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Old Jun 18, 2019, 11:05 AM   #1
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Default 17 year cicadas

Or "locusts" as we call them. They're gross, but they're also very slow and stupid and give me time to actually focus.


untitled-33.jpg by sammykhalifa, on Flickr

Last edited by SammyKhalifa; Jun 18, 2019 at 11:08 AM.
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Old Jun 18, 2019, 5:41 PM   #2
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G'day Sammy

Very definitely a cicada and nothin' like a locust > which to us Aussies is similar to an over-sized grasshopper [maybe 2-1/2" to 3" long]

Dunno how you come to the age of this fella above - maybe it's the smile - however it's a great closeup of the face ... well done

Phil
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Old Jun 19, 2019, 7:33 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ozzie_Traveller View Post
G'day Sammy

Very definitely a cicada and nothin' like a locust > which to us Aussies is similar to an over-sized grasshopper [maybe 2-1/2" to 3" long]

Dunno how you come to the age of this fella above - maybe it's the smile - however it's a great closeup of the face ... well done

Phil
Hi Phil,
Thanks for the compliment.

Yes, I know it's definitely a cicada--"locust" is just a colloquial thing based on how this variety arrives. Back at the beginning of the month, he along with millions of his relatives all came up from the ground and shed their skins. All at the same time. They'll be here for another few weeks, by the millions (billions?) making the trees buzz constantly. They'll mate, lay some eggs, and then die falling all over the ground in thick carpets in some places. Their survival mechanism is that there are so many at once that predators couldn't possibly eat them all (they certainly don't know how to avoid dangers such as birds or car windshields).

Their eggs will hatch, and larvae burrow underground laying dormant; and we won't see any again in my local region until 2036.
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