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Old Jul 26, 2007, 11:07 AM   #1
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Old Jul 26, 2007, 11:11 AM   #2
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Old Jul 26, 2007, 3:12 PM   #3
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you guys brought those evil birds to America, and now they're taking over all the other birds

*nice shots though, and I'll try not to hold a grudge
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Old Jul 26, 2007, 11:52 PM   #4
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xfxgeforced wrote:
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you guys brought those evil birds to America, and now they're taking over all the other birds
"The common starling, Sturnus vulgaris, native to Eurasia, has become widely established and has reached nuisance abundance in some areas, often driving out other birds. Starlings, however, are of some value in destroying insect pests and parasites." ...... http://www.4to40.com/earth/geography...asp?counter=90

Who is the'you guys' in yourmessage? Interesting and would like to know. Thanks.
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Old Jul 27, 2007, 2:06 AM   #5
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it was kind of a joke, but when I said "you guys" I was talking about europeans :blah:
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Old Jul 27, 2007, 2:15 AM   #6
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My view: Survival of the fittest.
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Old Jul 27, 2007, 2:34 AM   #7
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wk7leung wrote:
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My view: Survival of the fittest.
it's an exotic species though... It's a real problem when they take bluebird nests and make them endangered someday, then missouri's state bird is gone forever becuase of some bird that was brought over by humans. Humans suck at that kinda stuff
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Old Jul 27, 2007, 2:44 AM   #8
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Too bad. I take your point. Some mediation has to be done to make it possible for an equilibrium to be maintained.
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Old Jul 27, 2007, 2:47 AM   #9
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Actually, they've tried introducing diseases to them, shooting them, and other methods to control the starling population, but they can't even slow it down they reproduce so much.
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Old Jul 27, 2007, 3:18 AM   #10
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In Hong Kong, we now have a common tree species called Acacia confusa. It is an exotic species and was introduced into HK to prevent soil erosion (due to heavy deforestation in the past) and forest fire in the dry seasons (as some local species easily catch fire due to frictional heat from the rubbing of leaves in the dry seasons; the acacia is with more moisture in the stem and leaves, so less likely to be ignited).

All was good in the first10 years or so, but thenbotanists found that this specieswas growing so successfully and rampantly thatit eventually replaced lots of indigenous species. Some botanists said that the implantationwas a miscalculation and urged thegovernment to do something about it. But the government says the otherwise, maintaining that the tree has donea lots in greening the environment and supporting the other species living in theHong Kong forest.

The situation of the acacia is somewhat similar tothe situation of the starlingin your place. My feeling is: the problem with the acacia is more subtle comparatively speaking as more people care about erosion and forest fire than whether ornot there arespeciesbeing eliminated. Yet, the impact on the environment is equally great and will eventually surface somewhere in time as thefood chain will bechanged.The ultimate consequence will be for usliving in that ecosystemto bear.

Evidently,thephrase 'survival of the fittest' has been taken too lightly by me. Sorry about that.
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