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Old Feb 27, 2006, 3:33 PM   #51
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Your shutter speeds are bottoming out at 1/8 second in those photos with no flash indoors (that's why they're underexposed, even at ISO 320 and f/3.5).

The camera's autoexposure algorithm probably has a slowest shutter speed of 1/8 second in most modes, and you'd have more motion blur if you tried to go slower anyway.

If budget isn't an issue, my first choice in a lens in the conditions you shot at indoors if you don't want to use a flash (what looked like a very low light club in one, and normal to low indoor lighting in the others), at ranges a 50mm would be to long, I'd go with this lens:

Sigma 30mm f/1.4 EX DC AF Lens

It compares very favorably to Canon and Nikon primes with similar focal lengths.

I wouldn't mind having one to get one more stop over my Minolta 28mm f/2 (f/1.4 is twice as bright). They just announced that it's going to be available in Konica Minolta Maxxum mount, too.

But, you'll need to practice to get used to a shallower depth of field shooting with a DSLR at wider apertures, and you'll need to stop down a bit from wide open if you need greater depth of field, depending on your focus distance, keeping shutter speeds in mind.

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Old Feb 27, 2006, 3:51 PM   #52
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Straylightrun00 wrote:
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One more thing, do the smaller mm mean it will be wider, as far as lens's go?
Yes. You will have a wider angle of view with a shorter focal length lens.


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Old Feb 28, 2006, 12:13 AM   #53
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In terms of low light photos you have to achieve the correct balance of lighting, lens, ISO, and camera. For example, here is a concert photo taken with the Fuji S-9000 at a full 10.8X optical zoom, F 2.8aperture, a shutter speed of 1/28th, and wastaken at ISO 1600. It is a hand held photo under very minimal lighting.

Each factor trades off against each each other so you have to understand the effect of each of them.



In contrast, this photo had a great deal of stage lighting and it was captured at F 2.8 at 1/20 using ISO 400.





So, in short, the volume of light is very important. Always be willing to take a few test photos, and adjust your settings as required.

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Old Feb 28, 2006, 11:53 AM   #54
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So, nikon 50mm f/1.8, 18mm-200mm VR nikon, and the 30mm f/1.4 sigma would be good to start out with?Also, does the sigma offer the same width as a normal Digital camera?And I have heard that sigma lens do not work very well with nikon cameras, is this true or just a rumor?These will be sufficient for concerts, low lighting, action shots, scenery, family photos, sports?
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Old Feb 28, 2006, 1:10 PM   #55
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I think that would make a super combination.

As I said before, if budget were of no concern, i'd personally go with the Sigma 30mm f/1.4 EX DC HSM AF Lens for it for your purposes on a Nikon if you want to go with that camera from the photos you posted (especially the blurry nightlife image you posted that was underexposed at 1/8 second and ISO 320 at f/3.5.

Even with an f/2.8 zoom on it at ISO 1600, you'd still be getting some motion blur from subject movement and camera shake.

So, get you a bright prime for those types of light clubs if you don't want to use a flash.

You could try to compromise with an f/2 or f/1.8 lens. There are several wide primes around at 28 or 35mm at stop down from f/1.4.

If you want to see how a Nikior 28mm f/1.4 compares, B&H is temporarily out of stock, but they can notify you via e-mail when they get more in.

Nikkor 28mm f/1.4D AF lens at B&H

But, it looks like Wolf/Ritz has them in stock at a higher price.

http://www.wolfcamera.com/product/541530150.htm

But, if I were shooting in light that looked as low as it did in the one "nightlife" image, I'd go with a Sigma 30mm f/1.4 EX HSM in a Nikon Mount.

I think it's the best you're going to get wide open, and it's got HSM (hypersonic motor focusing). It should be pretty darn sharp if light is good enough to shoot down a stop with it at f/2 also.

That's what I'd want in light that low on a Nikon DSLR. You can't use it on a 35mm model (or at least not without vignetting if it worked).

Even with a Minolta 28mm f/2 on my KM 5D at ISO 3200 with anti-shake in one local establishment with a piano bar, I need another stop to get some sharper pics from motion blur alone trying to use it at f/2.0 - f/2.5. Shutter speeds are as slow as 1/5 second there using it that way, and I try to keep it stopped down to f/2.5 to improve sharpness from wide open.

I wouldn't mind having a Sigma f/1.4 my KM 5D for use in light that low (and Sigma just announced it will be available for Konica Minolta DSLR models) and I'd take it over the Nikkor if you want a D50 for club hopping even if the price were the same from the opinons I've read of the Nikkor wide open, and the opinions I've seen from respected individuals of the Sigma at wide open apertures.

The only "niggle" you sometimes hear is the Bokeh may not be quite as good on the Sigma. You'll have to be the judge what's more important.

So, if your clubs have light that low, you'll want the sharpest lens you can get at wide open apertures, even if one lens performs better as it stops down more.

Angle of view with this lens will be the same as the angle of view would with a lens designed for full frame cameras if you used both of them on a Hikon DSLR (you'd need to multiply the focal length by 1.52x to see how the angle off view compares to the same focal length lenses on a 35mm camera).

So, a 30mm f/1.4 it would provide approximiately the same angle of view as a 45 or 46mm lens would on a 35mm camera (30mm x 1.52x).

As for your choices in the other lenses, that sounds like a killer combination to me.

You'd have walk around lens with the benefits of stabilization, along with some sharper and brighter primes when needed.


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Old Feb 28, 2006, 1:42 PM   #56
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Awesome!¬* Sounds great, thank you again!¬* I was wondering though, why is the nikon 28mm lens so much more than the sigma?¬* And what is a Bokeh?
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Old Feb 28, 2006, 2:06 PM   #57
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Straylightrun00 wrote:
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Awesome! Sounds great, thank you again! I was wondering though, why is the nikon 28mm lens so much more than the sigma? And what is a Bokeh?
You'll have to try them out and tell me. :-)

It does work on 35mm Nikon models, too. The Sigma is projecting a smaller image circle (only works on DSLR models with sensors smaller than 35mm film).

Simply put, the way most people interpret it, Bokeh is the quality of the out of focus areas, with the quality of highiights caused by things like the number of aperture blades and their shape being more important to some users versus others, too. The way edge transtions work in these areas iis also important to many users.

Smoother edges with less sharp and softer transitions are more preferred versus more pronounced edges where you can count the aperture blades, or where the edges may make these areas look like donuts (as in using a mirror lens).

Also, sometimes a higher quality lens from a flatter focus plane perspective may not have the "smoother" bokeh that some users prefer for helping a subject stand out from distracing backgrounds.

So, some users value the quality of the Bokeh more than others, depending on what they are trying to accomplish with a lens.


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Old Feb 28, 2006, 3:10 PM   #58
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thanks again!¬*¬*What does¬*vignetting mean?¬*¬*And just for clarification thenoint/shoot, action photos, sports, scenery, family pictures would be the 18-200mm nikon/50mm nikon 1.8and low light photos would be the 30mm 1.4 and 50mm1.8?
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Old Feb 28, 2006, 3:32 PM   #59
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Straylightrun00 wrote:
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thanks again!What doesvignetting mean?And just for clarification thenoint/shoot, action photos, sports, scenery, family pictures would be the 18-200mm nikon/50mm nikon 1.8and low light photos would be the 30mm 1.4 and 50mm1.8?
It depends on the conditions.

For night sports in a stadium, or indoor sports, the 18-200mm Nikkor isn't going to be bright enough to freeze all of the action.

In a zoom lens, you 'd want something in the 70-200mm range with f/2.8 throughout the focal range at a minimum, and for indoors, you may want to use a brighter prime, depending on the lighting.

f/2.8 is 4 times as bright as f/5.6 (where you'd be on the long end of the Nikkor 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6), allowing shutter speeds 4 times as fast for the same lighting and ISO speed. A brighter lens helps the camera's AF sensors "see" better in less than optimum lighting, too (and you'll have a brighter viewfinder in low light).

A popular choice is the Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 EX Lens (available in several flavours).

Nikon makes a lens with VR and f/2.8 available in this focal range also.

These lenses also tend to have better optical quality compared to lenses with a bigger range from wide to long.

But, for use in better lighting, you may not want to lug one around all the time, and you'll still want something starting out wider for other uses.



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Old Feb 28, 2006, 10:38 PM   #60
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I see, but for just outside plain shots i can use the 50 mm or 18-200mm?
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