Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > What Camera Should I Buy?

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Feb 26, 2006, 9:45 AM   #21
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 63
Default

How dark of a setting does it have to be before my camera will have a bit of trouble?
Straylightrun00 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 26, 2006, 9:47 AM   #22
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

If you aren't trying to take photos without a flash indoors (and make sure you are within the rated flash range), don't even worry about the differences in the models you're considering.

You don't need higher ISO speeds if you're using a flash indoors (unless you're trying to squeeze more range out of one, since each time you double the ISO speed, flash range increases by 1.4x). Although I personally prefer not to use a flash indoors if lighting permits, so I don't get a "deer in the headlights" look to images. Bouncing a flash can help to overcome this look.

In better light outdoors, you may not need higher ISO speeds either (although for less than optimum lighting, higher ISO speeds are desirable).

For night sports, concerts, etc., where you may not be able to use a flash (outside of it's range), higher ISO speeds are a must (as is a bright lens).

So, if you plan on taking photos in concerts (especially if the lighting isn't that great), I'd make sure to get a model that has lower noise as ISO speeds are increased.

But, keep in mind that some venues won't allow you to get in if a camera looks too "professional", and a DSLR using a larger lens (and brighter lenses are larger and heavier) will look professional.

The D200 will have much better high ISO performance compared to most non-DSLR models. So, at most larger indoor concerts (where they tend to have better stage lighting), you should be OK with one.

You'll get some noise at ISO speeds are increased (as you will with any camera). But, you can use software to help reduce it's appearance later if it's too noticeable at the viewing and print sizes needed.

The D200 has some QC problems with banding (noise patterns with lines through images) at higher ISO speeds being reported by some owners. But, if you get one with this problem, Nikon should be able to improve it for you if you send it in for service.

You can find lots of articles on the net about it:

Google Search for Nikon D200 Banding

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 26, 2006, 9:58 AM   #23
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 63
Default

Thanks Jim, also I was wondering if you had an example picture of an extremely low light situation I could see?
Straylightrun00 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 26, 2006, 10:05 AM   #24
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

Steve hasn't reviewed the D200 yet, so we don't have any samples from it here. I've looked at my share of them on other web sites, though. Viewing and print sizes also come into the equation. If you aren't going to be printing at larger sizes, noise tends to get averaged out (and you can very good software tools to reduce it's appearance, too).



JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 26, 2006, 5:34 PM   #25
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 63
Default

Well, Jim do you have a picture that you took in the dark that can show me the kind of performance I will be seeing?* I just want to see what you mean by dark, it might be on a different level of dark that i take my pictures in, and that would help me determine if i am happy with the quality i will get.* Thanks!* Also, as for photo programs are their any for mac that I could use, or would you just recommend pc software?
Straylightrun00 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 26, 2006, 5:54 PM   #26
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

Straylightrun00 wrote:
Quote:
Well, Jim do you have a picture that you took in the dark that can show me the kind of performance I will be seeing?
I can show you low light pics from my KM 5D if that's what your asking. But, that's not going to show you how a D200 would perform.

Here is a recent thread with one from my 5D in it:

http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...c.php?id=83666

Here is another:

http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...mp;forum_id=87

and another (just straight from the camera jpegs):

http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...c.php?id=76045


Quote:
Also, as for photo programs are their any for mac that I could use, or would you just recommend pc software?
I don't have a Mac, so I'm probably not the best one to ask. I remember seeing some announcements about Apple's Aperture Product recently. Photoshop CS2 is a popular choice, too (as is Photoshop Elements).

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 26, 2006, 6:57 PM   #27
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 63
Default

are those what pics look like taken in the dark?* They don't look so clear, I am probably confused though
Straylightrun00 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 26, 2006, 7:03 PM   #28
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

Those are ISO 3200 images at very slow shutter speeds. So, you're going to have some motion blur. Also, they were taken at larger apertures (which means that you'll have a very shallow Depth of Field).

IOW, they were designed to demonstrate that it's possible to get hand held photos in conditions that you would not normally be able to take photos in without a tripod or flash (if within flash range).

You can't normally take photos in light so low you'd need ISO 3200 with shutter spees of 1/5 second and f/2.5 (as in some in that last thread I posted a link to), unless you're using a tripod (and even then, you're going to get some motion blur from subject movement).

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 26, 2006, 7:34 PM   #29
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 63
Default

I see, would you recommend that I take a photography class, to further understand?
Straylightrun00 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 26, 2006, 7:48 PM   #30
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

That's up to you.

If you're going from a Sony T1 to a Nikon D200, that's a big jump.

You'll have a learning curve with it.

For one thing, Depth of Field (the amount of an image in focus as you are further away from your focus point) will be much shallower for any given Aperture, Focus Distance and Focal Length.

That's because Depth of Field is based on the actual (versus 35mm equivalent) focal length, focus distance and aperture.

If you're using larger apertures (smaller f/stop numbers) you'll have a shallower depth of field. The closer to your subject, the shallower the depth of field, and the longer the focal length, the shallower the depth of field.

To get an idea of how this relationship works, see this handy Depth of Field calculator. But, keep in mind that you'll need to shoot from closer distances if you use a shorter focal length, for your subject to occupy the same percentage of the frame.

http://www.dofmaster.com/dofjs.html

The other thing you need to be should be aware of is how light levels, ISO speed and aperture impact the shutter speeds you can expect to get (and still have properly exposed iimages).

You can't take photos in total darkness. You need some light. The less light you have, the longer your shutter speeds will be for any given ISO speed and aperture.

If your shutter speeds are not fast enough, you'll get blur from camera shake (if you're not using a tripod) and blur from subject movement. But, you have to leave the shutter open enough for proper exposure. Otherwise, you'll get dark images.

See this handy online exposure calculator to get a better idea of this relationship. Note that Film Speed in the calculator is the same thing as ISO speed:

http://www.robert-barrett.com/photo/...alculator.html

If you are trying to take photos in low light, you need higher ISO speeds and larger apertures (smaller f/stop numbers) in order to try and keep shutter speeds fast enough to reduce blur from camera shake and/or subject movement. Larger available apertures will also increase lens size, weight and cost.

One of the tradeoffs of using a larger aperture is that depth of field will be shallower. One of the tradeoffs of using higher ISO speeds is that noise will be higher.

It's really not that complicated, once you have a better understanding of exposure.

You'll need to know that in low light you can use Av Mode (aperture priority) setting your aperture to a larger value (set it to smaller f/stop numbers), and the camera will automatically select the correct shutter speed for proper exposure.

If it's not fast enough, increase ISO speeds (each time you double the ISO speed, the camera can use shutter speeds twice as fast for the same lighting and aperture).


JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 7:47 PM.