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Old Feb 1, 2008, 1:13 AM   #21
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Nice shots Roger. I concur with what Hung suggested. Having shot a lot of large crows and Ravens, you have to boost your EV comp a little, or make your changes like Tom did in PS. Only real danger of boosting the exposure in PS, is introducing a lot of noise. But NR programs can take care of a lot of that. Use your histogram frequently to the get the exposure right. After a while, you'll just know how to adjust it from what you see. It'll become 2nd nature...cheers..Don
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Old Feb 1, 2008, 6:54 PM   #22
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there's a whole lot of really nice pp work here, but those shots are darn fine to begin with, Roger... especially the first one! seldom see ravens around here, but we get crows all over the place... i've just never bothered tophotograph them!
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Old Feb 1, 2008, 8:50 PM   #23
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I was pretty impressed with that first exposure, Roger. I'm not sure that complete lack of detail in some areas is necessarily a bad thing primarily because even in real life sometimes we don't see all of the details, either in the light areas or dark areas. Sometimes I wonder whether it is an advantage visually if an attempt is made to push detail into something that doesn't naturally show detail in the original environment.

I am impressed with your first photo and where detail is not seen doesn't bother me personally. In fact, it's probably what I would be seeing with my eye if I was the one photographing the bird.

I think that exposing detail is important, for sure, if one can see the detail with the naked eye prior to taking the photograph, but I have my doubts as to the advantage of exposing detail just because it exists even though the human eye could not have detected it in the original light and environment.


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Old Feb 1, 2008, 9:07 PM   #24
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David French wrote:
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Might you try a polarizer? I was thinking, if you're trying to get more exposure in the shadows, you could dial in some positive exposure compensation, but then the reflections mgiht blow out and the sky would be weak. A polarizer should help with both problems.

I personally rather like the first shot. Do you see all that shadow detail exposed to you when you look at the bird with your naked eye?

That Active D-Lighting of the new Nikons would really come in handy here. Perhaps you could try burst mode bracketing, one at meter and the next 1-3 thirds up, combining them as a HDR?
Interesting idea thanks.


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Old Feb 1, 2008, 9:08 PM   #25
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thekman620 wrote:
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Nice shots Roger. I concur with what Hung suggested. Having shot a lot of large crows and Ravens, you have to boost your EV comp a little, or make your changes like Tom did in PS. Only real danger of boosting the exposure in PS, is introducing a lot of noise. But NR programs can take care of a lot of that. Use your histogram frequently to the get the exposure right. After a while, you'll just know how to adjust it from what you see. It'll become 2nd nature...cheers..Don
I am sure you are right. More stuff for me to learn. Life is full of learning for me.

Thanks

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Old Feb 1, 2008, 9:09 PM   #26
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squirl033 wrote:
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there's a whole lot of really nice pp work here, but those shots are darn fine to begin with, Roger... especially the first one! seldom see ravens around here, but we get crows all over the place... i've just never bothered tophotograph them!
Hi Rocky, I agree some of these folks are might good with PP.


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Old Feb 1, 2008, 9:10 PM   #27
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WackyRoger wrote:
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David French wrote:
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Might you try a polarizer? I was thinking, if you're trying to get more exposure in the shadows, you could dial in some positive exposure compensation, but then the reflections mgiht blow out and the sky would be weak. A polarizer should help with both problems.

I personally rather like the first shot. Do you see all that shadow detail exposed to you when you look at the bird with your naked eye?

That Active D-Lighting of the new Nikons would really come in handy here. Perhaps you could try burst mode bracketing, one at meter and the next 1-3 thirds up, combining them as a HDR?
Interesting idea thanks.


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DAAAAA why didn't I think about taking a 2nd look with my eyes to get an idea of what I am seeing. Thanks for the information.


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Old Feb 2, 2008, 10:52 AM   #28
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Normcar wrote:
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I was pretty impressed with that first exposure, Roger. I'm not sure that complete lack of detail in some areas is necessarily a bad thing primarily because even in real life sometimes we don't see all of the details, either in the light areas or dark areas. Sometimes I wonder whether it is an advantage visually if an attempt is made to push detail into something that doesn't naturally show detail in the original environment.

I am impressed with your first photo and where detail is not seen doesn't bother me personally. In fact, it's probably what I would be seeing with my eye if I was the one photographing the bird.

I think that exposing detail is important, for sure, if one can see the detail with the naked eye prior to taking the photograph, but I have my doubts as to the advantage of exposing detail just because it exists even though the human eye could not have detected it in the original light and environment.

VERY good reminder to me. I need to remember and take the 2nd look so I know what my eyes are really seeing. Thanks a bunch.


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Old Feb 4, 2008, 4:24 PM   #29
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Hey TWR...

Wassup? See you're over to Canon now... what lens were you using on the Raven? Still have your Bigma or using the L stuff?

As others have commented, pretty well nailed the exposures and just need to brush up on some post processing... I usually PP with Focus Magic to check for any OOF pixels, then Levels, Contrast/Shadows and Sharpening

I just got the newer Nikkor 70-300 VRII for a good light weight travel telephoto when my Bigma is just too much... Waiting to see the reviews/pricing on the new Sigma 150-500 HSM/OS unit just announced..

I've been out of commission for a while. Had to send in my D50 for a warranty repair on a PCB board through Mack and now that its back, weather has been messing' with us here in SoCal...
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Old Feb 5, 2008, 9:57 AM   #30
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I really like your shots. You picked up detail and shading in a very difficult subject. I would be proud to call them mine ust as they are.
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