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Old Jul 31, 2006, 7:58 AM   #1
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Alright, I didn't planned to get all of them and my main intention is not to select the best one out there and then Chao. However, I am more curious to know how each and every one compares to each other in terms of performance, feature set, and or quality etc...

I am also interested to know which one out of the list will you pick and why? (Can be subjective!). Which one of them will be the ultimate photographer's choice? (Which one of them is the one the photographer will most likely pick?).

Sony Alpha A100: Anti-shake feature and CCD dust shake + anti-static coating, 230,000 pixel clear photo LCD plus, white balance temperature setting, extensive white balance fine tune, some interesting dynamic range optimizer with (low key - high key ISO etc.), eye start AF, pentaprism viewfinder, nice rear design, two mode dials, continuous shooting at 3fps until memory card is full! But no mirror lock up feature to be found yet??? (I couldn't locate it) >>> Found it! It has that feature.

Olympus EVOLT E-500: Supersonic wave dust filter that is more effective than the CCD dust shake of the A100 I think, more extensive range of white balance temperature settings + Kelvin, wider range of white balance fine tunings, JPEG compression settings, widest among allin photo resolution selections, some advance metering mode that includes low key - high key settings, incremented ISO range (Many selections between lowest and highest), extensive in camera image editing facility, 4 channel histogram, manual flash settings, flash bracketing's, TIFF format, B&W mode with selectablefilters, extensive image perimeter settings, pentaprism viewfinder with multi coating, wide angle Hyper Crystal TFT LCD with 215,250 pixels,nice looking design with neat controls,and up to 60 seconds long exposure slow shutter (8 Min's bulb). Forgot to mentioned that it also has selectable noise reduction modes.

Nikon D70s: Fully usable ISO rangeto max ISO 1600, film grain (monochrome) noise characteristics, very robust/comfortable design, viewfinder grid-lines, max 1/8000 secs fast shutter, dual command dials, white balance fine tunings, TTL white-balance with 1,005-pixel RGB sensor, 3D Color Matrix Metering with 1,005-pixel RGB sensor, center-weighted metering with Weight of 75% (8mm circle) given to 6, 8, 10, or 12 -mm dia. circle in center of frame, or weighting based on average of entire frame, spot meteringthatMeters 2.3mm dia. circle (about 1% of frame) centered on active focus area (Selectable spot metering radius), flash synchronization at up to 1/500 sec, advance flash controls, complete Flash Sync Mode, crisp and per-pixel sharp image quality, very natural looking images, continuous shooting until memory card is full,AF assist LED, and more extensive image perimeter settings.I forgot to mentioned that it has ISO increments as well (Just as the EVOLT E-500 dSLR has it).


Nikon D50: Generally quite similar to the D70s in almost every way. However, it has cut down features, better dynamic range, and less noises in it's images. I heard that the build quality is also slightly lower and the images slightly softer looking. The camera has also been tuned to produce more saturated images and doesn't monitor the metering so precisely anymore to avoid overexposures (Cut down metering segments).

Canon EOS-350D: Best image quality of the range? (Not surebecause of theD70s), great dynamic range (Second only to the D50), low noise high ISO performance (Second to D50 but ISO rangeis understated, so the EOS 350D has more sensitivity: ISO 1600 = ISO 2000), B & W mode withfilters, white balance fine tune, dept of field picture mode, and a nice looking design.

Samsung GX-1S: (Best TTL viewfinder); Eye-level type fixed penta-prism viewfinder, natural bright-matte focusing screen, magnification approx. x0.95, 95% frame coverage, dioptric adjustment (-2.5 to +1.5), complete viewfinder info bar including ISOsensitivity warning, 11-area AF, TTL Phase matching AF system, focus point selectable, EV 0 to 19 (ISO 100) detection range, 2.5" TFT LCD with 210,000 pixels,and nice looking design.

Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-R1 pro sumer: Best quality F2.8 C.Z. T* fully coated optics with 24 mm wide angle to 5x optical mechanical zoom + manual focus ring, live preview10.8 mega-pixels CMOS imagery, sharp LCD can be used for live viewing, high resolution 235,200 pixels EVF with proximity sensor, quiet shutter release, WB Fine-Tune,flash x-sync up to maximum shutter speed (1/2000 sec), AF Illumination lamp, movable spot focus, bulb mode with time, AGCS, varie angle LCD, magnified manual focus feature, zebra pattern display (for highlights), 4 channel histogram, and on LCD grid lines.

All of them have their great prominent points. However, I didn't state the bad points.

If you have to choose, which one would you pick and why?



EDIT: D50 has best dynamic range (Of the lot) and "most detailed" clean images at the max ISO (1600). Not kidding. (But the wholeEOS 350D's ISO range was understated). Nevertheless, the D50 winsthem allon each highest ISO (1600) setting.

Also added Olympus E-500 has selectable noise reduction filters, continuous shooting in JPEGs until memory card fills up, manual focus bracketing, test picture, customizable buttons and dial, custom mirror-lockup, & lens shading correction.

Finally, the Sony Alpha A100 has mirror lock up.






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Old Jul 31, 2006, 12:08 PM   #2
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If you don't mind adding in a comparison of the Pentax K100D as well. It is new and in the same ballpark price range as the others you listed. I'm currently looking to get my family to invest in a dSLR and am looking primarily at the XT, D50, and K100D. But, a good comparison of features would be very beneficial to my search.

It would also be interesting to know what the higher end camera's have over the into level dSLR's, feature wise...

I will be following this thread! Hope it gets some attention (to details)...
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Old Jul 31, 2006, 12:36 PM   #3
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This is just way to broad of a question. Likely, you'll get lots of answers from people who are partial to the brand they use which is not quite objective and will probably not be much of a help in your decisionmaking. All the cameras have plusses and minuses, and all will do a fabulous job if used correctly. What's more important is your understanding of photography and how to achieve the results you desire. All these DSLR will perform well when when used competently.

Your best bet is to handle each camera and understand what your budget is, what features you desire and what kinds of shots you will be taking. You've already done enough research as you are aware of many of the features present in each camera. Pick the one that feels the best and has the features you need.
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Old Jul 31, 2006, 1:23 PM   #4
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I realize this post is a little broad...but, there are a lot of little details that could be expanded upon by users who are "in the know"

For example:

ISO performances...personally, I don't feel the A100 at ISO1600 is acceptable, consider my little F30 is nearly as good.

Autofocus performance...How often do they hit/miss. Under what conditions...What are the focusing speeds under good lighting, bad lighting.

Viewfinder size/brightness. I found the OlympusE330 severely lacking in comparison to the Canon20D. How do the listed camera's compare to these two?

Image quality "out of the box". What are the differences? Because, not everyone wants to PP every image!

These are kind of little details that will help users make decisions.

Maybe input as simple as - why did you choosethe camera you did -would be helpful to us.

I don't know about Ben, but I don't have a whole lot of experience with SLR's, so I'm not sure what potential features exist between the different models...for example, I knew nothing about TTL, P-TTL flash until yesterday!


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Old Jul 31, 2006, 6:35 PM   #5
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There are very few users who have used all the cameras that are mentioned, and are thus qualified tomake statements that can be of serious value. And even then, most of those statements would just be opinion. Perhaps the best source of this info is available right on this site in the review section. Steve mentions Af speed, low light performance, etc.

For me, Nikon cameras just feel better and are easy for me to use. I'm confident I could get similiar results from just about any DSLR out there, ( with practice of course). Nearly all DSLR images improve with photoshop, and since I mostly shoot raw, all my images require post work. The only cameras I wouldn't seriously consider if I was just getting into the DSLR market are the 4/3 cameras. The lack of inexpensive glass and 3rd party support, as well as poorer high iso performance due to the smaller sensor, put them low on my list (although if you're just looking for a kit without regards to future upgrades, the olympus kit lenses are probably the best of the bunch). I wouldn't consider Sony, simply because I'm not interested in changing systems, which I've done once (I switched from Minolta because they were late into the DSLR market).

I don't mean to sound flippant, but for the information you seek, the various DSLR review sites (dpreview, and this site) are really the best sources of info.
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Old Jul 31, 2006, 7:45 PM   #6
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rjseeney wrote:
Quote:
I don't mean to sound flippant, but for the information you seek, the various DSLR review sites (dpreview, and this site) are really the best sources of info.
Nah, the info you've provided is more than fair. Opinions are very helpful, because it gives us an idea of why people choose certain camera's. Without that sort of input, all I have to go off of is fact sheets and camera specs. And the professional website reviews don'tcover everything...

Thank you.
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Old Aug 1, 2006, 6:30 AM   #7
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I would say your best bet is to read as many reviews as possible for a camera and then try and merge them into one (if that makes any sense). See what the reviewers are saying about the camera and then look for common themes.

To be honest, and not to poo poo anyone here I would be very wary about reading some of the comments people leave here and especially on DPreview, some people bring a lot of prejudice against certain systems, fan boys of others. Just look at some of the nonsense some of the old KM fanboys are spouting about the Alpha - probably a lot of it because it's called a SONY and not a KM - although I think a few would try and deny it :?

I've used a Nikon D50, Canon 350D and Sony A-100 (which I now own). I am new to the DSLR market so didn't have any "old luggage" to carry with me into it, people always like giving opinions on what to use - but without the baggage you can choose what you like within your budget - I felt the Sony at £599 with Kit Lens offered me everything I wanted, with the added bonus of having a lot of previous Minolta lens' available at an attractive price (I felt the Nikon and Canon were very expensive in this area) plus some new Sony ones.

Whatever you do buy - I'm sure you will have a lot of fun with it - I've just got mine and already my "old" model is posing for me - just look at the Post Your Family pictures :-)
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Old Aug 1, 2006, 6:59 AM   #8
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Thanks guys for your inputs. :-) (Sure, you can bring other similer range cameras for comparisons in here.)

I am leaning to wards the Olympus EVOLT E-500 (What a weird name!). :G

The reason why I am leaning to wards the Olympus EVOLT E-500 is because it offers me a full suit of features (As you can see above). BTW, how important is mirror lock up vibration reduction? The Nikon D70s and D50 doesn't have it. (BTW, I foundthe Sony A100 dSLR has it after all).

I am planning to be a "Professional" photographer in future and I certainly plan to take photography asa profession. I will be attending photographic courses in future BTW, and as soon as I leave high school; I will be entering into collegeto take up thephotography courses offered there.

I am going to be photographic student (In the near future) and I need a "Flexible" camera (Especially a dSLR) to start at once. In future, I believe I will have to be meeting the demands of the various companies etc... and I shall most likely be handling dSLR cameras. (I better start with a dSLR now to getused it.). I believe that working photographers must be efficient and used to complex adjustments, settings, and functions etc...(I might need to encounter those later on).

In summary, I think the more functions & controls in my next camera (Preferably a dSLR) thebetter it will be for the long run (As I will learn to tweak around etc.). I want to prepare myself for the future. (And be an efficient well seasoned photographer!)

As a question, what do you guys think about the Olympus EVOLT E-500 for my long term? My next camera (dSLR) is going to be with me for a long time, so it better be the right choice! :lol:What is your opinion of it?



EDIT: It seems to me that OLYMPUS is moving towards the live previewsidein their dSLRs (That technology would surely mature morein the future)...will the EVOLT E-500 model be the first and lastof its kind with (TTL pentaprism design) from Olympus (Then the rest with live previews from now on)? Look at the latestE-330.

As an aside;

The live preview in dSLRs is still in it's infancy and it will surely get more developed and well established in the future. Currently, it is still a new R&D and cost will behigh. However, as the technology moves on, it will eventually get cheaper and more wide spread.


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Old Aug 1, 2006, 7:45 AM   #9
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Until live preview is "what you see is what you get", I don't find it of any use. As has been said, any DSLR can be used to achieve professional results. Not to knock Olympus, but most pro's are shooting either Canon or Nikon. They have a wider variety of glass and accessories available, and lots of 3rd party support. You can also easily find used equipment which can significantly reduce your investment. They also have a clear upgrade path, with bodies residing at many 'levels", ie consumer, prosumer, and pro. Olympus does not currently have a top end, or even upper middle level body. That's not to say they won't in the future, or that you can't achieve professional results with Oly DSLR's. I just think if your planning on being a pro, Canon and Nikon offer a clearer path in equipment that's available for a pro.

Mirror lockup is useful in situations using a tripod and slow shutter speeds. When the mirror slaps up, it slightly shakes the camera, even on a tripod. Locking the mirror up prevents this vibration from the mirro happening. If you do alot of long exposures, mirror vibration is a big help. The typical, casual shooter will rarely use it. Also if you mostly handhold, there is no sense in even using mirror lockup as handshake will exceed any advantage gieven by mirror lockup.

I see you've changed your mind....earlier you seemed to have settled on Nikon or Canon. Don't get caught in paralysis by over analysis. Its easy to get hung up on fine details, and think of all the shots you'll miss. Again, you can't go wrong with any of the current DSLR's.
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Old Aug 1, 2006, 7:49 AM   #10
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The E-500's dust-reduction system is a great feature for a first-time DSLR user. Less time spent poking around the sensor. The E-500 (to me) has a good "feel". My only regrets (and the reason I settled on an E-1 instead) were 1) the viewfinder, which I considered to be a bit tiny for my tastes (feel like my eye had to search around it). The shooting info is at the right side in the viewfinder; I prefer it at the bottom, 2) no PC contact for external flash; only the hot shoe (I use studio strobes & the PC contact is nice to have) and 3) no accessory power grip (a minor issue to some, but I shoot long sessions so I need it).

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"Let me say that none of the above is a reason not to buy; they're very subjective (but look for yourself). On the plus side you have great scene modes, a large, bright LCD screen (I don't think live-view in an SLR is a big deal unless you need to make odd-angle shots or use an underwater housing) and of course that dust reduction.

No camera is without it's own unique strengths and weaknesses. There were many criticisms of the E-1 but it was the camera to suit MY needs. Perhaps the E-500 will suit yours.
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