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Old May 27, 2006, 11:42 AM   #1
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I'm comparing the 2 lens kits for these cameras from Costco. I originally got the D50 because I thought that it had the longer zoom lens (300mm vs 150mm for the Oly); however, I read that the Olympus is a 2x factor which also makes it a 300mm lens. After comparing both while shooting it appears that the Nikon zooms closer than the Olympus. Is this true? If so, it's not a deal breaker for the Olympus, but I'm wondering if I'm seeing things correctly.

That said, I'm still leaning toward the Olympus because of it's great LCD, dust prevention system, 8.0 megapixels, and small, lighter size.

I appreciate everyones' thoughts on the matter.
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Old May 28, 2006, 6:06 AM   #2
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if you are buying a SLR because upgrading from compact and would not spent to much money further ........I choose a Oly E500 because it more fun to use it compare to D50, unless you are willing to spent many many more money on your system than you should go with Nikon D50, the lenses are more wider to choose.............

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Old May 28, 2006, 9:04 AM   #3
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What is the focal length range of the Nikon d50 lenses you bought? As you said the Olympus e500 has a 2x multiplier so the 150mm Oly lens becomes 300mm. On the Nikon D50 the multiplier is 1.5x. If the long end of the Nikon lens is 300mm then it becomes 450mm on the D50 which would explain what you're seeing. I suspect however that the long end of your Nikon kit lens is 200mm (1.5x makes it 300mm on the camera). I think the other thing to consider in selecting a dSLR over a point and shoot digital is low light capabilities. The larger sensors in the dSLR's produce less noise at higher ISO, meaning better low light performance. The reviews on the Oly 500 show inferior high ISO performance compared to the Nikon D50. Maybe because the D50 sensor is bigger? As the previous poster said, Nikon has a far wider selection of lenses, Oly uses the 4:3 system which limits you to those lenses. I also think you have a wider selction of "hot shoe" flashes to choose from with the Nikon.
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Old May 28, 2006, 9:06 AM   #4
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Gern Blanston wrote:
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After comparing both while shooting it appears that the Nikon zooms closer than the Olympus. Is this true?
It depends on what lens you're using on the Nikon (you didn't say). ;-)

Lenses are marked with their actual focal length. The angle of view is what is changing, depending on the camera you use one on.

For any given focal length lens, a camera with a smaller film or sensor size will have a narrower angle of view (more apparent magnification).

For any given focal length lens, a camera with a larger film or sensor size will have a wider angle of view (less apparent magnification).

To see how the angle of view would compare to a lens on a 35mm camera with the Olympus, multiple the focal length of the lens by 2x. With the Nikon, multiply the focal length of the lens by 1.5x.

Both have sensors smaller than 35mm film, but the Olympus sensor is the smallest, which means it will have more apparent magnification for the same focal length lens compared to the Nikon. But, you can get shorter or longer lenses for either model.

It sounds like you're comparing Apples to Oranges. I'd figure out what you want to shoot, and in what conditions. Then, given your budget, I'd try and select the camera and lenses that best fit your needs, making sure you're comfortable with the choice you select and that it will be able to do what you need.

There are pros and cons to either model.

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Old May 28, 2006, 3:43 PM   #5
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Thanks for the great replies. The Nikon lenses do, in fact, need to be multiplied by 1.5. I'm using the kit lenses on each model. Both were purchased from Costco.

After reading the replies and many professional and user reviews, I think that the E-500 more meets my needs. Thanks so much for the great info.

I was wondering: I like to take my camera wherever I go in my car so that I can get shots as I come across them; however, this necessitates me leaving it in my car for periods of time since it's impractical to take it inside to restaurants, malls, etc. Hence, it sits in the Texas summer heat frequently. I've never had a problem with a camera sustaining heat damage, but after reading the manual's warning, I'm hesitant to continue to do this.

What are your opinions?
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Old May 28, 2006, 3:50 PM   #6
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I wouldn't leave a camera in a hot car. I've got one camera now that part of the rubber grip came off of from heat because I left it in a car.

You should see an old printer I've got that I made the same mistake with. I had some books stacked on top of it, and the heat caused the plastic cover to warp down in the center (and it was a heavy cover).

In a cooler trunk, maybe. But, leaving one inside of the passenger compartment where tempertures can get quite high? IMO, that's not a good idea.

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Old May 29, 2006, 6:04 PM   #7
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Howdy Guys. My first post here.

By way of introduction, let me say that I owned darn near every 35mm system ever built. Still have about seven SLRs. I got into digital a few years ago and the film cameras languised.

I finally got a digital SLR last week: the Olympus E-500. No point in going into the pros and cons now...I'm sure that's already been done.

But I really must comment on a common concern that I see posted so often. Personally, I think it's really a non-issue. Folks always seem to warn that you'll be stuck with four thirds system lenses if you buy Olympus and Nikon has a "much" wider selection. I suppose we could argue numbers but there comes a point when the numbers don't do justice to the practical reality.

As of the Spring of 2006, there are 25 lenses for the four thirds system in production or announced for production. Those lenses range from 8mm to 1000mm. There is one Fish Eye and 4 dedicated macro lenses. What impressed me about the lenses in this system is that they are designed from the ground up for DSLRs. In fact, it has been argued that the four thirds system has more truly new lenses than any other system (other systems having adapted older designs). But that's a semantic argument.

Do people really believe that is a limiting factor? 25 lenses from FE to supertelephoto won't meet your needs? Are folks concerned about being stuck with only 25 lenses to choose from (today)?
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Old May 29, 2006, 6:14 PM   #8
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I think the issue to date has been the availability of affordable 4/3 lenses. Even in the used maket they are quite expensive and not as readily availble. I don't think anyone has questioned the quality of the lenses, just the cost. Also, there is not as much 3rd party support from sigma, tamron, and others.

I think the bigger issue is the poorerhigh ISO performance because of the smaller sensor the 4/3 system uses.
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Old May 29, 2006, 10:59 PM   #9
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I'm rethinking my choice of the E-500 because of the high noise at larger than ISO 400. I read Ken Rockwell's review of the D50, and I'm seriously reconsidering the Nikon. I've taken some low light pictures at ISO 800 with the D50, and I'm impressed. This will be a difficult choice. I'm very fond of the e-500 LCD for reviewing pics and for changing settings.
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Old May 30, 2006, 3:31 AM   #10
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Gern,
well, it is hard to make decision isn't it? ) but this is part of our enjoyment in this photography hobbies. few additional information on both model D50 & E500:

the good think about E-500 Olympus is its LCD very sparkling to be view and one that you can not get from others is the ability of E-500 to "comparing two shots - SIDE by SIDE" on field right after you finished taken few shots on its LCD.
just press review button ..........lock the first pic then search for the second one, lock then you'll be able to see two shots side by side.
Its very usefull specially to improving our photography skills, sometime when you did these at home at your desk, you probably already forgot how exactly the situation was when those shots had been taken...............well, it only my though......
BUT I found image result from E500 at its AUTO white balance is slightly tends to yellowish side.

D50 NIKON is well priced and very fast from off to taken our first shot, and more pleasant images result comparing to E500 ( both in AUTO )

BUT on my experienced with D50 ( maybe one was unit quality poor, I am not very sure), the way its mirror flap when we take shots from shots is not as good as E500, you probably get a tiny shakes because of its mirror swing energy which produce a tiny vibration when it swing up and down. Well, is anyone have similar experience regarding this mirror vibration of D50? if not, then scrap this info from your check list portfolio.

that is my own experience when that day (about 3 months ago) I actually went to a shop to see and test D50, and if good I would like to have one, but then becoz of these mirror flap vibration I felt, I was re-think and back empty handed from that shop.

another things to be consider : dpreview have news which you probably have to hold your decision because there is another new comer from PENTAX DSLR, K100D - looks to me its quiet potential as comparable to those two models you want to decided D50 and E500
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