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Old Jun 10, 2006, 8:55 AM   #11
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bugatty7373 wrote:
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i thing i will buy a digital rebel (aka 300d) kit and a 50 mm 1.8
This is an older discontinued model. Unless the price difference is significant, you may want to consider the newer Rebel XT instead.

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Old Jun 10, 2006, 11:39 AM   #12
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I too am debating between the Rebek XT and super zooms. Had almost zeroed in on

the fz7 until I saw an article in June Pop Photo which praised the camera but cited their certified tests as :

Certified Test Results:

Noise: High/Unacceptable at ISO 80 (3.05), Moderate at ISO 100 (2.93), High/Unacceptable at ISO 200 (3.45) and ISO 400 (4.5)

Should this be of concern. I don't make large prints.

Thanx




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Old Jun 10, 2006, 12:04 PM   #13
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I'd also take a look at the other entry level DSLR models around.

The price difference between an ultra-zoom and DSLR is getting to be pretty small anymore, and a DSLR has some advantages you don't get with a non-DSLR model (for example, higher usable ISO speeds, larger buffer for more photos in a row, faster AF system with more reliability in low light, faster write speeds to memory cards, loads of lens choices so that you can tailor a camera more to the way you use one, etc.).

Take a look at the Amateur DSLR Category in our Best Cameras List and make sure to read the review Conclusion Section (last page before the sample images in each camera's review).

Personally, I'd be inclined to go with an "all in one" lens solution (Tamron 18-200mm, Sigma 18-200mm, etc.) with an entry level DSLR model, before going with an ultra-zoom choice.

But, for best performance in more conditions, it's better to go with more conservative lens designs. As a general rule, the greater the difference between wide and long, the more compromises a manufacturer makes.

So, lenses with 2x or 3x difference between their widest (least apparent magnification) and longest (most apparent magnification) zoom positions have the best quality within a given price range. Of course, the differences are not as apparent at smaller print and viewing sizes either, and that's especially true if shooting in good light (the differences tend to diminsh some at smaller apertures).

The ultra-zoom models tend to have pretty decent lenses for their focal range, and they are smaller and lighter for any given focal length and brightness. That's because the actual focal length on the lenses can be much shorter compared to lenses on a DSLR (because a DSLR has a much larger sensor).

A non-DSLR will also have more depth of field (more of an image in focus as you get further away from the focus point) for any given aperture and subject framing. That's because Depth of Field is based on actual (versus 35mm equivalent) focal range.

If you want more depth of field, that can be a good thing. If you want to use larger apertures (represented by smaller f/stop numbers) to help your subjects stand out from distracting backgrounds, that can be a bad thing. It's all a matter of perspective, and no one model is perfect for all conditions.

If you want both Anti-Shake and higher ISO Speeds, take a look at the Konica-Minolta Maxxum 5D and 7D models.

Note that I'm biased since I'm currently shooting with a Konica Minolta Maxxum 5D. :-)

There are a couple of vendors that still have KM DSLR models at bargain basement prices now.

For example, Wal-Mart has the Maxxum 7D for only $699 including an 18-70mm lens (giving you a 35mm equivalent focal range of approximately 27-105mm). This DSLR body sold for $100 more than the Canon EOS-20D when it was first introduced, and $600 more than the Nikon D70.

http://www.walmart.com/catalog/produ...uct_id=4898002

Now, you can get them for less than half of that amount while supplies last (and most vendors are sold out). That's a steal for a body with it's build quality and features, and the anti-shake works with any lens you buy for it.

Lenses also become an investment with a DSLR. If you change camera bodies later due to advances in technology, you can usually take your lenses with you within the same brand (and Minolta Autofocus Lenses will work on new Sony DSLR models). With non-DSLR models, the lenses are permanently attached.

Note that Minolta has manufactured over 16 Million Autofocus Lenses that are compatible with the Konica Minolta (and now Sony) DSLR models since 1985. That's not counting third party lenses in this lens mount from Tamron, Sigma, Tokina/Cosina/Phoenix/Vivitar, and even Kodak). The used market is full of lenses in Minolta Autofocus Mount. I bought most of my lenses used.

Sony bought some of Konica Minolta's assets and is providing warranty service for Konica Minolta Digital Cameras and Accessories.


Quote:
Effective April 1, 2006, Sony Electronics will be providing service and repair of certain Konica-Minolta products in the United States. Sony is pleased to provide existing Konica-Minolta customers an excellent customer service experience. All terms and conditions of the Konica-Minolta products' limited warranty continue to apply.
Sony Support for Konica Minolta Cameras, Lenses and Accessories

BTW, Sony just introduced a new model that can use the same lenses. Sony and Konica Minolta have been working on developing DSLR models for Sony since July 2005. Steve has a First Look Preveiw here:

http://www.steves-digicams.com/2006_.../alpha100.html

Sonystyle.com is reporting that it should be shipping on or before July 28th.

Sony Alpha 100 DSLR Body at Sonystyle.com

Sony Alpha 100 DSLR Kit including 18-70mm Lens at Sonystyle.com

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Old Jun 13, 2006, 1:39 PM   #14
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yes, that's my concern about fz7: the noise. I tested it today, I liked it: quick focus, small, good macro. but what should I do about the noise ?

I have a posibility to buy a FZ7 on the 1 st of July or a Rebel XT (i've considered it) with the kit lens on the 1st of september.
I thought I could buy a FZ7 because I learned too many thing about fotography in the past months and I don't know if I can take anymore working with my current Olympus C310 .
What should I do ?
THX
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Old Jun 13, 2006, 3:06 PM   #15
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bugatty7373 wrote:
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I thought I could buy a FZ7 because I learned too many thing about fotography in the past months and I don't know if I can take anymore working with my current Olympus C310 .
What should I do ?
THX
Where are you seeing limitations with your existing camera?

It sounds like you have money burning a hole in your pocket. But, you don't want to "jump out of the frying pan into the fire"

Based on what I see in this thread so far, it sounds like you want something with more optical zoom. But, you don't want any noise.

Well, any camera is going to have some amount of noise as ISO speeds are increased (or smoothing of detail from noise reduction).

Judging by the specs for your Olympus, it's Auto ISO range goes up to ISO 400. Most non-DSLR models won't have an Auto ISO range that goes that high (although you can set most of them higher). So, even if you like the noise levels from a model you look at, you may still have shutter speeds that are too slow to help out with motion blur or blur from camera shake in some lighting conditions if the ISO speeds are not high enough.

Lens brightness also comes into the equation.

As a general rule, a DSLR model will have better Autofocus, Buffer Size (number of photos in a row before the internal memory fills up and the speed of operation slows down), write speed to memory cards, Autofocus Speed/Reliability, and more.

But, lenses will be more expensive for the same focal range and brightness. For example, a 70-200mm f/2.8 zoom will typically run around $800 on the budget end (and more for a manufacturer's lens that's this bright). An equivalent lens will also be larger and heavier for the same focal range and brightness using a DSLR (because the sensors are much larger in most DSLR models).

You will also have more depth of field using a non-DSLR model for any given framing and aperture. That's because the actual focal length of the lenses is much shorter for a non-DSLR model using a tiny sensor.

There are Pros and Cons to both camera types.

I'd think about where you have limitations with your existing camera before deciding.... Then, make sure that you're looking at a complete solution to handle those limitations (body and lenses if going with a DSLR Solution), and making sure the lens focal length, brightness, available ISO speeds and noise levels is acceptable if going with a non-DSLR solution.

BTW. Fuji just announced a price drop on one of the non-DSLR models in your list that has higher available ISO speeds compared to most non-DSLR models:

http://www.steves-digicams.com/diginews.html#fuji_s5200


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