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Old Oct 5, 2009, 6:34 PM   #1
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Default Canadian Goose Sequence - Coming at ya

I had a great morning at the marsh. While walkiing back to the car, semi obscured by the tall eel grass, a flock of about twenty Geese, flying low, were headed in my direction. Except for the last frame, it's all the same goose. My equipment is too powerful to show the whole flock.

In the first image, neither I nor the dog have been spotted...




The exact moment of recognition




After that, they frantically turned to avoid me. These guys were flying pretty low, and also gained altitude. The lead goose never took his eyes off me.










I must have had on my special, "I love to eat goose" tee shirt.

Dave
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Old Oct 5, 2009, 9:21 PM   #2
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Years ago I was taking pix in a Marsh in Canada. There were lot's of Canada Geese and Snow geese...they were continually coming in for landings. I was using my old Pentax ES 11 with a very long 90-230 mm Bushnell Zoom lens.

Every time I raised the camera and more importantly the long, black lens...the geese would spot it, start squawking and pull up rapidly to higher altitude.

I assume they thought I was a hunter and the long lens was a shotgun.
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Old Oct 6, 2009, 9:16 AM   #3
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Years ago I was taking pix in a Marsh in Canada. There were lot's of Canada Geese and Snow geese...they were continually coming in for landings. I was using my old Pentax ES 11 with a very long 90-230 mm Bushnell Zoom lens.

Every time I raised the camera and more importantly the long, black lens...the geese would spot it, start squawking and pull up rapidly to higher altitude.

I assume they thought I was a hunter and the long lens was a shotgun.
My rig looks like I'm taking them out with a stinger missle...

Shoot and cook the Geese in one easy motion. No wonder they panicked...

Dave
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Old Oct 6, 2009, 9:53 AM   #4
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I don't think I've ever seen a Canada that "in your face". Great series!!
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Old Oct 7, 2009, 5:14 PM   #5
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800mm (=1200mm) hand held - very impressive.
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Old Oct 7, 2009, 5:43 PM   #6
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800mm (=1200mm) hand held - very impressive.
Took about six months of steady shooting before I started to get keepers. Persistance (or stuborness) from time to time pays off.

I could never do this with my Sigma 50-500 - It weighs more, and gives me less leverage than the Swarovski. The carbon monopode I use, believe it or not, also helps shooting handheld. It acts to stabilise the camera and lens.

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Old Oct 8, 2009, 11:36 AM   #7
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Great shots
Go to a hunting store and buy some season appropriate camo cloth, sew a tube to go around your lens, it becomes a bit less obvious and scary.

Cheaper home-made version of the commercial lens covers but it is a bit harder to use.

Here is what the commercial ones look like, but I think they want way more $ than they are worth for them. Maybe I am just cheap
http://www.wildlifewatchingsupplies.co.uk/lens.htm
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Old Oct 8, 2009, 11:46 AM   #8
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Very very very cool pixs.......(did i say very?) they are awesome....and excited me to get out there until I read what you are using $$$$$$$$$$$
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Old Oct 8, 2009, 11:48 AM   #9
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Great shots
Go to a hunting store and buy some season appropriate camo cloth, sew a tube to go around your lens, it becomes a bit less obvious and scary.

Cheaper home-made version of the commercial lens covers but it is a bit harder to use.

Here is what the commercial ones look like, but I think they want way more $ than they are worth for them. Maybe I am just cheap
http://www.wildlifewatchingsupplies.co.uk/lens.htm
Probably cheaper to go to a local fabric store....or even a local cheap clothing store and pick up a camo pullover and cut it up...(second hand clothing store work too...) I am thinking the sleeve would be over the lens your head in the hood??? (XXXL)
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Old Oct 8, 2009, 12:08 PM   #10
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Probably cheaper to go to a local fabric store....or even a local cheap clothing store and pick up a camo pullover and cut it up...(second hand clothing store work too...) I am thinking the sleeve would be over the lens your head in the hood??? (XXXL)
Using a blind is a very effective way (assuming you put it up in a good location) to get wild life images. But I like to walk around, and I find that dressing in drab clothing, (avoiding anything bright or reflective like the plague) works as well as camoflage. Wild birds at any rate, are more attuned to motion than anything else. So I walk slowly, freeze at the hint of an animal in the vicinity, keep my camera in such a position that moving into shooting position is one simple up and down motion of a mere six inches.

If I stop for a while, I stop so that I am shaded by some cover, any cover will do, since if I'm not moviing, I blend in.

At first, I litterally wore a suit made out of moss and leaves - That worked - But no better than what I now wear - And motion is motion. Even a pile of leaves in motion spooks the birds. My lens and camera may or may not have an effect, but it's a dull blue, and there's no way to hide the glass.

I believe that getting into the above habits as second nature, will give more results than anything spent on clothing. One nice thing about shooting birds is that with the exception of Turkey Vultures and Albatroses, they have a lousy sense of smell. Yet I've had no trouble getting close to vultures, and I rarely stalk albatroses in the woods.

Dave
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