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Old Apr 29, 2007, 6:43 PM   #1
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I took my first shots at hummingbirds at the feeder on my front porch this morning. I would welcome any tips on setup to get these little speedsters. I was obviously too close to the feeder with my first set of my tripod as I got buzzed by two of them trying to chase me away....one of them actually bumping into my head.

I think I need to move my feeder into the sun to get good shots. I shot on shutter priority at 1/2000, but to get enough light I had to go to ISO 1600, with attendant noise. I used Neat Image for noise reduction, but moving the settings up enough to get all the noise out costs too much in loss of detail.

Any help appreciated.
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Old Apr 29, 2007, 6:44 PM   #2
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Old Apr 29, 2007, 8:54 PM   #3
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I had the same problem last summer using an Olympus C770. I used the flash and the pictures came out very well. Now that I have a DSLR, I would try manual mode and set the exposure in a shaded area. Try a slower shutter speed. The wingbeats are not much more than 75 beats per second.

Rick
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Old Apr 29, 2007, 9:20 PM   #4
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With the pushing, 1 turned out to be something like a Chinese impressionistic painting. The effect is interesting. The image is also motion-packed.
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Old Apr 29, 2007, 9:48 PM   #5
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Here is my set up:


  • If your feeder has more than 1 opening tape them off (leaving only 1)[/*]
  • Setup tripod for a present background & sun (move if you have to)[/*]
  • Use right or left focus point on edge of feeder (not center)[/*]
  • Use aperture priority mode f5.6 or lower (shallow DOF)[/*]
  • ISO to get at least 1/500[suP]th[/suP] shutter speed[/*]
  • Take the shot after hummer backs off the feeder into your center focus point
[/*]


Good luck

Timing is everything
Jeff
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Old Apr 30, 2007, 1:59 PM   #6
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Good advice jeff... similar to my approach... also, get away from taking shots that include the feeder, set up a perch or flowers near the feeders and get them on a more natural looking subject. Here's what I've been able to get.







http://www.pbase.com/mike_lentz
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Old May 1, 2007, 2:01 PM   #7
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Dang!! You guys are good!! Thanks for the tips - I'll try them out when the little guys move up here in another few weeks. Cheers, Dan
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