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Old Aug 12, 2008, 12:47 AM   #11
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lesmore49 wrote:
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# 11 is stunning. How do you get those excellent aquarium shots ?
Hello lesmore49.

I appreciate the comments. As far as tips and techniques, here's what I did.

Canon 20D. Tamron 90mm f2.8. Handheld. No flash. I used the aquarium lights only for my light source. Basically shooting at ISO 800 for all and apeture priority. The apeture varried from f2.8 to f4 depending on how much light I can get. I shoot with autofocus. Manually focussing on a swimming fish is an act of pure frustration. I also sit on an office chair with wheels. This lets me freely slide back and forth on the hard wood floor in front of my fish tank when I am following a particularly fish, keeping my sensor plane parallel to the front of this fish tank.

- I actually shot these pics at different times.
- At first I shot it at night with all the living room lights off. This is important to reduce glare and reflections off the glass. I also recommend wearing a black shirt to further minimize your own reflection.
- Some of the shots I did shoot during the daytime. With the benefit of some non-direct reflected sunlight, I was able to get faster shutter speeds, but then reflections becomes a problem.
- Turn off all pumps and filters to reduce bubbles floating around.
- Try to keep your sensor plane parallel to the glass. If you shoot at an angle the light going through the glass will distort and reduce your image quality.
- Try to follow a particular fish and when it is parallel to the glass take your shot. If you shoot wide open your plane of focus will be shallow.
- Another thing that I have notice is that some fish will have reflective scales. Sometimes the fish will tilt a bit to the side and it will help to reflect some of the light from the aquairum canopy towards your camera. This was give you a bit more light on the subject to work with.
- In post processing, I tend to increase the contrast. This helps to reduce the appearance of the glass and increases the clarity of the shot.

best regards,

- Hung

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Old Aug 12, 2008, 12:48 AM   #12
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ennacac wrote:
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Great sharpness and color Hung. I guess there are things to take photos of around the house too!

Tom
Thanks for the comments Tom. There are endless subjects to shoot when it comes to the world of macro photography!

- Hung
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Old Aug 12, 2008, 12:57 AM   #13
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penolta wrote:
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For a telephoto/bird photographer, you have certainly mastered close-up photography in a hurry! :O

I can't help you with that pointy-headed moth - I've seen them before, and I think I even identified one for someone once, but I can't remember what it is. If I find it, I'll let you know. The beetle, however, in not a Japanese Beetle (fortunately they are not much of a problem west of the Mississippi), although it is sometimes called a Chinese Beetle. It is probably a Green Peach Beetle, Cotinus mutabilis, common in this area. We often find their large white grubs in our backyard compost pile. One of these large beetles may be the culprit eating holes in our passion fruits: http://forums.steves-digicams.com/fo...mp;forum_id=80
Thanks for the correct ID penolta. It makes sense too because my dad has peach and nectarine trees in the backyard which they seem to love. Macro photography is alot of fun once you learn a few basic techniques. Pretty much everyone can do it too because it doesn't require alot expensive equipment either unlike bird photography. My basic kit consists of:
- my trusty Canon 20D
- Tamron 90mm f2.8 Di
- Canon 580 Ex II external flash
- my DIY ghetto flash diffuser made from junk mail, aluminum foil, a paper towel and lotsa scotch tape.
- a set of extension tubes
- I know some macro photographers that just use a reversed 50mm lens.

best regards,

- Hung
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Old Aug 12, 2008, 1:40 AM   #14
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Great shootin' Hung!!! I like the 4th one best, but all are really good!...cheers....Don
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Old Aug 12, 2008, 2:59 PM   #15
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thekman620 wrote:
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Great shootin' Hung!!! I like the 4th one best, but all are really good!...cheers....Don
Thanks Don. I appreciate the comment. I've come to the conclusion that I am going to have to get up at the crack of dawn before the rest of my family wakes up on the weekend in order to get some time in at the local wildlife sanctuary for some shooting. Now I just have to motivate myself to go to bed earlier the night before. LOL.

- Hung
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Old Aug 12, 2008, 10:08 PM   #16
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Awesome! Very sharp, well framed and perfectly exposed. All are great and I especially like 3, 4 and 12. Peter
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Old Aug 15, 2008, 8:32 PM   #17
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The brown moth is a top secret government project called the unmanned stealth moth. Used for taking spy photos in enemy territory. :lol::blah:
GW

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