples CLICK HERE (..*****oll down to the images section)

Give me your opinion guys.
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