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Old Jul 11, 2006, 12:41 AM   #51
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Bernabeu-

True to the age old adage, "...a picture is worth a thousand words..." you have, ever so eloquently, put forward a very strong pictorial and word platform stating exactly how you feel about what makes an image powerful.

Certainly your list of lenses and the very powerfulposted photos are a powerful alocade of the long Minolta heritage. It was a sad time to see the Minolta name past into history, rather than remaining an everyday working reality in the photographic world.

One can not help but ponder if Sony will continue to produce the thoroughbred kind ofequipment and lenses that were an essentialpart of that powerful Minolta heritage.

Hopefully others will join our further discussion of photography as art. Thanks for expressing your message in such powerful terms/photos.

MT
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Old Jul 11, 2006, 6:58 AM   #52
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bernabeu wrote:
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mtclimber,

My point is that if you wish to take snapshots and/or general recording photos then a 10x zoom on a P&S camera is ideal. The sensor is good enough for a 10x zoom.

However, if you select a dSLR with it's large(r) sensorfor image quality and/or low light work why compromise the choice with inferior glass?

No, repeat no, P&S comes close to a dSLR with a good prime for image quality.

It is possible to make an excellent quality 3x zoom at a reasonable price, it is NOT possible to make a 10x zoom of decent quality with an APS-C image circle for under $10,000.

Perhaps, today, most of the people stepping up to a dSLR are accustomed to second rate image quality and are satisfied with the compromised quality of a 10x zoom for $250-300.

IMO: there was no point (except shutter lag) to 'step up' w/o buying good glass.

There are P&S cameras with good glass (eg. fuji s7000):
You posted some great shots and fine examples of photography as an art. You make some great points and I happen to agree with a lot of what you are saying. Where we mostly I differis that I feel there are times when it's OKto compromise with inferior glass. When I'm traveling with my wife and kids, I have to make the best of the situation.Like many I'm takingshots of funs things in places like amusement parks, zoos, nature, etc. At times it is not convenient to carry a lot of lenses or it is not practicalto change lenses. Equipping a DSLR with a greater than 3X lens may weaken compromise the capabilities of the camera, but it is still better than any point and shoot camera I have seen. Of course there are times when it may not be practical to carry anything but a pocket camera. That is a compromise also... does that mean I shouldn't take pictures because a pocket camera compromises the quality of photography?... Of course not.

Sure photography is an art, but not everyone is at your level. Mastering photography is an evolutionary process. Some just want to take pictures and have fun. Some want to take pictures as good as yours, but it doesn't happen overnight. Some can't afford good glass, but until they can, they make do with what they have. Most of my lenses are actually pretty decent and I have many of the ones you mention, but I also have in my collection a Tamron 28-300mm which many here have gotten good results with. It's not the brightest or best lens out there, but it does a decent job as long as you don't use it wide open otherwise you end up with soft shots. Do I use it indoors in low light?... hell no; in fact I hate using it indoors especially at home where28mm is not wide enough and 300mm is overkill.
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Old Jul 11, 2006, 7:02 AM   #53
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bernabeu wrote:
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IMO:

a camera/lens combination must be capable of capturing enough data/details/sharpness to enable a photographic quality print of 11x14" as a MINIMUM, with luck you can get acceptable 20x30"

this can be accomplished in spite of most megapixel limitations by using software to interpolate the file size upwards, BUT, the detail needs to have been captured by a top quality lens

How do I interpolate the file size upwards? I use Paint Shop Pro and have resized images in steps of 10%. Am I losing something by doing it that way or is it the same or similar to what you describe?


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Old Jul 11, 2006, 8:02 AM   #54
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meanstreak,

you are doing it correctly



gozinta,

when you get 'the shot of a lifetime' on vacation i hope youare using a good lens so that you can actually print it razor sharp (software sharpening is great for the screen)



mtclimber,

my comments are not brand dependant, canon /nikon/pentax (and others) all make good glass

my main point is: get the best glass you can even if you must give up the 'convenience' of mega zooms

'small' zooms are cheaper AND BETTER



LET"S STOP TALKING AND GO SHOOTING

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Old Jul 11, 2006, 10:36 AM   #55
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bernabeu-

You are thinking along the same lines that I am! The especially great photo, often referred to as "the photo of a life time" is worth capturing with a good camera and good glass. To that end, I contantly carry in my camera bag/purse (yes, a lot of folks on this forum don't realize I am a woman) both a DSLR and a P&S pocket camera/companion camera (currently it is a Fuji F-30).

I happen to believe that great photos turn up when you are least expecting them. Thus, because I always have at least twocameras with me, I have been able to take some very memorable photos.

However, I personally believe that not only do circumstancescome into play, but also the artist's eye (in this case, the photographer's eye) who sees the exact angle or the necessary light that really expresses the moment. Again, this is just my own belief, but I work every single day to see that great photo, to explore the play of light, and to properly record it. You obviously have done that with your photos. That is what makes your photos so powerful. Thanks for some further inspiration.

MT


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Old Jul 11, 2006, 10:44 AM   #56
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thank YOU for the wonderful compliment

a scanned film shot from long ago

minolta x-700 with MC 50mm f1.4:


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Old Jul 11, 2006, 12:50 PM   #57
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bernabeu wrote:
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meanstreak,

you are doing it correctly



Is there an optimum percentage to increase it by in steps or does it really matter?
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Old Jul 11, 2006, 4:40 PM   #58
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i'm not that knowledgeable

i final crop most of my work to 8x10 @ 300ppi using bicubic resample

this lets me make marketable 8x10 prints at homeand some enlargements onto canvas up to 16x20 from mpix.com

? jimc ? any tips ? !
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Old Jul 11, 2006, 8:57 PM   #59
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Bernabeu-

Here is a surprise for you. I was shopping this morning about noon under overcast skies, and using my Fuji F-30 Pocket Camera I snapped this photo. At best this has to be classified as "average glass." But the result does not look too bad.

MT
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Old Jul 11, 2006, 9:56 PM   #60
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mtclimber wrote:
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Bernabeu-

Here is a surprise for you. I was shopping this morning about noon under overcast skies, and using my Fuji F-30 Pocket Camera I snapped this photo. At best this has to be classified as "average glass." But the result does not look too bad.

MT

That's pretty darn good! DSLR like quality. I've DSLR shots not as good, but I guess that was the fault of the photographer.
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