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Old Jul 21, 2006, 6:58 PM   #1
KcR
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So basically, I'm looking for something a little more sophisticated than the basic p&s I have now. I've pretty much exhausted myself reading all these threads, and cannot make a decision as to what direction I should head. I plan on taking mostly landscape/architecture shots, with some macro here and there. Not too much action photography, although I wouldn't mind something that could handle a sporting event once in a while. This leads me to believe I should look at a wide-angle camera over super zoom, but I would also like something that I can carry around with some ease. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

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Old Jul 21, 2006, 8:14 PM   #2
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kcr-

Well, the basic decision will be to stay with a Point and Shoot or to move to a DSLR and to have the flexibility of changing lenses as the shooting situation changes. In the P&S category you could go with the very highly rated Canon A-620 which supports a wide angle auxillary lens. In the DSLR Department, you can take a look at the Pentax DL which comes equipped with an 18-55mm lens as the kit lens, which would cover your wide angle requirements instantly. There is also a $100 rebate on the Pentax DL currently, which makes the Pentax DL an attractive choice.

For example the attached photo was taken using a KM 5D camera with a Sigma 18-200mm zoom lens at 18mm, its wide angle position.

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Old Jul 21, 2006, 9:32 PM   #3
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MT,

Thanks for the fast reply. Just got back from circuit city to check some cameras out. The Pentax DL was very nice, and I actually felt somewhat overwhelmed when playing around with it. I have a basic understanding of photography, but I'm afraid that the Pentax might be a little too advanced. Still, at that price it's very hard to pass up. Would you say that the learning curve moving from a 5 year old P&S would be a steep one? Thanks again,

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Old Jul 21, 2006, 10:19 PM   #4
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you may want to consider 2 other cameras:

the Kodak P880 isa pro-sumer. it has a 24mm manual wide zoom lens (just twist to zoom--no more buttons)and 8 megapixels for detail. thetechnical review below says that it has one of the best scores for color accuracy around--even higher then dSLRs.Being a Kodak, it is also user friendly....

besides the P880,a lot of real estate agents are using the Kodak V570. it is a pocket camera that has a super wide 23 mm zoom lens, and does in camera stitching of three photos for a 180 degree wide panoramic. no computer is needed to make the panoramic.

here are some examples...first the V570--note the wide shots and panoramics--click on them for a larger view...

http://www.beeskneesimaging.com/recently.html

P880 review:

http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/P880/P880A.HTM

good luck and look forward to any postings...

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Old Jul 21, 2006, 11:46 PM   #5
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Well, KcR-

KCM has given you another view point and more possible cameras to explore. The portfolio of photos are very impressive. Here is how I see it, and I have been a Digital Camera Instructor for our State University and our local Community College more than a few years, so I have seen many folks progress with their photography growthover the years.

Curently, with DSLR cameras at all time low prices and indeed, very near the price of the ultra-zoom and upper level point and shoot cameras, perhaps it is prudent to short cut that normal progression through a series of better and better P&S cameras. Just buy the DSLR camera, which has always been the eventualdestination of that progression cycle, straight away. It would be a money saving strategy.

Can folks who are P&S'ers make the jump to a DSLR camera such as the Pentax DL, the Nikon D-50, the KM 5D, the Olympus E-500, or the Canon XT? Well they are doing it with regularity and learning a great deal about photography in the process, as they make that transition. Yes, there is a learning curve. However, all the consumer DSLR cameras come with an auto mode and scene modes.

The decision is yours to make. Think about it. Just know that many have done the transition, or are in the process of doing so.

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Old Jul 21, 2006, 11:46 PM   #6
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I apologize! I got a duplicate post.

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Old Jul 22, 2006, 7:34 AM   #7
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I would add that, with alittle time, and reading a beginner's photography book or two (or taking an intro class of some type) will make the process much easier. The learning curve is also much more accelerated with digital SLRs than it was with film - for the simple reason that you have instant feedback.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"our first digital p&s was a sony CD-250 (one of the ones that recorded to mini CDs) had that for a couple of years. decided to get something new, thought i would try to learn and get into photography. I chose the panasonic fz30, figuring it would be a good learning camera. it certainly was! but, after 8 months i'd already felt like it was limiting in many situations, especially indoors and low light shooting (which will be a problem with and p&s). luckily, the pentax, with the $100 rebate came along. i sold my fz30 on ebay, which more than funded the purchase of the pentax! now that is a good deal in my book anyday!

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"in short, i agree that you should make the jump if you feel like you want to learn - and in the meantime there is always the auto modes!
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Old Jul 22, 2006, 8:25 AM   #8
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milrodpxpx-

Thanks for your post. The message ofyour post encapsulates the exact problem facing many point and shoot photographers who want to make the switch to a DSLR camera. Most local Community Colleges today are at least offering and Introduction to Digital Cameras or a Beginning Single Lens Reflex Camera Workshop (I am currently teaching both of those classes)which give the P&S'er an excellent pathway to make an easier transition from P&S to DSLR.

There will be a learning curve. But taking a regularly scheduled class once or twice a week over a five or ten week period, where you can shoot lots of photos on your own between classes to re-inforce that learning, really eases the squeeze of the learning curve.

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Old Jul 22, 2006, 2:25 PM   #9
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Thanks everyone for the responses, much appreciated. I'm heading to Aruba in 2 weeks so hopefully I can be decisive.

Much appreciated,

KR
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Old Jul 23, 2006, 1:00 PM   #10
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KcR-

Tell us what you found on your camera shopping expedition yesterday (07/22)?

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