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Old Apr 4, 2006, 2:40 PM   #1
rms
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Hi everyone,

Let me start by saying that when it comes to photography, I'm a complete novice/amateur/all-around-dummy. I am looking to buy a new digital camera, though, and I need help choosing the right one. This is what I want to do:

1. Take sport shots and outside shots

2. Take good, sharp close-ups of my family (for cards, frames, etc)

3.Spend less than $1000, preferrably less than $500.

I tried to do some research, but all I could find was that for close-ups you want a wide-angle lens, and for long shots you want a high optical zoom. Is this correct?

A friend has recommended ther Kodak Easyshare 6.1mp Z650, but I want to explore other options.

Please give me some guidance on the right camera for my needs.

Thanks!

Robin
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Old Apr 4, 2006, 4:35 PM   #2
rms
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I see that the Fuji Finepix S9000 is offering a $100 rebate, has a long zoom, and a wide angle lens. Would this be a good choice for me? Net price would be around $420.
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Old Apr 4, 2006, 4:52 PM   #3
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rms wrote:
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1. Take sport shots and outside shots
What kind of sports?

If you need to take photos of indoor sports, or night sports in a stadium, a DSLR model would be a better solution (Konica Minolta Maxxum 5D, Nikon D50, Canon Rebel XT, Pentax *st DS2, etc.). You'll also need a bright lens to go with one.

Otherwise, shutter speeds may be too slow to prevent motion blur in many low light conditions.

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Old Apr 4, 2006, 5:54 PM   #4
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Mainly outdoor softball. I would be interested in a DSLR, but I worry it would be too advanced for me, and I don't have time to take a class.Thanks for the advice! I will definitely check out those cameras.RobinJimC wrote:
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What kind of sports?
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Old Apr 4, 2006, 6:01 PM   #5
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rms wrote:
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Mainly outdoor softball. I would be interested in a DSLR, but I worry it would be too advanced for me, and I don't have time to take a class.
Some of the entry level DSLR models have a Sports Mode designed to set the camera settings to allow faster shutter speeds to help reduce motion blur.

The majority of DSLR models also have an Auto Mode (so that you don't need to "take a class"). ;-)


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Old Apr 4, 2006, 6:07 PM   #6
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Thanks Jim,So are you saying that even if I use the Auto functions on a DSLR, I will get better shots than with other cameras?* I would love to jump into a DSLR, but I'm scared I just checked out that Nikon D50, and it looks so cool.* Thanks for the recommendations
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Old Apr 4, 2006, 6:17 PM   #7
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If you've got the budget, buy a DSLR.

The lenses will become an investment (upgrade the body later and keep the same lenses).

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Old Apr 4, 2006, 6:40 PM   #8
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i'm not that sure that at your actual level you should go directly into dslr, rms. even if dslrs like nikon d50 offer an auto mode and other easy to use features.
i think that there's a learning curve and one shouldn't begin somewhere at the middle of it.
if you want good wide and tele i, for one, would advise panasonic fz7 or even tz1 because they are both great cameras with prices lower than 500$ and offering at the same time good tele values: 12x and respectively 10x all the time being very light and small in size. and, as long as we're on the subject, you should take a look at the sony h2/h5 or even konica minolta z series.
i think that any of those cameras mentioned above would qualify as a great start for you.
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Old Apr 4, 2006, 7:29 PM   #9
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Well, I happen to be a Digital Camera Instructor for our State University. There are many folks that are moving into DSLR cameras from point and shoot cameras. Certainly there is some logic in doing that because the very expensive middle step of moving first to a more sophisticated ultra zoom is eliminated.

In addition, consumer DSLR cameras are well within the price range of the sophisticated ultra zoom cameras. In truth, rms, you should not visualize a DSLR camera as just another point and shoot camera, because it really is not that at all.

Instead, I think it would be much more realistic to visualize the DSLR camera as an honest opportunity for a real learning experience in photography. Yes, you can indeed use the "AUTO" position to get yourself started. However, you will have to go a good bit further along the learning curve to really achieve the very superior image quality that DSLR's are very capable of producing.

Instruction in your local Community College, or even in the Extension Division of your State University would do a great deal to ease that learning curve. But this is well within your capabilities, providing you want to devote some time and effort to it.

MT
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