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Old Jul 8, 2006, 9:35 AM   #21
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Not using a flash with less than ideal light with moving subjects will cause blur with a p&s, not sure with a dSLR since I haven't figured which to buy yet.
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Old Jul 8, 2006, 10:27 AM   #22
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It all has to do with:

(1) The actual measured level of light

(2) The ability of your camera ability to shoot at low light levels (the ISO system)

(3) The actual shutter speed that your camer employs when taking the photo.

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Old Jul 8, 2006, 7:41 PM   #23
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pagerboy wrote:
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Not using a flash with less than ideal light with moving subjects will cause blur with a p&s, not sure with a dSLR since I haven't figure which to buy yet.
If aperture, shutter, and ISO are all the same in the exact situation, the results would be the same. The difference is primarily that you are more likely to shake a small P&S than a dSLR. Aditionally, the dSLR generally has more acceptable performance at high ISO.

After reading the review you posted on the F30, I am somewhat disappointed. It is a great camera, yes, but there are very few improvements over the F10. And the F10 can be found over $100 cheaper. The BIGGEST difference is shutter and aperture priority. Th noise at each ISO is almost the same as the F10. ISO400 is almost as good as 100 in the F10 as with the F30, and 1600 looks very similar in both. The difference here is the much noisier 3200 available. Granted the F30s 3200 is less noisy than most P&S camera's 800, it is much noisier than the F10s 1600. The natural then flash mode looks usefull, and I really would like the priority settings, but this camera does not make me want to run out and trade in my F10. It is just as fast for focusing, startup, shot to shot, shutter lag, etc.

Back to dSLR vs compact, they each have their own advantages and drawbacks. My cousin has a Nikon d50, and we often go shooting together. I will compare the D50 and F30 based on my experience with the F10 and D50.

The F30's major advantages over the D50 is it's size and price. The D50 will cost you about $600 with a basic lens, while the F30 costs about $350, and sports a similarily speced lens. However, the F30 has a faster aperture at wide angle and s lower one at full zoom compared to the D50. The D50 will have more wide angle, the F30, more zoom. Both have a small amount of chronomatic abrasion. They are both good lenses, neither great. However, you can get better lenses for the D50, though they will be costly, at least you have the capability.

The F30 will come close to the D50 in terms of ISO performance.The D50 is actually cleaner at every ISO stop, and cleaner at 200 than the F10/30 is at 100. However, they are fairly similar at 1600, the Nikon still a little better with less detail loss. Suprizingly, the F10/30 actually captures more detail in optimal situations than the D50 acccording to resolution tests, though the Nikon can only go down to ISO200.

Another advantage of a compact is it's great depth of field at the same aperture, esspecially important if photographing kids, where they are often not each at the same distance in a shot. The Nikon has a more powerful flash and less of a tendency to red eye.

The Nikon will give you many more options and way to customize your photos and shooting experience, but the menus will be more complex and confusing than the F10/30.

The F10/30 has micro always available while the Nikon requires a special lens.

As you can see, there are many advantages and disadvantage. Overall, image quality goes to the dSLR, but there are situations where a compact like the F10/30s have advantages. The ability to have a versitile camera in your pocket at all times is indespencable, but the quality of a good dSLR is hard to argue with. The best choice is both if you can afford it
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Old Jul 8, 2006, 11:21 PM   #24
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Carskick wrote:
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The F30's major advantages over the D50 is it's size and price. The D50 will cost you about $600 with a basic lens, while the F30 costs about $350, and sports a similarily speced lens.
The F30 can be had for for as low as 314 minus a 50 rebate right. 264 is a great deal on this point and shoot. I believe the rebate ends July 15th.


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Old Jul 9, 2006, 12:39 PM   #25
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I own, use,and like my Fuji F-30. It is a very nice companion to my D-50. However, it will not beat my D-50 ever under the same circumstances when zoomed out to its max 3X optical zoom, because the aperture on the F-30 falls to F 5.0 when zoomed out fully.

Yes, the F-30 is impressive, but it has some limitations that you average consumer DSLR does not have do deal with everyday.

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