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Old May 26, 2004, 5:17 AM   #11
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Thank you for the great post. It's given me lots of ideas for my photos.
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Old May 26, 2004, 12:35 PM   #12
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well i'm impressed.....did you figure all this out yourself?

thanks for this great post! gives me a reason to use RAW...lol....i'm not sure i'll be able to get any this close of birds though :-\

thanks eric! this helped a lot....
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Old May 26, 2004, 12:37 PM   #13
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I haven't had time to read it all (I'm at work) but I wanted to thank you very much for posting this. I don't enjoy the photoshop side of digital photography because I know that I'm not good enough at it to bring out the potential of my shots. This makes me think I'm wasting my time and I find myself second guessing what I do... not fun.

I will study and try ittonight. I've heard of other ways to achieve the first goal, dealing with the blown out hilight (including using linear RAW conversion and blending it in like you do here.) I'll have to try them both.

Thanks again. I'm sure this took a while to write up, and I appreciate it.

Humm... maybe we should post a link to this in the photoshop/editing section of this forum. This is good stuff that shouldn't be missed.

Eric
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Old May 26, 2004, 2:12 PM   #14
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photosbyvito wrote:
Quote:
well i'm impressed.....did you figure all this out yourself?

thanks for this great post! gives me a reason to use RAW...lol....i'm not sure i'll be able to get any this close of birds though :-

thanks eric! this helped a lot....
In 6 months playing with PS yes, hehe I'm a self learner, but some of the tricks were found at Luminous Landscape

The object of this workflow was not to shot a super image at the end, just to illustrate what can be done. Personally, I would make the white feather a tad brighter, but would loose some details. But I overexposed the shot, If I could do it again, I would normally shoot one shot, then quickly change the shutter speed higher and lower and shoot more. So I would have enough room to get the perfect shot.

White feathers is very tricky, you have to intentionally expose to the negative side, by at least 1 EC, most of the time its between -1 1/3 and 1 2/3 , but then you would loose details on the darker ones.

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Old May 26, 2004, 2:15 PM   #15
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eric s wrote:
Quote:
I haven't had time to read it all (I'm at work) but I wanted to thank you very much for posting this. I don't enjoy the photoshop side of digital photography because I know that I'm not good enough at it to bring out the potential of my shots. This makes me think I'm wasting my time and I find myself second guessing what I do... not fun.

I will study and try ittonight. I've heard of other ways to achieve the first goal, dealing with the blown out hilight (including using linear RAW conversion and blending it in like you do here.) I'll have to try them both.

Thanks again. I'm sure this took a while to write up, and I appreciate it.

Humm... maybe we should post a link to this in the photoshop/editing section of this forum. This is good stuff that shouldn't be missed.

Eric

Hmm I started at 9H30 PM, ended at 1H00 AM, LOL ! It was a long process, in real world it takes me about 1/2 hour to complete a workflow like this. Every keepers I intend to show on the web, or print will go through a workflow similar

You're welcomed

Cheers
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Old May 26, 2004, 4:58 PM   #16
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White feathers is very tricky, you have to intentionally expose to the negative side, by at least 1 EC, most of the time its between -1 1/3 and 1 2/3 , but then you would loose details on the darker ones.
What metering mode do you normally use? I've been using the partial spot meter and been fairly happy with it. I find it's fairly easy to understand what it will do (and when it will be wrong or right.) But some people seem to really like the center weighted average. Why I ask is because the EC numbers you gave above are directly effected by the metering mode.

I agree with your -1EC for birds with a lot of white in my experience.

Well, I can say that for me it was 3 1/2 hours well spent. I do appreciate it, and I hope to put it to use on some of my shots of eider ducks (that have a very heavy white component to their plumage, but black wings. A challenging exposure!)

Eric
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Old May 26, 2004, 5:18 PM   #17
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I use Center-Weight Average a lot in M mode. But I use also Partial in M too when I feel that the bird / scenery will be challenging. It's just a question of how I feel given a specific circumstance.

That shot was taken in M, it was only few weeks I had the camera and was still learning quite a lot back then. Trial and error was the description. I'm more in control now of the whole thing. Although I know I still havea long way to go, sometimes there's a 'special' bird presenting like this, and I'll make rookie mistakes because I somewhat panicked ;not proper exposure,metered at the wrong place, focus at the wrong place and so on, LOL. I wonder how I'll be in lets say 1 year from now on.

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