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Old Mar 13, 2006, 7:55 PM   #1
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Hi,

I'm looking to buy a digital camera and don't quite have the budget for a top of the range SLR, (I'd be looking between 400-500US $)so am considering the digital point and shoots, in particular the sony dscv3 and the fuji fine pix s7000.

I'm aware that these camera's have certain limitations on the depth of field, no interchangeable lenses, focusingetc, but have seen prints from them that look just as good as an SLR such as the nikon D-70s, etc.


I'm just looking for some expertise on what pitfalls I should try to avoid and wether point and shoots are seriously disadvantaged when compared to digital SLR's. If anyone can offer any advice at all, (other camera's, etc) that would be fantastic


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Old Mar 14, 2006, 10:54 AM   #2
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shuggles-

Most consumer dSLR camera in the $500 to $600 price range will take photos under a wider range of shooting circumstances than any point and shoot camera just because they have higher available ISO settings, generally have more resolution, and a better range of available lenses.

So the short answer is this: because dSLR cameras are more capable, generally speaking, they take better photos than most point and shoot cameras. However, the type of shooting circumstances, can cause some variances.

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Old Mar 14, 2006, 11:37 AM   #3
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in your price range the s7000 is 'top of the line'

the main drawback is the shutter-lag between press and 'click'

i own a KM 7D dSLR and a s7000 and am happy with both
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Old Mar 14, 2006, 11:53 AM   #4
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shuggles,

The answer is - it depends on the type of photography you want to do. Under ideal circumstances p&s cameras in that price range will produce photos that look just as good as photos from a DSLR. What a DSLR allows is the ability to shoot in more demanding situations and in those situations increase your chances of getting keepers. For instance, if you shoot sports, the better frame rates and buffer handling and reduced shutter lagof a DSLR will increase the amount of keepers you get. Also, if you shoot in low light situations the DSLRs will have MUCH better high ISO handling (depending on the DSLR). Also for sports and wildlife you often have a need for longer lenses. And yes, 450mm can be short for both those activities.

So, what types of photography are you wanting to do? That will determine whether you need the added capabilities of a DSLR to achieve your goals.
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Old Mar 14, 2006, 3:27 PM   #5
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shuggles wrote:
Quote:
limitations on the depth of field
You mean DOF isn't limited...


Here's something you want to read:
http://www.neocamera.com/feature_dslr.html


Then equally important is what you photograph, low light and moving targets are really area where DSLRs shine while in normal conditions differences aren't such big.

Landscapes and architecture require good wide angle so those P&S you mentioned wouldn't be good choises for that.
Then if it's just wild animals/birds you're after ultrazooms would be reasonable. (as for closest thing for both in one check Fuji S9000/9500, it has 28-300mm lens)

But if you're ready to sacrifice convenience (and more money) DSLRs are great for both because of interchangeable lens.
But if you're after "all in one" camera non-SLRs have video mode which can save the day at some day.
So both sides are compromises on their own way and it's about what you definitely need/want and what things you're ready to sacrifive.


Myself I'm going to stay in top of the class prosumer and wait until DSLRs are really in digital age before considering one.

Here's something I've taken while waiting for that to happen:
http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...90&forum_id=87
http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...35&forum_id=87
Some fast moving targets:
http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...73&forum_id=82
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Old Mar 14, 2006, 7:05 PM   #6
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shuggles-

It all depends on your budget. Get the best camera you can and enjoy the photos. But the truth remains, dSLR cameras offer you more flexibility, capability, and better photos.

MT
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Old Mar 15, 2006, 11:30 PM   #7
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E.T wrote:
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Myself I'm going to stay in top of the class prosumer and wait until DSLRs are really in digital age before considering one.

What do you presently own?
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Old Mar 16, 2006, 4:50 AM   #8
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I have an Olympus c-8080 and I defy anyone to show me better picture quality from say a Rebel XT or Nikon D70. Yes when it comes to using higher ISO then the dSLR is a better camera but I am using mine up to ISO 400 with very good results and below ISO 200 I get excellent results.

It really does depend on what you are going to do with the camera and if high ISO is a priority then think dSLR otherwise there are some great P&S cameras out there that will rival the dSLR without the worry of dust on the sensor, having to change the lens to get that perfect shot not to mention having to spend the extra money on lenses and lugging them around.

Your question is something that only you can answer, but first you must decide what you are going to do with the camera and then your decision will be easier.
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Old Mar 16, 2006, 9:25 AM   #9
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As a Olympus C-8080 owner and a Pentax DS owner I will tell you that both are excellent. However, the DS can be used under more/a wider varietyof photographic conditions/situations than the C-8080 because of its increased capabilities ov er the C-8080.

MT
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Old Mar 16, 2006, 9:42 AM   #10
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a dSLR is more versatile, but when it comes to image quality in low iso (80, 100) there aren't such big differences...it really depends on what you want to do with your cam...
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