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Old Jul 2, 2007, 4:34 PM   #1
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Old Jul 3, 2007, 9:52 AM   #2
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Fantastic!
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Old Jul 3, 2007, 12:34 PM   #3
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This is asuperb capture of a magnificent display.Was there a female nearby that he wasshowing off to? Do you know which hummingbird this is? There is one I found thatcould bethis one- the White-naped Jacobin (Florisuga mellifera), but I am not sureif it occurs where you are (or is this an aviary bird?). John Gould, the famous 19th C bird illustrator (especially noted for his hummingbirds), complained that he was unable to properlyportray this species in all its splendor. You did better.

Well done!
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Old Jul 3, 2007, 7:57 PM   #4
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Fantastic series, few photos can make these creatures look BETTER than real life, but you've done it. Just wonderful captures
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Old Jul 3, 2007, 8:01 PM   #5
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Very nice it looks like they all need a frame.


TOTALLY WACKY roger
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Old Jul 4, 2007, 3:29 PM   #6
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penolta wrote:
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This is asuperb capture of a magnificent display.Was there a female nearby that he wasshowing off to? Do you know which hummingbird this is? ...
No female! :-)

-> If you notice there's was a slight drizzle and I was lucky enough to catch them while they were shaking the rain off

What I like best about the last shot is that I was able to capture the wings in 4 different positions - A higher shutter speed would have froze the whole thing in mid-air which migth not be as nice... IMO
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Old Jul 4, 2007, 6:44 PM   #7
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No female! :-)

-> If you notice there's was a slight drizzle and I was lucky enough to catch them while they were shaking the rain off
So it wasn't a courtship display -- he was just bathing in the rain. Probably uses the same motor patterns, though.

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What I like best about the last shot is that I was able to capture the wings in 4 different positions - A higher shutter speed would have froze the whole thing in mid-air which migth not be as nice... IMO
And educational, too. It shows the wingfeathers pointing in opposite directions above and below the body, which illustrates how hummingbirds fly. They (and swifts) are unique in holding the wings rigid and rotating the wing 180 degrees at the shoulder so they can generate lift on both upstroke and downstroke. "Normal" birds can bend the wrists and elbows in flight and generate most of their lift on the downstroke only; they cannot hover helicopter-like with the body held vertically as hummingbirds do (and swifts descend vertically into hollow trees and chimneys). Seeing both positions in one photograph is more illustrative than two separate ones or one witha continuous blur. A very useful photograph - nice going!.

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Old Jul 5, 2007, 8:25 AM   #8
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penolta wrote:
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... they cannot hover helicopter-like with the body held vertically as hummingbirds do
You mean like this? :-) :lol: :-)





-> They are still very speedy (hovering) though which is why I need to pull-out the 120-300 which is faster in AF than my 100-400
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Old Jul 5, 2007, 10:21 AM   #9
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NHL wrote:
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penolta wrote:
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... they cannot hover helicopter-like with the body held vertically as hummingbirds do
You mean like this? :-) :lol: :-)


Exactly. Excellent - you can even see the wings completely rotated (bottom side up). Super photo. Couldn't have asked for better!
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Old Jul 5, 2007, 3:27 PM   #10
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penolta wrote:
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Excellent - you can even see the wings completely rotated (bottom side up)...
Woah - Thank for taking the time to teach us all the inner working of bird flight!

I would have never noticed the inverted wings - One thing I did observed though was how the hummingbirds are so territorial, they would perch on their favorite branch(es) and will aggressively chased away any other hummers from getting near their food sources...
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