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Old Feb 26, 2006, 1:52 PM   #41
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When shooting in RAW mode can you still see the picture in the LCD to know if you shot what you wanted or can delete it from the camera?
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Old Feb 26, 2006, 1:53 PM   #42
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For the maximum potential quality, shoot in raw. That's unprocessed information from your sensor (it's been converted to digital via the analog to digital converter, but nothing else has been done to it other than adding some metadata to the files that converters and browsers can use).

If you shoot in jpeg or tiff, then the camera has already processed the image (demosaic algorithms, adjusted sharpening, contrast, saturation, white balance, etc.).

There are a variety of tools available to process raw images, and these tools are continuing to improve. You'll also find major differences in the way different raw converters approach converting images from raw (and improvements are being made all the time).

So, you may be able to reprocess cherished images later as advances are made with even better tools.

If you shoot in jpeg or tiff, it's too late (the image as already been processed by the camera). Sure, you can make adjustments to a jpeg file, to a point. But, you're working with 8 bits per channel versus 16 bits per channel, and the demosaic process has already been performed. So, you're not going to extract any detail that was destroyed by the camera's processing of the data from the sensor.

I've started shooting almost exclusively in raw with a Maxxum 5D I've got now. But, it can write to media at about 1 frame per second with a fast card shooting in raw, after it's buffer is full. So, it's not as big of a performance penalty to shoot that way (for the type of shooting I normally do) compared to most non-DSLR models.

I'd rather have a powerful computer converting the images from raw using advanced algorithms, versus the camera trying to do it in a split second between shots.

Of course, you've also got an extra step (or steps if you want to further enhance the images after they're converted) involved if you shoot raw. That takes time and many camera owners may not want to mess with it.


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Old Feb 26, 2006, 1:55 PM   #43
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DJMic wrote:
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When shooting in RAW mode can you still see the picture in the LCD to know if you shot what you wanted or can delete it from the camera?
Yes, and you can also shoot raw + jpeg with many models (including the KM Maxxum 5D), so that you've got a jpeg image ready to use, along with a raw file that you can convert and get even better results if needed.

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Old Feb 26, 2006, 2:01 PM   #44
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Now that's a cool feature!
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Old Feb 26, 2006, 2:01 PM   #45
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RAW is where the action is.

If you need any help, I'm sure JimC or myself wouldn't mind if you private messaged us.

Assuming your committed to learning and quality photogrpahy, of course.

But first you must get that 5D happening, AND LET THE JOURNEY BEGIN!

-- Terry
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Old Feb 26, 2006, 2:05 PM   #46
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Thanks so much! I can't wait to get shooting!
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Old Feb 26, 2006, 2:19 PM   #47
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Now, as I've mentioned before, your skill as a photographer is going to be more important than the differences in most camera models.

You'll see lots of debates and "pixel peeping" as it's often referred to (where forum members and reviewers examine every minute detail of image quality, often at sizes you'd never view or print at). ;-)

Also, the model that may look better this week, may not look better next week, as new models are introduced. LOL

But, that doesn't mean the older model is going to quit taking good photos.

It's a constant race between manufacturers to try and grab and keep market share.

That type of competition benefits all of us in the long run, since we'll have more choices at lower prices.

So, don't get too caught up in the differences between them, unless you have a specific need for what one model provides over another, for the types of conditions you'll be shooting in, at the print and viewing sizes needed.

Even a 2 or 3 Megapixel camera can produce images that are all most consumers ever need.

Also, consider that any opinion you read in the forums here is likely to be biased, including mine. LOL

Read the reviews here, paying particular attention to the review conclusion section, where you'll see how one model stacks up against others within a market niche. Then, make up your own mind what's best for how you will be using a camera.

Also, I'd make sure to go down to a store and try out cameras you're considering, to make sure you're comfortable with things like viewfinder usability, speed of operation, ergonomics, control layout, etc..

Different users will have different preferences in a camera, just like different drivers will have different preferences in a vehicle. So, make sure you get a model that you're comfortable with.

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