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Old Apr 7, 2006, 10:43 PM   #31
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Excellent photos, Jim C-

It shows quite well what the K-M 5D is capable of producing.

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Old Apr 8, 2006, 2:15 AM   #32
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Incredibly low noise indeed for ISO 3200. Wow! Pretty girl, too.


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Old Apr 8, 2006, 6:03 PM   #33
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I came up with one other thing which I believe will tip the scale one way or the other. I think it will be the SLR

I need to transfer about 1,000 old 35mm slides to digital. I found that I can just snap a photo of them on a light box that came with a scanner designed for slide scanning. The scanner part broke, and all I have is the lightbox part. My simple Minolta point and shoot does an amazingly good job, however, it does not focus close enough, and does not zoom enough to fill the frame very well. I have to be back too far and the picture gets kind of small.

Which camera will duplicate the slides the best? Close focusing distance is needed That is the camera I will go with.
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Old Apr 8, 2006, 7:09 PM   #34
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stevem-

Fitted with the proper macro lens any consumer DSLR camera will do a particularly good job with duplicate older color slides.

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Old Apr 9, 2006, 3:45 AM   #35
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stevem1928 wrote:
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I found that I can just snap a photo of them on a light box that came with a scanner designed for slide scanning.* The scanner part broke, and all I have is the lightbox part.* My simple Minolta point and shoot does an amazingly good job, however, it does not focus close enough, and does not zoom enough to fill the frame very well.
That definitely means S2 is out of question, wide angle macro is very bad distortion maker (+ CA&corner softness) and its tele macro is quite standard.

Like mtclimber said you can be sure that any DSLR can do the job, on the presumption that you buy separate macro lens. Normal DSLR lenses have much longer minimum focusing distances than non-SLRs and at least here in Europe macro capable lenses definitely aren't cheap (price same as camera body) so without finding used one budget limit might go down from toilet very fast. (ultimate versatility, but you have to pay more)

Actually I wonder do other lenses have shorter minimum focusing distances because Minolta's lenses designated "macro" doesn't focuse really close compared to non-SLRs:
http://konicaminolta.com/products/co...lens/spec.html


Then again here's what KM A200 could do with normal inexpensive close up lense, or with KM's own high quality CL49-200 macro lens, which would fit easily inside your budget.
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Old Apr 9, 2006, 7:54 AM   #36
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E.T wrote: Many users shooting macro don't want a lens that focuses too close. Otherwise, the camera or lens can cast shadows, and you can spook smaller subjects.

One of the drawbacks of the macro modes with most non-DSLR models is that they need to be used at their wide angle lens position (causing barrel distortion and edge softness), and very close focus distances (casting shadows and making lighting difficult). There are some exceptions.

That's one reason many DSLR users select a 90mm or 100mm (or even longer) macro lens versus a shorter macro lens like a 50mm, so that they can fill the frame with the same size subject from further way.

Macro lenses are normally given a rating. A 1:1 Macro lens is lifesize, meaning that it can fill the frame with a subject the size of the film or sensor. A 1:2 Macro lens can fill the frame with a subject twice the size of the film or sensor, a 1:4 Macro lens can fill the frame with a subject 4 times the size of the film or sensor.

Some zoom lenses with a Macro designation fall into this last category (1:4 Macro ability), and are not considered to be true Macro lenses by many users. Even the Konica Minolta 18-70mm f/3.5-5.6 DT Kit lens has 1:4 Macro Ability (even though it does not have the word macro in it's description).

Minolta's 50mm f/2.8 Macro, 100mm f/2.8 Macro and 200mm f/4 Macro lenses fall into the 1:1 category (most desirable), and are extremely sharp lenses.

Minolta also offers a rather exotic and unique 3:1 Macro Lens, the Minolta AF 3x-1x/1.7-2.8 Macro capable of capturing a subject 1/3 the size of the sensor or film, depending on the lens position on it's built in focus rails.

There are a number of lower priced Macro Lenses from third party manufacturers like Sigma, Tamron and Vivitar/Cosina, too.

One good source that lists current Macro Lenses available in Minolta AF mount is here. Most of these lenses also have reviews from Minolta users there:

http://www.dyxum.com/lenses/results....2&offset=0

An inexpensive alternative to a dedicated macro lens is to use extension tubes with a standard lens (like a 50mm f/1.7), allowing the lens to focus closer than normal.

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Old Apr 9, 2006, 8:57 AM   #37
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stevem1928 wrote:
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Which camera will duplicate the slides the best? Close focusing distance is needed That is the camera I will go with.
I wouldn't try that myself. It would be too hard to keep the camera exactly parallel with the slide (although I guess you could try to rig up a tripod and use it as a copy stand).

From time to time, you also see dedicated slide copying devices that attach to a camera. Then, the slide goes in the front of the device, which has a built in diffuser to soften the light.

I know of one device like that designed to work with Minolta Manual Focus lens mounts (someone is selling them on Ebay now). But, I haven't seen any for use with Minolta AF models (although there are lens adapters available to allow MC/MD mount manual focus lenses on a Minolta AF model).

I've got lots of slides myself, and I have yet to scan them (although that would make a good project for me). When I do decide to get around to it, I'll probably use a dedicated scanner for best results.

One way I have seen others mentioning accomplishing the task quickly is simply projecting the slides to a screen, and taking photos of the projection.

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Old Apr 9, 2006, 10:23 AM   #38
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You might be surprised at how well the slides look. Any perspective distortion can becorrected with Photoshop's "Crop perspective". My idea of what looks good is different than yours. I am not going after any super quality. They are not great to begin with. The slides are 40-50 years old.

Here is an example of what I cobbled together in less than 2 min. I taped a slide to the end of a cardboard tube, held the the other end to the camera, zoomed in, and pointed it to the blue sky (45 degreees away from the sun). The copy looks the same to an untrained eye as the original, expet for the maneta tint which can be handled in Photosop.




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Old Apr 9, 2006, 10:25 AM   #39
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Here is my next attempt when using light box.
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Old Apr 9, 2006, 10:35 AM   #40
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As I mentioned earlier in the thread, there are some devices designed to let you do this type of thing. I just haven't seen one designed for Minolta AF models.

Steve even reviewed one years ago for use with Nikon Coolpix Swivel Bodied models. I've still got an old Nikon Coolpix 950 (the camera the adapter was designed for), so that would be an option for me (if I could actually find this adapter). lol

http://www.steves-digicams.com/happenstance.html

Here's another device designed to let you copy slides (no adapter for the camera with this one):

http://www.bugeyedigital.com/product...ome-96msv.html

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