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Old Feb 8, 2009, 2:13 PM   #1
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I noticed this Long Billed Curlew repeated running away from a Willet after pulling a clam out of the mud, and I managed to catch this one failed attempt of the Willet to grab the clam as the Curlew pulled it up. You can see the Willet's track in the water as it ran up, and you can see in front of the Willet's bill the track in the water made by the Curlew's bill as it pulled the clam out and started to run. Both the Willet and I were a fraction of a second too late to get the two bills together.

Kleptoparasitism is common in some species (Bald Eagles, Frigate Birds, Skuas and Jaegers, and Gulls) but any predatory species can be opportunistic enough to try. This Willet seemed to be making a habit of it.
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Old Feb 8, 2009, 7:31 PM   #2
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penolta wrote:

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I noticed this Long Billed Curlew repeated running away from a Willet after pulling a clam out of the mud, and I managed to catch this one failed attempt of the Willet to grab the clam as the Curlew pulled it up. You can see the Willet's track in the water as it ran up, and you can see in front of the Willet's bill the track in the water made by the Curlew's bill as it pulled the clam out and started to run. Both the Willet and I were a fraction of a second too late to get the two bills together.

Kleptoparasitism is common in some species (Bald Eagles, Frigate Birds, Skuas and Jaegers, and Gulls) but any predatory species can be opportunistic enough to try. This Willet seemed to be making a habit of it.
Great photo, penolta. We don't have these species over here, regrettably. There is a similar species though, the Numenius arquata (picture loan from Swedish Ornithological Association)

BTW You have a great balans, avoiding anthropomorphisms, observing animal behaviour in their natural surroundings. Kudos to you for that. Seems to me the disneyfication of animals and the obsession with feather and other detail (wich you very well can observe at Natural History Museums) has little to do with true nature photography


Regards


Torgny


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Old Feb 10, 2009, 8:47 PM   #3
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Thanks for the kind words, Torgny. Your Eurasian Curlew is very similar to our Long-billed Curlew.
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