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Old Apr 11, 2006, 3:11 PM   #1
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Hello all! My first post here..I am interested in taking close up pictures of custom knives. My camera budget is $400-$800 but will go over $1000. I want to create multiple image shots..example http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...Siskasmall.jpg

This photo was taken with an old Hp photosmart 720 camera...and some creative software..but this is what I had in mind....I want to use a better camera and less software. Can you also suggest a good lense or lenses I might need...any help would be greatly appreciated..thank you.

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Old Apr 11, 2006, 3:53 PM   #2
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Seems to me like the choice of camera for this kind of work is not as important as the technique used in prepping the shot. Someone who is skilled in background, lighting and composition will take a better picture of his subject with a $200.00 point & shoot than a guy with a $7000.00 DSLR who is not versed in these principles.

Likely a DSLR would be easier to work with just taking into account the larger, clearer viewfinder they offer over the all-in-one cameras. There are choices from almost every manufacturer for DSLR's in the $800.00 range -- including a "standard" kit lens. I've heard that the lenses they offer in these kits are not of the best quality, but I can't vouch for the truth in that. Likely you'll want a lens with macro capability and a modest zoom range. I'm sure that others who do this kind of work can get more specific in their recommendations, but like I said, the equipement nowadays is so good that it takes a back seat to the guy behind the viewfinder.

As far as using less software goes, if that pic you show is a good example of what you want to do, you're going to have to use software. Even if you could find a camera that lets you do multiple in-camera exposures and such, you would likely end up spending at least as much time playing with the camera software as you would with doing it post process -- and probably with a lot less control than computer-based software would give you.

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Old Apr 11, 2006, 5:44 PM   #3
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royknives-

Yes, a DSLR could probably take better knife close-up photos, but it would be at a cost that would be measurably large because a specialized macro lens would be required + the DSLR body. Cost: around $650 to $750.

If this sample would work for you, it was taken with a $200 Kodak V-530 camera. The choice is yours. I use both DSLR camera and point and shoot digital cameras a great deal and aman Instructor of Digital Cameras for our state university.

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Old Apr 12, 2006, 4:42 AM   #4
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Thanks guys... I guess I need to look at the reviews here at Steve's digicams and really see what I need in a camera...I like the idea of a DSLR but I don't think I really need it...maybe just a good point and shoot with a better lense.
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Old Apr 12, 2006, 12:38 PM   #5
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I am a total beginner when it comes to digital cameras...I have an old HP point and shoot and looking to up grade...I have heard alot about the nikon D50 and it's an dslr, but I kinda like the fuji S9000...both in the same price range...what would you guys pick? It's mostly for close ups...of custom knives....but also as the family camera.
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Old Apr 12, 2006, 3:22 PM   #6
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KonicaMinolta A200 would have best macro mode of non-SLRs, other cameras don't have equally good tele macro and common wide angle macros which might focus closer and take shots from slightly smaller area cause heavy distortions, chromatic aberration and corner softness. (plus also make lightning target hard)


Sorry, don't have "more on topic" example but I guess this should show the idea... at least if you have looked inside anything containg electronics.


I could try to find more on topic target tomorrow.
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Old Apr 12, 2006, 6:43 PM   #7
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royknives-

The Fuji S-9000 might be the perfect choice, because a DSLR would require extension tubes or a macro lens which would add measurably to the final cost.

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Old Apr 12, 2006, 6:58 PM   #8
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Thanks MT....I was hoping to get some response from owners of each of these cameras.....to give me there pro's and con's.
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Old Apr 12, 2006, 7:51 PM   #9
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Yes, I am in fact a Fuji S-9000 and a Nikon D-50 owner, myself.

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Old Apr 13, 2006, 3:01 AM   #10
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Here's couple quickly taken more "on topic" examples, actually camera is KM A2 but lens is same.

These are just resized so you could get much smaller area crops from full image, also lens to target distances was 5" so lens doesn't shadow target at all, actually camera's own flash would work well with non-reflective targets.


And from sheath:



If that isn't enough cheap close up lens would give even smaller area with possibly very little quality loss, actually KM's own CL49-200 close up lens wouldn't cause any quality loss while giving shot from ~30mm wide area. (1"=25.4mm)
http://www.pbase.com/viljamix/close_ups&page=3
http://www.pbase.com/mbjorkro/lens_distortion

So in this type of photography non-SLR digicams really beat DSLRs when it comes to "bang per buck."

For comparison here's super macro shot of Fuji S9000 which represents very well smallest area what those wide angle macros can capture... and what quality loss it causes.
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/Fuji...supermacro.JPG
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