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Old Feb 13, 2010, 10:32 PM   #11
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Thanks Dave, I see what you're saying but I am at a loss. The light was crappy and the shutter speed was a little slower than I would have liked (1/400th) But other than that .......? I am going to chalk it up the the light and slow shutter.
There, now I feel better.
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Old Feb 13, 2010, 10:33 PM   #12
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# 2 is great.

Thanks, I appreciate it.
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Old Feb 13, 2010, 10:44 PM   #13
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Thanks Dave, I see what you're saying but I am at a loss. The light was crappy and the shutter speed was a little slower than I would have liked (1/400th) But other than that .......? I am going to chalk it up the the light and slow shutter.
There, now I feel better.
What impressed me about these images is the difficulty of capturing the range of these birds. You succeeded marvelously!!!

(Trust me, I take many images of this species and most do not capture the range. For some strange reason, I'm not going to post the failures - Go figure?)

But it's a disappointment to see the lack of detail. Are you Sure that you have NR turned off?

Dave
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Old Feb 13, 2010, 11:20 PM   #14
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I know exactly what you are saying about how hard it is to get good range of detail on Blackbirds. Here is another shot taken with the same setup on another day when the sun was out. The only difference between this shot and the others is that in this shot the ISO was set to 200 @ 1/500sec. I checked and the High ISO NR is set to NORM, which is were it has always been. Long exp NR is OFF.
Thanks for all your feedback I really appreciate it.

Steve
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Old Feb 14, 2010, 8:22 AM   #15
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beautiful looking bird
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Old Feb 14, 2010, 2:34 PM   #16
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I know exactly what you are saying about how hard it is to get good range of detail on Blackbirds. Here is another shot taken with the same setup on another day when the sun was out. The only difference between this shot and the others is that in this shot the ISO was set to 200 @ 1/500sec. I checked and the High ISO NR is set to NORM, which is were it has always been. Long exp NR is OFF.
Thanks for all your feedback I really appreciate it.

Steve

On my camera, "Normal" means I am getting NR if the camera is set at ISO 400 or above. I have it turned OFF. "On," simply means heavier NR.

My camera is the D2x and I have no idea if you have the same options - But it certainly looks that way.

I much prefer to handle NR in Photoshop via Noise Ninja (or an equivalent).

Dave
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Old Feb 14, 2010, 3:31 PM   #17
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Yes, I think it is the same on the D300. and I do have the option of turning it off, or setting it higher, no thanks, or setting lower. Generally I have found that the Normal setting works pretty well. I too have Noise Nija so maybe I will experiment with the High ISO NR turned off and see what happens. I was shooting at ISO 800 for that series so maybe that plus the low light things just got compounded?

Thanks, Steve
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Old Feb 14, 2010, 5:27 PM   #18
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Steve, No2 and the last one are great shots and perfect for showing the form of Redwing known as the Bicolored Blackbird. Where were these taken? The Bicolored Blackbird evolved in the Central Valley (Sacramento/San Joaquin) which used to be the stronghold of Tricolored Blackbirds (a separate species). The Redwings lost the yellow bordered epaulet to distinguish themselves from the Tricolors with the their white borders. Since the ecology of the Valley has been disrupted by drought and drainage, the Tricolors have spread out from the Valley in search of other wetlands, and I guess the Bicolors have too. The tinge of yellow in No2 probably is indicative of hybridization with typical Redwings. I am not sure of the inheritance of that factor, but I suppose we see more Tricolors than Bicolors outside the Valley because the Bicolors will hybridize with typical Redwings and can be genetically "swamped" by the more numerous typical redwings.

Thanks for the great photos.
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Old Feb 14, 2010, 5:44 PM   #19
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Steve, No2 and the last one are great shots and perfect for showing the form of Redwing known as the Bicolored Blackbird. Where were these taken? The Bicolored Blackbird evolved in the Central Valley (Sacramento/San Joaquin) which used to be the stronghold of Tricolored Blackbirds (a separate species). The Redwings lost the yellow bordered epaulet to distinguish themselves from the Tricolors with the their white borders. Since the ecology of the Valley has been disrupted by drought and drainage, the Tricolors have spread out from the Valley in search of other wetlands, and I guess the Bicolors have too. The tinge of yellow in No2 probably is indicative of hybridization with typical Redwings. I am not sure of the inheritance of that factor, but I suppose we see more Tricolors than Bicolors outside the Valley because the Bicolors will hybridize with typical Redwings and can be genetically "swamped" by the more numerous typical redwings.

Thanks for the great photos.
These were taken about 75-80 miles north of Sacramento at the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge. I would say that about 90% of the Blackbirds that aren't Brewers, have this color pattern (no yellow border) The remainder have a slight yellow edge around the red. Now that I think about it. Most probably do have the yellow, it's just not all that noticeable when they are flying.
Thanks for the lesson, I appreciate your educational posts. I always find them interesting.
Cheers,
Steve
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Old Feb 14, 2010, 10:06 PM   #20
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Thanks for the lesson, I appreciate your educational posts. I always find them interesting.
Cheers,
Steve
Glad to know my small contributions are appreciated by you and some others who have said so - but I'm not sure by some others. The other day I PM'd a poster in another forum with a correction and information about an erroneous statement - it was neither acknowledged nor corrected, just ignored, so I don't think that it was appreciated. I could correct it myself, but no one has questioned it, so I will probably let it die, but these posts appear quickly when a fact is searched for on Google, and I can imagine some poor student quoting wrong information in a term paper and being graded down for it! I posted something poorly worded the other day and then went to Google to double check (should have done that first) and bang - there it was! And before I changed it, it was quoted in a subsequent post, so even though I went back and edited mine, the other will be there forever!
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